What can Dyna Spark do for you? Listen in!

This Dynamite Conference Call is hosted by Dynamite CEO, Callie Zamzow, featuring special guests, Gold Directors, Judy Sinner and Regan Golob. On this call we learn about electrolytes and the role they play in our bodies and more specifically how Dynamite Dyna Spark can help support your animal’s electrolyte needs.

 

 

Want to discover what is special about the Dynamite way of life?  Visit Anna’s Dynamite page and learn about all the ways Dynamite can support you and your loved ones!

Go here for more! https://dynamitespecialty.myvoffice.com/atwinney/

Do you crave instant access to all the goods?  Want to know more about supplements, courses, natural horsemanship, animal communication, Reiki energy healing and more?  Sign up for our newsletter, Diary of a Horse Whisperer, and get everything delivered conveniently to your inbox! Sign up here: http://www.reachouttohorses.com/contact/register.php

 

 

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Reexamining Natural Hoof Care: ROTH’s 2017 HHC Students Take the Reins

“The unexamined life is not worth living.”
                                                            – Socrates

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As part of ROTH’s annual Holistic Horse Certification Course, students must choose a topic on which to do a project and then present to the entire class.  Thus far we have seen projects on the benefits and uses of Crystals, Equine Massage, and now, from Asila B. and Keli M., we have a hot topic: Natural Hoof Care! 

Feel free to take advantage of their hard work and discover whether natural hoof care is best for your horse and circumstances.  Thanks, Asila and Keli, for sharing your project with us in order to benefit all horses and their dedicated people!

Natural Hoof Care as an Alternative Therapy

Why did we choose this topic?

  • Photo of Gypsy’s hoof, explaining why she doesn’t want to shoe and is looking for alternatives
  • Many people have said horses in WY need to be shod. Is this true or is it possible to ride barefoot horses on hard ground/rocky terrain?

Horseshoeing controversy: To shoe, or not to shoe…that is the question!

  • Horses were trained and ridden barefoot for centuries before shoes were invented
  • Around the 9th century, shoes were developed as a fix for ailing hooves, and as a tool for war and conquest. *This was the solution at the time for poor hoof health due to the poor conditions horses were being kept in*
  • Over the centuries, the traditional practice of shoeing and the fact that many horses were having problems with their feet, led to the belief that horses “need” shoes in order to stay healthy and be rideable by humans.
  • Over the past few decades, many have begun to question the logic behind shoes, and began to see shoeing as treating the symptom, rather than addressing and identifying the underlying causes of hoof problems.
  • Not only are they not helping hoof problems, in many cases they are probably hurting! Here are just some of the harmful effects of traditional shoes:
  • Foot is lifted off ground, so hoof wall becomes contracted
  • Shoe prevents hoof from its natural expansion when weight is placed on it
  • Clips and nails weaken hoof wall
  • Shoe prevents necessary ground contact with sole and frog, resulting in loss of traction and sensation
  • Reduction of circulation in the foot resulting in loss of sensation, making horse prone to injury

 

What is natural hoof care? Overview and benefits

  • Applies specialized trimming techniques along with improved living conditions to aid in the development of total hoof health.
  • Allows many horses that were previously unable to perform barefoot using traditional trimming/shoeing methods to fully function without any hoof protection.
  • Can be used in disciplines of all kinds, including endurance, trail-riding, competitive driving, jumping, roping, barrel racing, dressage, polo, flat racing, and others.
  • The aim of natural hoof care and natural hoof trimming is to mimic the natural wear of the hoof, and some of the benefits include:
  • Improved blood flow and circulation
  • Healthy, strong hoof walls
  • Heels trimmed to allow greater shock absorption
  • Wearing evenly through movement, and grow evenly and strong
  • Lower risk of injuries when playing pasture or fields
  • Improved traction because nature designed the hoof to adapt to all terrains
  • Less tripping, stumbling, and forging as the horse can feel where her feet are.
  • What is unique in this approach to hoof care is that it is holistic, and considers the complete lifestyle of the horse. From this lifestyle, the barefoot hooves become strong, healthy, and fully functioning, and the entire immune system of the horse is strengthened naturally.
  • Many hoof conditions such as laminitis, navicular, and poor hoof quality can be healed, and other systemic problems (such as allergies and metabolic problems) can disappear.
  • There are several pieces to natural hoof care, each an integral part of the whole system. We are going to cover the optimal scenario, but realize that it is not realistic for everyone to adopt all of these practices.

