Oh the Colts, They Need a Startin’!

Join Anna and the ROTH Methods to discover the difference between starting and breaking…

coltstarting2019 (002)

 The process of  starting under saddle is one of the most impressionable times of a young horse’s life.  If done correctly, you move smoothly into an ever-lasting partnership. If done incorrectly, you spend many hours, weeks, months, or even years figuring out their history and reassuring them of a non-violent future.

During this week you will learn and practice gentle communication methods.  These methods are proven with positive results around the Globe in all equine disciplines.  They are highly effective, safe and very efficient for not only young, un-started horses but also to reestablish a more cooperative relationship with mature horses as well.Starting the Young Horse Clinic

Goals for students are to learn:

  • Creating a successful program from the ground-up
  • Reading individual horses varying in age, size, breed & background
  • Starting young horses under saddle
  • Demonstrating the starting of remedial horses
  • Methods to start horses in 30 minutes or less!
  • When to use a Round Pen &, more importantly, when not to use a Round Pen
  • How to take the individual horse from the Round Pen to the arena/trail
  • Creating a successful training program for the young horse
  • How to solve your Round Pen issues/overcome challenging situations
  • Bridging the gap from body language to rider!

Tell Me More About Starting vs Breaking

Advertisements

Fancy a Frolic with the Foals?

Final foals 2019

Let us show you how to create a bond that can’t be broken.

Over the course of 7 days, Anna will introduce you to her unique and comprehensive foal gentling methodologies. Through gentle, compassionate, and supportive communication, you will discover how to quickly and effectively introduce foals to the world of humans, training, and even their own language. These techniques are also very effective for untouched and spooky horses, and to help solve the most frustrating behavioral issues with all your horses.

You will learn (and put to use) the same uniquely designed and tested program that Anna, herself, has developed and used to start hundreds of foals!

Gentling foals can be some of the most important and rewarding work you will ever do. In this case, your efforts are even more critical. The foals we work with in this event are untrained and rescued. So in addition to getting world-class, groundbreaking training, you are helping these innocent, rescued souls. You are giving them a loving, heart-filled introduction to the human-horse connection, and gaining a solid foundation that will help them in their lives. You are also helping them to gain a greater possibility of being adopted, and a second-chance at a life they deserve to live.

I Want to Learn More About Foal Gentling

Can you hear the call of the Wild Ones?

Only TWO SPOTS LEFT for this year’s Untouched Horse Course!

Final Mustangs 2019

Imagine being pulled out of your home, away from your family and friends, and taken to an unknown place where you are introduced to foreigners who do not speak your language. This is exactly what these symbols of freedom so often experience.

By understanding and attuning to these magnificent creatures, and seeing the world through their eyes, you will begin to master their language. You will learn how to socialize them, create trust & value in a relationship and identify their motivations & learning styles. This class is ideal for those who have recently fostered or adopted untouched horses and can be arranged in your area.

Immerse yourself in a 7-day workshop. This is a unique opportunity to observe wild horses in their natural habitat. You will begin to understand non-verbal communication with the natural world, be introduced to herd dynamics and develop a bond through building a trust-based relationship. You will not use chutes, ropes, or any other restraints to force the horse’s compliance. Instead, you will work one-on-one with the wild ones, gaining their trust, learning their language, and building a relationship and true partnership that you have always dreamed of but never knew was possible.

 

Take Me to the Wild Ones!

Teaching your Horse to Tie

Horsemanship Network

Read through Anna’s latest article shared on the Horsemanship Network!

Being tied doesn’t come naturally to horses, but it’s an essential skill for them to learn.

teaching-your-horse-to-tie

There are many situations in which it’s important for your horse to tie well. It could be for the vet or farrier, at a show or event, or perhaps while you are grooming and tacking up. While it may seem simple enough, your horse may have quite a different perspective.

As prey animals, horses have a strong inborn desire to flee in the face of perceived danger. When a horse is tied, he can’t respond in this way. For the uninitiated or fearful horse, this can set off alarm bells and send him into a state of frantic panic, particularly if there is no breaking point or release in sight.

It is also important to recognize that horses are innately “into pressure” beings and – by their very nature – they lean into the point of pressure. This leads a horse to lean into you when you press on his flank, rump or other part of his body; or to raise his head high when asked to follow the feel of the lead rope.

