Welcome to the Reach Out to Horses® Blog!

Welcome to our little corner of the Blogosphere.   Stop by often to get great tips and information on all things natural horsemanship, animal communication, energy healing, and more.  You can also keep up with all we have going on as Anna travels around the globe teaching her methodologies of trust-based communication.

And of course we want to hear from you. So please comment on those posts that are important to you, share your experiences and let our community get to know who you are.

We look forward to blogging with ya, so check back soon!

Help to Preserve a Legacy!

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Have you ever had a dream where you were standing before a wild, untouched, untamed horse; a majestic, powerful, intelligent being.  You have no ropes, no chutes, no intention to force him into submission.  Instead, you have communication, mutual respect, and trust;  a trust that you have spent time building… together.  
Finally, feeling the time is right, you reach out… waiting… and this wild heart in front of you says, “Yes”, comes forward, and allows you, a human, to touch him for the first time.  You feel the connection between the two of you and know that, through your efforts and your willingness to see him as he truly is and to be seen, you have created a genuine bond of trust and partnership.
Now know that this dream is not just fantasy but a reality that happens every year during our Reach Out to the Untouched Horse event.  Over the course of 7 life-changing days you will experience what real connection, communication and horsemanship is all about.  You will begin to see the world through the eyes of a wild horse.  As you learn their silent language, you’ll connect and experience what feels mystical and magical but is truly a learned skill that you will find useful for the rest of your life with all your horses, whether they be wild or domestic. 
You will discover how the natural horse communicates, herd dynamics, develop a bond through building a trust-based relationship.  You will uncover their motivation and learning styles, begin the training process, and socialize a group of untouched horses.  
 
You will also have the opportunity to visit the Nokota in their natural environment and witness firsthand the world of the wild horse. 
 
This experience is perfect for those who have recently fostered or adopted untouched horses. Don’t miss this rare chance to meet, work and learn from a truly beautiful representative of the wild, untamed world of Equus.
ABOUT THE HORSES YOU’LL BE WORKING WITH…
The Nokota horses descend from the last surviving population of wild horses in North Dakota. 
 
For at least a century, the horses inhabited the rugged Little Missouri badlands, located in the southwestern corner of the North Dakota and now you have the opportunity to experience these majestic beings up close.
When Theodore Roosevelt National Park was created in the 1950s, some of the wild bands were fenced in, an accident that proved to have far-reaching consequences. While the raising of federal fences provided the horses with a measure of protection, the National Park Service (NPS) does not allow wild or feral equines, and is exempt from related protective legislation. Consequently, the park spent decades attempting to remove all of the horses. 
During the 1980s, Frank and Leo Kuntz began purchasing horses after N.P.S. round-ups, named them “Nokotas,” and started to create a breed registry. Nokota horses are descended from the last surviving population of wild horses in North Dakota. 
Anna will guide you through the world of these unique and untouched horses as you learn the language of Equus, enter the magical domain of the wild horse and begin to understand their communication in the natural world.  
This is a unique opportunity to observe wild horses in their natural habitat. You will begin to understand real communication with the natural world, be introduced to herd dynamics and develop a bond through building a trust-based relationship. The young horses being socialized in this clinic have shown a natural desire to relate to humans. While striving to make their futures less traumatic for veterinary care, foster homes etc., these young horses will be your teachers.
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I love my horse, but he…___________!!

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Everyone has a vice, a quirk and horses are no different. 
Horses learn good behavior and they learn bad behavior, and they form habits, too. The difference is there aren’t bad horses, just horses with people problems.
So whether your horse bucks, bolts, rears or eats your mail as you walk through the barn with it … we will help you find the solution you need. 
This might be a cartoon, but often horses are innocently taught to “count,” to rear or any number of “tricks” that put an unsuspecting new owner in danger. Hercules can withstand a head butt from a draft horse, you probably won’t be so lucky! 
Dangerous or annoying habits, or simple holes in early training, can make working with some horses tricky.  We’ll help you understand their language, see the early signs of a developing issue that are usually missed, and give you the tools you need to have a strong bond with a foundation for communication, so … you know… you horse doesn’t try to High Five you or run you under a low branch.

 

Picking up feet & Farrier preparation

  • Teaching to tie   
  • Fear of Vaccinations
  • Pushy
  • Leading Issues
  • Bathing
  • Farrier Prep
  • Bombproofing
  • Ropes
  • Catching
  • Mustangs
  • Worming
  • Sheath Cleaning
  • Food Aggression
  • Lacking Balance
  • Herd Bound
  • Trailer Loading
  • Balking
  • and more!!