 

Natural Living Conditions: This means freedom of movement (no box-stall confinement) – optimally living in a pasture or paddock for 24 hours a day/7 days a week in the company of other horses. Horse clothing (bandages, wraps, blankets, etc) is generally to be avoided.

Exercise: Very important! Hand-walk or ride the horse (depending on situation) as much as possible, aiming for the natural amount of movement of 10 miles per day. For horses in transition, spreading hay out in little piles, taking him for frequent short walks on non-concussive ground or in hoof boots, and keeping him in the company of many other horses will all go a long way to encouraging movement.

Diet Changes: include forage, energy sources, vitamins and minerals, other supplements.

Terrain Changes so that the horse’s feet can adapt to a variety of surfaces and inclined terrain

Soaking Hooves: 30 min prior to barefoot trimming expedites the trimming process. Hard, dry feet are healthier, so do not over soak, and only soak with an objective.

*If you are unable to adopt all of these changes with your horse, implement as many as you can.

Proper trimming of the barefoot hoof:

  • Hooves must be trimmed to their natural and proper physiological form, and by someone with the knowledge and training to perform this trim.
  • The main emphasis will be on improving hoof form, which is the key to hoof and horse health. This natural trim is often different from what has been considered “normal” in our modern era, yet it is the correct shape for the horse’s hoof, based on decades of studies of natural equines.

Different trimming methods

  • Pioneered by Jamie Jackson, a former farrier who developed a trimming system based on studies of the shape of a wild horse’s hoof [show photo of barefoot hoof]
  • Emphasized a practical approach, allowing nature to help slowly improve hoof form, with gentle and gradual guidelines for trimming.
  • Includes a mustang roll and quarters are arched (“scooping”)
  • Specifics on this trim:heels are kept low with bulbs nearly on the ground (which results in a near-ground-parallel coffin bone), hairline is straight, quarters are arched, bars are straight and tapered, hooves are wide and round in shape, and entire hoof expands slightly upon weight-bearing (also called hoof mechanism).
  • The Strasser Method, developed by Hiltrud Strasser, a German vet who has been researching the causes and cures of equine lameness for over 20 years.
  • This method is highly controversial!
  • Developed a powerful trimming technique, using surgically precise trimming to drastically alter hoof form for the pathological horses in her clinic
  • The most important message of this method is that we can improve our horse’s health by improving their living condition
  • Gene Ovincekis, another practitioner of natural hoof care who also advocates for corrective shoes for certain horses, uses his own designs and materials (plastics) that take the horse’s natural movement and form into consideration.

These are just a few practitioners of natural hoof care—there are many other methods. The barefoot hoof care movement as practiced today is a blend of these different schools of thought.

Transitioning from shod to barefoot

  • After the shoes are pulled, there is a rehabilitation period that can take anywhere from several months to over a year.There are many factors that determine a horse’s transition time, including diet, environment, the horse’s personal history, and the amount of internal foot damage. The longer a horse has been shod, the longer the transition can take.
  • The increased blood flow starts to rebuild internal structures that were damaged by the shoes.
  • Hoof boots are a great way to protect horses’ feet during transition time as their soles callous over.
  • At the set of the transition, your horse should be healthy, fit, and young to middle age, and in good body condition. Older horses may require more time to adapt but these horses are the ones most deserving of a less constrictive way of life as they settle into retirement.

Things to consider when going barefoot

  • Weigh the pros and cons based on the needs of your horse, the time you have to care for your horse during the transition, the support you have, and the desired outcome.
  • Consult with a professional farrier who practices barefoot trimming, as well as your vet.
  • Consider the type of trim. Most people prefer a slow approach (Jamie Jackson)over an aggressive approach (Strasser method)
  • Managing problems. Most common problems include shorter stride, tender soles, and in some cases, extreme soreness. First aid may be required (soaking, sole packing, foot wrap).
  • Be flexible. Some horses with thin hoof walls also have thin soles and may not be good candidates for going barefoot, so it depends on the individual horse and how they adapt.
  • Give your horse time. Your horse will require at least 3-4 months to show you how he has adapted to his new shoeless life. Pain is not a part of the process. Though you should exercise your horse during this time of transition, he should not be in pain. Pain can be caused by any number of foot or leg problems. Consult a vet if you see pain symptoms.