Without any support, or formal trust-based training, it is unlikely a horse will automatically take to being tied. While some horses may learn fairly easily to accept being tied, others may have had experiences where they’ve broken their halters, hitching posts or worse, and have subsequently developed a phobia to tying. The good news is that no matter what his age, any horse can be taught what is expected of him if you use a kind and patient manner.

Set your horse up for success

There are number of things you can teach and practice with your horse to help prepare him for being able to tie well. By taking the time to do this work and approaching the task in an open, empathetic and supportive manner, you can create powerful and lasting results while avoiding mistakes or gaps in training that will require fixing later.

Pressure and release

One key to training your horse to tie well is teaching him to yield to pressure in situations that are stress-free, before introducing him to stressful scenarios. The first rule is to never attempt to tie without first exploring your horse’s knowledge of pressure and release.

  • Neck stretches and yields following the feel of the line
  • Light touch head drops
  • Forward and back rocking horse steps
  • Altering gait and speed while leading

As the exercises build on one another, make sure to create times for your horse to feel somewhat restricted while being given a chance to find a way out using collaborative communication.</p

Desensitization exercises

Once your horse fully understands how to get himself out of trouble by coming forward towards the pressure, it is time to introduce him to some surprises. It’s easy to teach him to tie when everything is calm, but you would be remiss if you didn’t prepare him for the unexpected, and provide him with appropriate coping skills for those stressful or startling moments.

  • Desensitize to scary objects and items
  • Desensitize to startling and unusual sounds
  • Graduate to an in-hand obstacle course of higher learning

Building confidence

Another key to successfully training your horse to tie is to address the emotional and mental factors that create a “non-tying horse” to begin with. Training is essential to building the horse’s confidence in both himself and you, and will allow you to create a trust-based partnership.

This can be done over time as your horse learns to come into himself more, leave the herd behind, explore and venture off campus, and experience a multitude of environments and situations. Once he has a good foundation of confidence, you can gradually introduce him to new locations and scenarios, and increase the stimuli that will trigger fears, such as a fear of isolation. Soon, fear will be replaced with the understanding that he is safe, even when you are asking him to be restricted or isolated for a time.

Training your horse to tie

The simplest way to begin is to loop the line over a hitching post to create some resistance, and hold it in your hand while grooming! This way, the horse does not hit a rigid line and panic, which could put both of you at risk for bodily harm. Instead, your horse will be able to feel the give while at the same time making a pleasant association with tying through mindful grooming.

This same looping method applies while teaching the horse to tie at a trailer, wash rack or other location, keeping in mind the necessity for excellent footing and surrounding safety. Naturally, the horse finds himself in a pressure/release situation and you may decide to include food as a reward to enhance the situation while expediting the lesson.

You may also want to introduce the quick release knot, popular around the world. It gives a similar sense of resistance but still gives you a chance to release the horse should he panic.

Some equestrians swear by the tradition of tying to a piece of string or bailing twine on a tie-ring to ensure breakaway. Although some believe that horses can learn their own strength by snapping these strings, and that you should never allow them to break away, I have seen it save lives. While this tradition remains prevalent, its popularity is being overridden by the blocker tie ring, which provides soft resistance and safe tying without using knots.

If all else fails and your horse is truly phobic, you may decide to ground-tie him by simply teaching him to stand still when the attached lead rope is placed on the ground close by. It’s a pretty easy “trick” to start with and moves effortlessly into all you do when you ask your horse to stand!

Work with, not against, your horse

From decades of experience worldwide, I have witnessed many approaches and seen some horrendous tying styles, ranging from snubbing posts through solitary standing stalls. Although it is customary for trainers to state that their methods work, these harmful and sometimes even cruel training styles simply aren’t necessary, and reflect a fear-based, dominance style of training.

Remember that teaching your horse to tie goes beyond simply seeking a place for him to stand and wait — it is an introduction to the concepts of patience, respect, focus and a time to process.

The bottom line is to recognize that tying is not something that comes “naturally” to a horse. Choosing a style of training that supports and works with your horse’s mind, and encourages trust, not dominance, will help him find success with being tied, and will create fewer issues down the road.

Our Gratitude Speaks when We Care and We Share the ROTH Way

 

As a result of the many donations Anna sends we often get lovely expressions of gratitude that come seemingly out of the blue!  It always brings a smile to our faces and warms our hearts to know that people are enjoying learning about the methods and bringing the message to their volunteers and other cooperating organizations.

thank-you-this-old-horse.jpg

 

thank-you-pt-2-this-old-horse.jpg

Thanks, Monica, and This Old Horse!  We slaute the work you do in the world on behalf of the Mustangs!