During this very unique event Anna will show you how to see the signs of developing issues, communicate effectively with your horse and solve all of your problems… well… at least all of your horse problems.

“In a world where you can be anything, be kind.”

Maya and sunshine.jpgOn January 1, 2015-New Year’s Day-a family of horses including two young fillies, were rescued from the Sunnyside Lot in Washington State. At that time, I was the Equine Program Director at Zuma’s Rescue Ranch and remember hearing about the “ponies” and the details on several of them coming to Colorado to find their forever homes. Due to many unexpected circumstances, including respiratory sickness, gelding, and homes falling through, they did not make it to Colorado in early 2015 as planned.

In August, 2015 I relocated to Oregon and received a call from Zuma’s Rescue Ranch stating that the father, Zumba, and the filly sisters were now located at a rescue in central Oregon. The founder of this rescue had passed away suddenly and the ponies were in desperate need of training to help them find their forever homes. I reached out to the rescue, who was very grateful for support and help with the ponies, and began organizing acquiring panels with which to build training areas. Given the devastating situation at the rescue, I also collaborated with Zuma’s Rescue Ranch on fundraising for dental work for Zumba and two other adult horses on the property.

I met the sisters shortly before finishing my case studies for the Reach Out To Horses® Trainers program, and was thinking they would be great additions to my untouched horse case studies. My plan was to take the next six days to gentle the girls, pushing myself to work a little more quickly than my typical pace. As I discovered during our assessment session, these were not the horses to work with any sort of timeline or agenda. It became clear very quickly that the girls had experienced a lot of trauma in their short lives.

The younger sister, later named Sunshine, was wearing a halter when I met her, but not on her terms as she was not yet gentled. When we began, she would interact with me for short periods of time before getting upset–resulting in ear pinning, teeth baring, and spinning to kick. She was living alone and had been pacing so frequently that she had dug herself a hole at one end of her paddock.

The older sister was even more fearful. On our first day of training, she trembled when I stepped into the 40ft round pen she was living in. She lowered her head and would not make eye contact. It took the better part of 20 minutes to gently encourage her to leave the round pen and go into the training area. I placed food into her training area to help provide comfort, and just being in the smaller area with me on the outside became our first “lesson”.

Over the next few months we worked on her claustrophobia, fear of gates clanging and other loud noises, extreme fear of any kind of rope, whip or stick being near her, and tolerating human presence in a confined space. We built up trust and our relationship, with her turning to face me and staying soft when I entered her area, reaching out to my hand for a greeting with her nose, as well as her first touch. During our few months in training at the Oregon rescue, we had powerful communication and healing sessions together, including her sharing with me she would now like to be called “Maya”. This little horse, despite her fear of humans, started to trust me enough to allow some Equine CranioSacral and Reiki from a distance, and she began to communicate with me in short, clear messages. One of our more powerful communication sessions came right before her first touch. Here is the excerpt from her training journal on that day:

 “Tears brought to my eyes today as “sister” accepted her first touch by choice. Moments before our first touch I heard loud and clear in my head, “Namaste,” to which I replied, “Namaste.” There is so much fear in the world for this little horse due to force and violence; yet, she has chosen to trust me on this path. “

—-The spirit in me salutes the spirit in you—

It became clear to me as I worked with these girls, that if they were to make a fully recovery they needed to be much closer to me so we could work together on a daily basis. By networking with another local Oregon rescue, Mustangs To The Rescue (MTTR) and Zuma’s Rescue Ranch in Colorado, we were able to transport Zumba to MTTR to complete his rehabilitation and training. Maya and Sunshine were able to relocate to the property that I am working out of in Bend, Oregon as Renegade Equine.

We fundraised jointly for the materials to build a shelter and the property owners donated boarding costs. Through the generosity of people across the country and funding from Zuma’s Rescue Ranch, Maya and Sunshine’s feed, supplements, and medical needs have been fully sponsored for the last six months.

Once Maya and Sunshine settled in together at Renegade Equine (boy, were they excited to see one another after being separated for several months and living alone), the intensive rehabilitation began in earnest. In addition to my daily training, there have been a few amazing volunteer healers and trainers who have supported their recovery and training. During the winter and spring months we implemented the following to aid in healing both physical and emotional aspects of trauma: Bach Flower Essences in their water 3-4 times per day, customized herbal blends, herbal de-wormers and conventional feed through pelleted de-wormers, clicker training, essential oils, omega 3/6 support, probiotics, natural ulcer treatments, daily whole food mashes, Reach Out To Horses® methodology, Reiki, CranioSacral bodywork, Dynamite Specialty  Products, and region specific vitamin and mineral supplementation.