Should shoes always be avoided?

If a horse is required to perform a task where nail-on shoes would be a benefit, i.e. to gain traction while pulling loads on icy roads or while on a roadway which would abrade the hoof faster than it can repair itself, then there is no reason not to use shoes, if they are used with respect for the functions of the foot and only for a limited amount of time.

Resources:

thehorseshoof.com

barefoothorse.com

barehoofschool.com

thinklikeahorse.org

all-natural-horse-care.com

hoofgeek.com

 

Jamie Jackson Method:

American Association of Natural Hoof Care Practitioners (AANHCP)

Horse Owner’s Guide to Natural Hoof Care

Paddock Paradise

The Natural Horse

The Natural Trim

 

Strasser Method:

Institute of Hoof Health, Germany

strasserhoofcare.org

 

Gene Ovincek:

Podcast on ROTH website (http://www.reachouttohorses.com/news.html)

edsshoofcare.com

 

Diet Changes

Even if you don’t decide to go barefoot right away, implementing diet changes can make a huge improvement in hoof health. Here are some recommended changes from natural hoof care practitioners, James and Yvonne Welz.

THE HORSE’S HOOF DIET

How do you keep your horse’s diet as natural as possible if you don’t have 100 acres of varied terrain to supply your horse with the different plants and minerals that he requires to fulfill his nutritional needs? These recommendations are based on our own trial and error experiences and our latest nutritional research findings.

FORAGE: Forage should be the basis of the equine diet. Feed free choice grass hay or pasture as much as possible. Try to provide something for your horse to munch on 24 hours a day. Provide lower quality grass hays to the easy-keepers. We highly recommend slow-feeding systems. Some horses with hoof problems are very sensitive to sugar content of hay, and some grass hays can be high in sugar. Try to limit alfalfa or legume hays to no more than 10-20% of the total daily hay quantity. It may be a good idea to feed a very small amount of alfalfa daily to any horse not on grass pasture, for the extra nutrients it provides. We have personally observed no ill effects on hooves from the feeding of small amounts of alfalfa but it is high in calories, has a poor mineral balance and too much protein for horses, so feed it sparingly.

ENERGY SOURCES: Grain. Grain should be considered more of a supplement than a food due to the many problems caused by excess starch in a horse’s diet. A handful of grain a day fed for variety will not be a problem for most horses. Whole grains should be clean and from a trustworthy source. Ideally buy organic or pesticide free and non-GMO. As long as the amounts fed are kept to a minimum, all grains can be fed to some horses in very small quantities for variety. Horses with Insulin Resistance, Metabolic Syndrome, or EPSM/ PSSM or other grain-sensitive disorders should usually avoid all grains. Grain substitutes. If you need something to mix supplements in, try using soaked grass hay pellets, or grass and alfalfa mix pellets. Many people use beet pulp or rice bran, but those two by-products have very heavy pesticide levels, and most beets are now GMO. Fats. Horses do not usually require high amounts of fat in their diet and green grass will supply all the fatty acids that they need. Non-grazing horses should probably receive a supplement to provide the necessary Omega-3 fatty acids. Our absolute favorite is Chia seeds, which can be fed without any worry about preparation or safety. Other suitable products include whole extruded soybeans which must be properly prepared, whole fresh-ground flax seed, or a stabilized flax seed meal fed in small amounts. We recommend that you avoid feeding liquid vegetable oils in general to horses and to yourself, except for olive oil and coconut oil.

VITAMINS AND MINERALS: If your horse lives on an organic pasture with grass and herbs grown in virgin soil that produces plant life with correct nutrient values, it may not be necessary to provide supplements. However, over-farming, over-grazing, pesticides, chemicals, harsh fertilizers and acid rain have all contributed to a decline in nutrient values of our soils. Ideally have your pasture and hay analyzed to determine your area’s deficiencies. Once you know your hay’s deficiencies, you can look for a supplement that will complement that. Find a nutritionist to help you with this. As a precaution against over-supplementation always choose chelated mineral supplements, which are better absorbed and handled in the body. Additionally chelation prevents a mineral from interacting with other minerals and causing problems. Free-choice minerals can be provided to the horse either routinely or with free access at all times. Although their use is debated, there is anecdotal evidence that horses can regulate their minerals and we have had good experiences with high quality free-fed minerals within a complete supplement program. Provide free choice plain loose salt at all times for all horses.