Want to know more about the DVD referenced here, Whispers from the Wild Ones? 

Show me how to Capture the Whisper!

Or, does it intrigue you, the idea of gentling one of America’s last, great, wild icons?  Discover the Untouched Horse Course in California at the Wild Horse Sanctuary this August? Go here for all the details!

Tell me about gentling the wild ones

 

We also got this message on Facebook from a student of the methods, Cynthia Lawson Greene of Sumner, MI, who was able to apply what she learned in Foals In Training DVD to her Mustang, Scarlet:

“Anna, we have your DVD set on foal training…we have applied it to gentling out mustang, Scarlet. I never thought about running and massaging the ears and surrounding area…Thank you. First time I did Scarlet pulled away some but now I can touch them at will…she is a sweetheart…thank you!”

Cynthia, we are SO pelased to hear that the FIT methods were easily applicable to Scarlet!  Thank YOU for offering a good home to the Mustangs!  We sincerely appreciate those of you who do.

This is just one more testimonial to the fact that the ROTH methods are NOT A COOKIE-CUTTER SYSTEM, but rather a methodology based in the language of Equus, which can be applied to each horse individually based on their learning style, likes/dislikes, personality, character and personal history.  When we use the language of the horse to speak and to request their collaboration, it eliminates the barriers that other “training systems” can create.  We are always thrilled to get messages of gratitude!  Thanks again, Cynthia, for Reaching Out to Share in the Success!

To learn more about the Foals in Training DVD, you can go here:

Tell me about Foals in Training the DVD

And, of course, the Foals have thier own course as well!  Learn how to start them right, from the ground up, and discover a path to partnership rather than a dominance-based, training relationship.

Foals In Training the Course!

 

Anna Reaches Out to her English Roots…

ROTH is excited to be partnering with the Western Horse UK Horsemanship Journal to help bring Anna’s message all the way back to her roots in the UK!  This is the December 2017 publication.  Read along as she discusses the benefits of a personal program vs slotting all horses into a cookie cutter system that is one-size-fits-all for training.

A favorite quote:  “If you are looking for total compliance then I would strongly suggest you buy a motorcycle.”

Can we get a “Here, Here?!”

Always celebrating the individual and free nature of our favorite species, Anna’s approach is truly unique and the results can be obviously seen in how the horses respond.UK magazineUK magazine 2

Christine Matthews Shares about Her ROTH Internship

Internship at ROTH

 

When Anna and Vin initially suggested I return to Colorado to do a 3 month internship at the ROTH Ranch after completing HHC, my first thought was what a wonderful opportunity it would be to learn so much more.  My second thought was “F$%&!  Me?  An intern?  They must have either had too much Costa Rican sun, got the wrong person, or forgotten that I’d only just managed to overcome my fear around horses enough to get a halter on – well, half on – without desperately seeking the nearest fence to vault over – or perhaps crawl under would be more apt!  Of course, they hadn’t and my time with them has been wonderful.

The goal was to have more handling experience, and to become more familiar with the day-to-day running of a horse ranch: feeding, pasture management, fencing, being present for equine professional visits (farrier, chiropractor… etc.) and, of course, getting to know the horses, their needs and understanding the dynamics of the herd a little more.  My greatest challenges were fear, of which I still had a sizeable amount, and the belief in myself that I could actually achieve what was required in an internship, particularly the physical requirements.  I developed a very effective stalling strategy when doubt or fear crept in called “I can’t!”  Anna, thankfully, had an even more effective counter-strategy called “Yes, you can!”  She was right!!  I could!

Honey and I

I have learned so much and as it is with the most valuable kind of learning, this has been on many levels.  I also know there is much more to learn.  My fear has diminished greatly in comparison to what it was and without it getting in the way so much I have been able to experience the joy of “being” with the herd and “seeing” them in a way I wasn’t able to before.  I feel great gratitude for this, for what the horses have shown me about myself, and for the healing this has brought.  Great gratitude, too, goes to Anna and Vin for the bestowing of their knowledge, their unwavering support, and the amazingly good humor shown as a strange Kiwi/Brit blundered about within their lives and all over their property!  Even more gratitude goes to the universe for instigating everything and for keeping everyone, human, equine and canine, alive and intact, while that blundering went on!!!  It has been ……………amazing!

Photo Credit: Lacey Knight