I attempted to integrate the ponies into my longstanding balanced herd to aid in the whole horse healing process, but unfortunately, Maya became very aggressive with the other horses. The girls are living separately for everyone’s safety.

Around the end of February, I began to notice that Maya was packing feed in her mouth and was unable to chew hard foods easily. By now, Sunshine had been fully gentled and was coming along beautifully. However, even with consistent and compassionate training and a thorough “whole horse” healing approach, Maya was not yet haltered–making it difficult to get her necessary medical treatment. I began discussions with a few mentors and colleagues regarding the ethics of utilizing a chute to help move Maya along so we could get the dental treatment she needed. We decided that if we could build a safe chute, and also train her to be comfortable in it using the methods we were already implementing, that this would be a viable option to help Maya.

Now, I want to say that using a chute is not something I was comfortable with for many reasons, but over time, I was able to talk through my concerns, and create a training plan to keep Maya safe, emotionally and physically.

As luck would have it, my parents were visiting around this time. My dad is very handy and helped turn my ideal chute into a reality. He engineered and built the structure, leaving me to finish the padding for added protection. I worked on getting Maya comfortable in it when it was open, then with walls, then with the front closed while continuing to work with her in a small training area. I had not yet completed the material for our chute, but one day when I got to the barn I kept getting mental pictures of Maya in a halter and they just didn’t stop coming. That day she was exceptional in our sessions together, allowing more touch on more areas of her body then ever before. The next day a healer friend who had been working with the girls consistently came for a session. One of the first things out of her mouth was, “I think you are going to get the halter on today!”

Maya and sunshine 2

“Funny you say that… I’ve been getting pictures of the same thing,” I replied. That day we made continued progress in that direction with Maya allowing more work with the rope, movement of the rope, and things near her head than ever before. The following day was magic and in a very short period of time, Maya accepted her first halter.

I had thought I was a patient person, but Maya showed me how much more patient I could become. How much softer I could become. How much more thorough in my horsemanship and holistic care for horses I could become. Maya showed me that my awareness of my intention and body language could be even more fine-tuned, that I could commit myself more than I thought possible, and she helped me bring together a holistic community that I didn’t think was here in Central Oregon. She helped me believe in myself a little bit more, and in return I offered her the same gift… that she could believe in herself a little bit more, and have the courage to trust in the transformation.

I want to thank Zuma’s Rescue Ranch for their continued support of Maya and Sunshine’s care (go to zumasrescueranch.com for more information or to donate to the girls’ ongoing care), Mustangs To the Rescue for their commitment and support of the girls’ sire, Zumba (please visit mustangstotherescue.org) and Reach Out To Horses® (please visit reachouttohorses.com)  for continuing to educate people and advocate for horses.

Please share this story so these beautiful ponies can find their forever homes. For more information on Maya and Sunshine, or Renegade Equine, contact Katie Dixon at renegade.equine@gmail.com or renegadeequine.com.

 

 

Animal Communicator, Anna Twinney, Gives Voice to Wild Mustang Living in Captivity

JP Chance and Major

White Stallion Ranch sponsored the adoption of a wild mustang on January 8th to participate in Arizona’s Extreme Mustang Makeover.  JP Dyal had 104 days to train a horse captured from a band of Mustangs in Nevada and trucked to a BLM holding facility in Arizona, where he lived for the next 3 years.

The horse was randomly assigned from the holding pens on adoption day.  For the first few days he stood in the round pen surrounded by ranch activity, calmly taking it all in.  Each night, JP would sleep in the round pen on a cot which bonded them quickly. JP named him Chance, saying “this is his second chance at a good life.”

It was immediately apparent that Chance was a very unusual horse. JP started his training on day 2 and Chance responded well to everything that was asked of him. He was willing and trusting and you could actually see him processing information.

Anna Twinney, an internationally respected Animal Communicator offers workshops at White Stallion Ranch. We asked if she would communicate with Chance; to ask if he was comfortable in his new life or if he was missing his band and his freedom on the open range. We also wanted to know if there was anything we could do to shape his future, make his life with usbetter and somehow make up for the trauma caused by humans.

What follows is a summary of the communication between Chance and Anna as she shared it with us in real time via telephone:

JP, Carol and Susanne sit in Carol’s office at the speaker phone, Anna is on the line and explains briefly what to expect as she reaches out to Chance and begins her communication with him.  The line goes silent, we wait, and 10 minutes pass slowly as we wonder if we are still connected.  Anna begins speaking very quickly; we click on the recorder and start taking notes.   The session lasts 1 hour and 11 minutes; apparently Chance is quite willing to share his thoughts. 