OTHER SUPPLEMENTS: Probiotics. Use a probiotic or prebiotic daily. It is cheap insurance for keeping your horse’s digestion in top condition. It is indispensable for horses that are stressed, underweight, going through changes such as de-shoeing and de-toxing, any horse prone to colic or digestive upsets, and even for the easy-keeper whose system may not really be working correctly. It works! We also recommend that you feed your horse fresh food as often as possible. Besides the standard carrots and apples (keep quantities small for overweight horses), offer vegetables, fruits and very small amounts of nuts and seeds. Beyond these basics, supplements become a very individualized situation. We always prefer to keep it as simple as possible. We provided the above information in a generic format, without reference to specific brands. With that in mind, we feel there are two general overall approaches to nutrition: scientific and analytical or intuitive and artistic. If you love graphs and grids and flow charts, you might really enjoy going the scientific and analytical direction with graphs and lots of numbers to crunch. The second approach will appeal to you if you are interested in learning techniques like muscle testing, testing reflex points, and other ways to gain insight into what your horse needs nutritionally.

 

HHC 1 2017Our shining HHC students on their final day of class!  Thanks, everyone, for contributing your projects and ideas!  The equine community is a better place because of each and every one of you!

Thanks again, Asila and Keli, for such a wonderfully thorough project!

 

Sharing Projects From our Stellar HHC! Equine Massage – an in-depth look…

 

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Our own 2017 HHC students, Gretchen H. and Heather H. of CO, chose to do a thorough investigation of Equine Massage Therapy.  We invite you to peruse their material and find all the necessary research done in advance!

WHAT?

Equine massage therapy is the assessment of the soft tissues and joints and the treatment or prevention of physical dysfunction and pain of the soft tissues and joints by manipulation to develop, maintain, rehabilitate, or augment physical function and or relieve pain.

Equine massage therapists manipulate the soft tissues of the body (muscle, connective tissue, tendons, ligaments and skin) through the application of varying degrees of pressure and movement.Massage therapy may include many techniques such as Swedish massage, sports massage, myofascial release, trigger point therapy, acupressure, and other bodywork approaches. The type of massage given typically depends on the horse’s needs & condition as well as the therapist’s training.When massage is used in conjunction with chiropractic and/or acupuncture and/or acupressure the benefits are increased.

Equine massage therapy is not a substitute for veterinary care.
The growing use of complementary therapies alongside conventional veterinary medicine represents a shift towards a more integrative approach to equine health care. The goal is to combine the best of both worlds, while considering all aspects of an animal’s health in their management.

Why?

Physical benefits of equine massage
• Aid in recovery from injury & reduce the chance from future injury (preventative therapy)
• Pain relief: it can be used to cause the body to release endorphins, which aide in pain relief & a sense of well-being
• Relief from restlessness and sleep disturbances
• Improved propioception (sense of the orientation of one’s limbs in space)
• More efficient movement
• Improved recovery time from workouts
• Improved posture, circulation, hair coat, & muscle tone
• Increased flexibility and range of motion
• Immune system support
• Injury prevention

Emotional benefits of equine massage:
• Improve overall disposition
• Increased sense of wellness
• Help relieve anxiety & aid in relaxation
• Promotes general sense of calming & reduction of stress
• Stress relief:help calm nervous horses or horses in unfamiliar surroundings and/or stressful conditions.

Physiological effects of massage (NBCAAM*)
• Increases circulation of blood and other body fluids
• Releases endorphins (natural pain killers)
• Increases the excretion of toxins
• Relaxes muscle spasms/relieves tension
• Alleviates stiffness and restores mobility to injured tissues
• Prevents injuries and loss of mobility in potential trouble spots
• Increases range of motion
• Enhances muscle tone
• Increases flow of nutrients to muscles
• Reduces inflammation and swelling
• Lowers blood pressure
• Improves animal’s disposition
• Increases athletic performance
• Increases endurance
• Maintains overall physical condition

When?

The following symptoms can be signs that your horse is suffering from restricting muscular stiffness, painful muscle spasms, soft tissue adhesions or soreness:
• Limited range of motion, not fully engaging limbs, not stepping under, not extending
• Refusal to take a lead
• Unwilling to change gaits
• Horse hollows the back
• Horse throws head up during gait changes
• Horse looks ‘disconnected’ (hind and front not moving in unison)
• Bucking or crow hopping
• Not relaxing or rounding etc.

Symptoms that may indicate your hose would benefit from massage therapy:
• Irritable or bad disposition
• Head tossing
• Unexplained lameness
• Lead problems
• Shortened strides
• Loss of performance ability
• Head & neck discomfort
• Improper tracking
• Resistance to training
• Girthing or ‘cold back’ problems

How long before you see improvement?
Many horses show improvement with just one massage session. But each horse is different and depending on the issues at hand, may need several treatments before significant changes are observed.

Regular maintenance massage is a powerful preventative measure and a good way to help keep your horse healthy. Recommended maintenance regimen:
• To maintain the average horse in good condition, two sessions per month.
• For working horses weekly sessions to maintain optimum performance and recovery from workouts.

A horse that is massaged on a regular basis is less likely to develop painful muscle spasms, restrictions in soft tissue and effected joints and resulting performance limitations.

DO NOT massage if (NBCAAM)*:
• Horse is in shock: shock lowers blood pressure; massage lowers even more
• Horse has fever: fever is body’s way to fight infection; massage could elevate fever
• Horse has cancer: massage could spread the condition (get approval from veterinarian   first)
• Horse has open wounds: do not massage these areas
• Horse has torn muscles, tendon, ligaments: massage only after veterinary approval due to increased risk of inducing bleeding
• Horse has skin problems like ringworm: massage could cause it to spread
• Acute stages of diseases (i.e., equine influenza)

Who?

What to look for in choosing your equine massage therapist:
• Are they certified?
• How long did they study and where?
• Do they have good knowledge of anatomical form and function?
• Do they have good horse handling skills?
• Are they supported by other Equine Care Professionals?
• What results are expected from a course of treatments?
The effectiveness of the equine massage therapy is dependent upon:
• Correct evaluation
• Use of proper techniques
• Skill level and experience of the practitioner

How?

Equine Massage: A Practical Guide (Howell Equestrian Library)by Jean-Pierre Hourdebaigt.
The Basic Principles of Equine Massage/Muscle Therapy, Equine Massage, Horse Massage Paperback by Equine Therapist Mike Scott.
Videos on youtube.com, horsechannel.com, & other sites

ROTH DVD In Partnership with Horses includes an equine massage therapy demonstration from Ronald Bouchard of Equissage. He offers these three tips:
1. Observe your horse. Pay attention to what your horse is trying to tell you and listen to your horse. A change in performance and/or behavior may be because something hurts.
2. Regularly check your horses back, especially where the saddle sits.
3. Make sure your horse is happy before beginning (i.e., a trail ride, competition, work, etc.) and as needed use massage to relax the horse before starting.
http://www.equissage-ne-ny.com/index.html

Case studies http://www.equissage-ne-ny.com/cases.html

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For reference:

*National Board of Certification for Animal Acupressure & Massage (NBCAAM) purpose is to establish and uphold professional standards for animal acupressure and massage practitioners. http://www.nbcaam.org/

American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Scope of Practice: Complementary and Alternative Veterinary Medicine (CAVM) and other practice act exemptions
https://www.avma.org/Advocacy/StateAndLocal/Pages/sr-cavm-exemptions.aspx

COLORADO Animal massage – any person may perform massage on an animal if the person does not prescribe drugs, perform surgery, or diagnose medical conditions and has earned a degree or certificate in animal massage from an approved school.

 

Thanks, Gretchen and Heather, for choosing such a great topic on behalf of educating others in support of their horses!

HHC 1 2017

Photo of our 2017 HHC Part 1 students!

 

 

 

 

The 2017 HHC Journeys to the Crystal Show in Denver, CO!