Anna begins by describing images as they come to her; she refers to them as Chance showing himself and his surroundings. She speaks quickly and is not looking for validation – it is more like a stream of consciousness:

Chance indicates that the number 3 is significant – the last three years, which we know he spent in captivity, she sees images of the holding pens, the surrounding area as well as the men who work in the pens. We asked about his life in the wild and he shows her the open range,his early years in the band, his memories of being a bachelor, she sees that he did not run in a typical group of bachelors, he traveled alone.

Chance categorized his life in 3 chapters:

  1. living in the wild  –   a chapter of freedom and learning and growing
  2. holding pens – 3 years waiting, no learning, no shelter, no freedom
  3. being handed to JP –  he feels he  “found his person” 

He takes life in stride and accepts each chapter for what it is, he adapts and sees life as the glass is full and overflowing, he wants to be JP’s horse for life,he enjoys the partnership, he is insightful and he appreciates JP.  He doesn’t have any baggage and he hasn’t allowed his past to shape his future – he is only interested in what the future holds. 

 He does not blame or dislike humans for what happened to him.

Anna describes in great detail the entire training processJP has taken him through.His training was very fast and he is very accepting of what JP asks of him, he works very hard to process it and understand it.

He shows riding in the desert, the ranch rodeo, trailering and practicingmounted shooting, he indicates that he is aware of the upcoming competition,  and he has overheard conversations  that he may not be coming home with JP  after the competition.

He is not being broken, he is being started – his spirit has not been broken, he sees JP as his master and he is willing to partner with him.  He will do whatever JP asks of him on the day of the event.  He comprehends the dilemma – the better they perform, the higher his price will go, he knows JP wants to show him off and demonstrate his training skills, but it will push the bids up ~ making it harder for JP to buy him and bring him home.

JP asks if he would like to be a performance horse (Mounted Shooting) and he shows Anna that he doesn’t really want to, he envisions them riding together but not performing – it looks more like they are wrangling or leading rides.

JP asks why Chance is so trusting, and Anna says it is in his DNA, he is able to put his past completely behind him and move forward with full trust and willingness.

In closing, Anna notes that no matter what the future holds for Chance, he will excel at whatever is asked of him, because he will adapt to any circumstances.

While it is clear that Chance is no ordinary horse, it’s a valuable lesson to learn that wild horses do not all fit neatly into a category any more than domesticated horses. There are good and bad, willing and stubborn in both cases, and we are sincerely amazed at the incredible little Mustang we received from the BLM.   If you or anyone you know is considering an adoption we strongly encourage you to give one of these magnificent horses a “chance.”

For further information on consultations, webinars and the animal communication ranch retreat with Anna in November 2016 visit reachouttohorses.com

CONTACT: Susanne Walsh, White Stallion Ranch, Tucson, AZ
info@whitestallion.com ~ 520-297-0252

Young Living Executive!

We are proud to announce that Anna has been promoted to the rank of Young Living Executive!image004-1

Have a Life Changing Summer with ROTH!

Join us this summer for these unique natural horsemanship opportunities to discover, enhance and evolve both personally and professionally.  For two decades Anna has teamed up with rescues in support of their mission to save, rehabilitate and train horses naturally, thus providing another chance for horses in every capacity. ROTH’s gentle communication and connection supports horses without force and provides a personal fundamental foundation.
Our 3-style approach takes care of your needs:
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Learn About the ROTH Difference

#1

We invite EVERYONE to join us on this adventure.  Although we recommend prerequisites our primary reason behind this decision is to offer a successful experience for all.  You may be:
 
*A natural!
*Offering a home to a foal, mustang, wild horse or rescue/rehab horse
*seeking to improve your existing knowledge
*Looking for a better solution
*Opening a new equine business, learning center, rescue or sanctuary
*A professional or clinician in the field adding to your repertoire
*Looking to fulfill a life-long dream!
 
We recommend you view our extensive video library on youtube and suggest you purchase the DVD pertaining to the clinic of choice and/or attend a clinic in your area in preparation to this life-changing event.

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Keys to Success Start Here

#2

Professionals in the equine industry and ROTH HHC graduates are invited to participate in all 4 courses and the trainer’s exam to receive our ROTH trainer’s certificate of completion. Simply take part in this cutting edge program and receive recognition from an internationally recognized organization.

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Help them start on the right hoof!