Holistic Health Support and Healing are a signature part of the HHC, and ROTH was fortunate this year that one of the largest crystal shows in the US coincided with the course.  Some of our students chose to do their presentation on several crystals that spoke to them on a spiritual level.  Below is a list of the crystals and some of the more prominent aspects and healing properties associated with each.

Which crystals speak to you spiritually?  Have you used crystals before on either horses or yourself?  If so, which ones and what was your experience?  Feel free to share your comments on our Facebook page that accompanies this post!

 

Apophyllite

Apophyllite

Keywords: Spiritual Connection and Meditation

A crystal of facilitating and strengthening consciousness. Apophyllite brings high energy to mystical and other endeavors.  When placed on the third-eye chakra, it can help one see the truth for use in spiritual growth and connection.

Mental and Emotional Health– It is used to help one see the truth and then act on it.  It assists one in an ability to see and comprehend their own behaviors and attitudes that fearful avoidance may have kept hidden.  With the new self-awareness, one can find a way to move forward in both their practical life and spirituality.

 

Amethyst

Amethyst

Keywords: Psychic and Sobriety

Amethyst is a meditative and calming stone that works on the emotional, spiritual, and physical areas to promote calm, balance, and peace.  It is used to eliminate impatience.  It can increase spirituality and enhance intuition and psychic powers.

Mental and Emotional Health– It is used to help heal personal losses and grief.  It has a gentle energy that can promote peacefulness, happiness and contentment.  It brings emotional stability and inner strength to be strong in one’s life, enhancing flexibility and cooperation.

 

Cobaltian CalciteCobaltian Calcite

Keywords: Healing the heart, harmony and friendship

Cobaltian Calcite is a crystal of joy.  It is excellent for use with the heart chakra and can aid in releasing buried emotions.  It is uplifting and will encourage us to think positively and let go of the negative feelings onto which one may be holding.

Mental and Emotional Health– It can give one an enhanced awareness of one’s own body language and brings increased harmony to people or groups working with each other.  It also helps to form friendships and may facilitate in raising consciousness.

 

Fluorite

fluorite

Fluorite is a highly protective and stabilizing stone, useful for grounding and harmonizing spiritual energy.  When working with the upper Chakras, Fluorite increases intuitive abilities, links the human mind to universal consciousness, and develops connection to Spirit.  Fluorite further anchors intuitive insights into the physical plane, allowing mental and physical coordination.  A popular stone among energy healers, Fluorite can also clear the aura of mucky energies.

Physical Health- Physically, Fluorite is known to strengthen bones and teeth, and ameliorate the pain associated with arthritis.  Fluorite is also used to enhance mental functions by balancing the chemistry in the brain.

 

Rose Quartz

Rose Quartz

 

Rose Quartz has a pink hue due to several minerals including manganese and titanium. Physical features: known as a heart and circulatory tonic, and it improves circulation.

Physical Health-  Best for injuries and wounds but will also reduce stress.  Very good as a water stone.  It promotes the balance of all bodily functions especially when combined with amethyst and rock crystal.

 

Moon Stone

Moon stone

Moon Stone is a stone of protection, especially during childbirth, pregnancy, and travel at sea. It is a stone of calm and relief from emotional stress. It is also associated with love of all kinds.

Physical Health– Physically, Moon Stone is used in crystal healing to aid the pituitary gland and digestive system, obesity,  water retention, hormonal problems, and menstrual problems.

 

Black Tourmaline

black tourmaline

Black Tourmaline- Black Tourmaline keeps an electric charge, as it is pyroelectric (meaning it can generate electricity when heated), as well as piezoelectric (meaning it can store an electrical charge), causing it to release negative ions and far infrared radiation – these are very beneficial for health. This incredible stone is associated with protection, grounding, health, happiness, luck, and positivity.

Spiritual- Considered to be one of the most powerful protective stones. Heals on all levels- physical, emotional, mental and spiritual.

 

Labradoritelabradorite

Labradorite- A stone of transformation, Labradorite is a useful companion through change, imparting strength and perseverance. It balances and protects the aura, raises consciousness and grounds spiritual energies. Excellent for strengthening intuition and promoting psychic abilities.

Spiritual- Stone of transformation. Grounds spiritual energies and grounds and protects the aura.

 

Smokey Quartz

smokey quartz

Smokey Quartz– In addition to the generic healing properties of Quartz, Smokey Quartz is an excellent grounding stone. It gently neutralizes negative vibrations and is detoxifying on all levels, prompting elimination of the digestive system and protecting against radiation and electromagnetic smog.

Spiritual- Grounding and neutralizes negative vibrations.

 

 

The Equine Chakras

 

 

a_Horse_Chakras_Pic for BLOG 3

 

This presentation belongs to ROTH’s own Shantel S. of the UK, and Gina K., Laura Z., and Kate F. of CO.  Thanks, ladies, for sharing your work with us to help educate and inspire others!

HHC 1 2017

Photo of our own 2017 HHC students on trailer loading day!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Excalibur Update and Dynamite Success!

 

Many of you have followed along as we’ve seen our beloved Excalibur through a bout of laminitis. Here, Anna is adding Dynamite Supplements to Ex’s (and the rest of the herd’s) supper.  Through supplementation, booting, cold hosing and more, Ex is recovering. If you’d like to learn more about Dynamite and the wonderful family of supplements for animals and people, click the link below. If you’d like to know more about how we have cared for Ex, please email us at info@reachouttohorses.com.

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While in the Northeast, Anna spent an evening helping people learn about Dynamite Nutritional Products and the value she’s personally seen them bring to her clients, students, family and the animals they all love!

“Thank you to Anna Twinney for orchestrating the assembly of a panel of holistic and veterinary experts at Ray of Light Farm.  Present for the discussion on the evening of July 12thwere Dr. Scott Sears from Connecticut Equine Clinic, Scott Lesinski, Cathy Languerand, and, of course, Anna (three Dynamite Distributors). The audience was made up of a variety of knowledge seekers ranging from people who have used Dynamite products to the very young group of volunteers who help us take care of the 150 (or so) animals who reside at our rescue/therapy center.” ~

Bonnie Buongiorne

Founder, Ray of Light Farm

Dynamite Distributor

SharedVision

Want to learn more about Dynamite? Click the link!

Animal Communication Reaches Out to the East Coast! Testimonials to share….

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Anna’s East Coast tour started with horsemanship in New York, and then she moved into Animal Communication in Connecticut.  She then returned to New York for more Communication Sessions at For the LOVE of Dogs.  Truly it was a couple weeks that all enjoyed and from which each person took away new wisdom.

Above:  An Image of our students at Ray of Light Farms in East Haddam, CT along with the testimonials they share:

Shannon D. of Clinton, CT

This weekend gave me confidence in my own intuition by being able to ask questions and get confirmed answers rather than just feeling my way through a communication.

Laurie R. of West Suffield, CT

Love in its many forms was the theme of this incredible, 3-day seminar in Animal Communication.  Lovingly partnering with animals to really see them and hear their messages.  I learned so much about myself and what it takes to truly listen to the animals.

Christine R. of Bethany, CT

Anna is a master teacher – she can direct questions to a student, which causes her to dig deeper into what she has just observed and learned and helps to integrate the learning into practice.  Thanks and love….

Elaine S. of Quaker Hill, CT

I came to the workshop with no expectations, having never been around horses, thinking that this may be just about listening to instruction and not implementing it.  What I found was that this was very emotional for me in so many ways – a lot of tears – openly coupled with amazing realizations about myself – most of all.  In the end – I’m in the way – get into my heart and out of my mind.  Bless you, Anna Twinney, for your gift and for your ministry.

Amy W.J. of Waterbury, CT

This class has given me the confidence and validation I needed to continue my animal journey.  Anna is a wealth of knowledge that I have never gotten from any other animal communication class.  Thank you!

Cathy L. of East Haddam, CT

My heart feels hugged and embraced by like-minded people.  This clinic helped me embrace myself as a Reach Out to Horses Instructor, and helped me understand the importance of blending animal communication into my life.

Dora R. of Eastover, SC

What a profound experience.  Being reminded that I do have the ability to communicate with animals.  The profound experience came when a dog I was speaking to brought a human in from the other side.  Giving that message was so precious and moving.

Anna then traveled to Centerline Stables in Ossining, NY, and shared more communication with the people, horses and dogs who call Centerline their home!

 

And from Sharon M. of For the Love of Dogs at Centerline Stables:

Anna has been coming to Centerline Stables for something like fifteen years, and over the last three years she has been splitting her time in service to both the horses here as well as the rescue dogs who live on the property under the care of For the LOVE of DOGS Rescue.  She helps us help our dogs in many ways, primarily by giving voice to certain dogs’ needs, wishes, and requests through individual communications, and by providing wisdom and guidance to all of the humans who are responsible for these dogs’ well being and future adoption placement.

During her latest visit, a young female yellow lab mix named Gemmie gave a clear explanation of the type of home environment she wanted – a large open farmstead on which she can move in and out with one or two male dogs her size.  She showed herself as a good listener who would always be attentive to her people, and she took comfort in knowing that they would be there checking in with her as she moved around with a sense of freedom and spaciousness.  Giving Gemmie this voice helps us tremendously because we have an understanding her ideal home straight from her.  It also gives another perspective of who she is beyond her typical behavior at the rescue and helps to broaden our minds to what could be possible now and in the future.

Also during this visit, Anna led a workshop for us that focused on awareness of energy, the differences between each person’s and dog’s energetic qualities, and the impact of the ever-present language of energy.  We used cotton balls in an exercise to learn to quiet the mind and to feel.  We felt and shared each person’s unique energetic qualities, including nurturing, grounded and reliable, sensitive and small, uplifting and powerful, loving, and confident and controlling.  In becoming better attuned to our own particular energy qualities and how these interact with others around us, we also discussed the significant impact of congruence of energy, intent, and body language when working with dogs.  Even if we approach the excitable dog with indirect body language and a calm voice, a person with uplifting and powerful energy may unintentionally excite that dog.  A shy, untrusting dog may remain defensive when greeted with structured or controlling energy, but open up in the presence of nurturing energy.  This awareness and knowledge is huge as we strive to strengthen the effectiveness of our daily communication between human and canine beings.  A giant thank you to Anna from all of us – canine, equine, and human – at LoveDogs and Centerline!

Thanks go to all of the participants on Anna’s clinics, two-legged and four-legged!  Without your dedication to giving a voice to the voiceless and to learning the art of Animal Communication, none of this would be possible!  We greatly appreciate your participation!  Love, blessings and light to all!  We LOVE your hearts and souls!

 

 

A Blending of Two Worlds to Create Symbiosis on Behalf of the Horses

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The Blending of Two Worlds

Thank you to Anna Twinney for orchestrating the assembly of a panel of holistic and veterinary experts at Ray of Light Farm.  Present for the discussion on the evening of July 12thwere Dr. Scott Sears from Connecticut Equine Clinic, Scott Lesinski, Cathy Languerand, and, of course, Anna (three Dynamite Distributors). The audience was made up of a variety of knowledge seekers ranging from people who have used Dynamite products to the very young group of volunteers who help us take care of the 150 (or so) animals who reside at our rescue/therapy center.

Ray of Light Farm is a Dynamite Barn and a Dynamite distributor, and we also rely heavily on the advice of our veterinary team to keep our animals in good health. As the caretaker of so many animals, I often find it confusing trying to blend the two worlds. It was enlightening to hear the many experiences the distributors had in the field with equines, but also important to this meeting was adding the knowledge of the physiological effects, an explanation of how some of the products work in the body and why they are necessary.  In a discussion with Dr. Sears after the meeting, he affirmed the statement that horses do not normally need grain, it’s more of a tradition than a need. But they do need a strong foundational program such as the one designed by Dynamite: Dynapro, Vitamins, and free choice minerals.

From my perspective, there are three things that I took away from this evening.

  • The comfort level that our veterinarian is a team player that I can openly discuss our nutritional and first aid plans with.
  • The absolute law that, as a responsible horse person, the job of diagnosis belongs to the medical professionals.
  • The necessity of a partnership between Veterinary professionals and Dynamite distributors.

I cannot think of a larger way to benefit our clients and the animals that we all love.

With gratitude to all who participated,

Bonnie Buongiorne

Founder, Ray of Light Farm

Dynamite Distributor

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Do you share a passion for Holistic Health?  Visit Anna’s Dynamite Page and read on about the multiple benefits of doing life the Dynamite way!

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