#3

ROTH Holistic Horse Graduates apply for the trainer’s course opportunity to become a certified ROTH trainer over a 2-year period.  Upon completion of the ROTH certificate all trainers are eligible to carry the ROTH name and logo representing ROTH globally.   Special recognition, support, benefits and offers apply.

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The Experience of a Lifetime

 

10 Years of Gentling Wild Horses with ROTH!

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Imagine being pulled out of your home, away from your family and friends and taken to an unknown place where you are introduced to foreigners who do not speak your language. This is exactly what these symbols of freedom so often experience. By understanding and attuning to these magnificent creatures, and seeing the world through their eyes, you will begin to master their language. You will learn how to socialize them, create trust & value in a relationship and identify their motivation & learning styles. This class is ideal for those who have recently fostered or adopted untouched horses and can be arranged in your area.

Immerse yourself in a 7-day workshop. This is a unique opportunity to observe wild horses in their natural habitat. You will begin to understand non-verbal communication with the natural world, be introduced to herd dynamics and develop a bond through building a trust-based relationship. The young horses being socialized in this clinic have come to the class through various rescue situations. They have shown a natural desire to relate to humans. To make their futures less traumatic for veterinary care, foster homes etc, these young horses will be your teachers.

Follow the link to sign up today!

http://www.reachouttohorses.com/training.html#gentling

 

Anna is Headed to Montana!

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The Details! 
June 25th: 
Day 1: “The Obstacle Course at Liberty”: Saturday, June 25th, 2016
If you have been searching for a more evolved horsemanship method, if you want to take your skills and your relationship with your horse to a deeper level, you have come to the right place.
We aren’t going to waste any time. On the first day you are “jumping into the deep end” of equine communication! The obstacle course is one of the most effective tools in horsemanship and you will join your equine partner at liberty. You will learn how to communicate effectively with your horse, truly gaining the partnership and connection needed for anything you do together. It is a wonderful way to take your partnership to a much deeper level and have some fun. It is also a true test of that partnership. It’s a time to strip you of all paraphernalia, connect through an unspoken language, and explore your horses’ true voice!

Day 2: “Round Pen: Connection & Communication”: Sunday, June 26th, 2016
With the unique ROTH methodologies and use of the round pen, you will witness the effectiveness of this often misunderstood and misused method of training. Anna will introduce you to the subtleties of the horse’s communication system, a language that goes beyond body gestures and physical cues. You will learn to create a lexicon that can be used in and out of the Round Pen.
Anna will also help you take your training, and the partnership with your horse to a whole new level as she shows you how to use the Round Pen for one of its most powerful uses – understanding and assessing your horse’s health, history, personality, character, and more.  Her unique method of using not only body language, but also energy and interspecies communication will reveal just how intelligent, aware, and communicative your horse really is!
On day 2 you will learn how to:

  • Create the ultimate foundation with your horse
  • Learn the importance of herd dynamics and behavior
  • Develop a 2-way conversation system
  • Uncover the Character, Personality, History, Psychology, (and more) of your horse
  • Understand when the Round Pen is NOT the right tool
  • Create a unique training program for your horse
  • And a whole lot more…

Day 3: “Refined in Hand Work and Confidence in the Saddle” : Monday, June 27, 2016
The obstacle course is one of the most effective tools in horsemanship and on the final day, you will work with your horse from the saddle to eliminate any concerns about spooking while you are on his back.
You will begin with Anna’s exclusive Trust-Based Learning and Compassionate Communication. This is the foundation of the ROTH program’s in-hand work… and there’s a reason for it. You will create a solid footing with your horse, set him up for success, and achieve that connection of grace and ease you’ve always imagined.
Say goodbye to frustration, struggle, confusion, misunderstanding, flaring tempers, fear and anxiety for both you and your horse. Instead, welcome to a new way of thinking, a new way of being.

Using Anna’s TLC methods you will be able to:

  • Understand the importance of intimacy and relaxation exercises and how to use them correctly
  • Overcome your horse’s challenging habits and behavior patterns
  • Prepare your young horse for his first saddle, bridle and rider
  • Desensitize your horse to common situations and tack
  • Prepare your horse for doctoring and medical examinations/emergencies
  • Earn your horse’s trust and learn how to continue to gain and build his trust
  • Develop methods to read your horse’s mood, personality, character, likes & dislikes
  • Create a toolbox to foster that perfect connection on a daily basis
  • And much more!

    Only $197 per day for the entire event if you register by
    May 15th! / $225 after May 15th

Register Now

 

Published in: on March 31, 2016 at 11:31 am  Leave a Comment  

BLM Announces Three Selections for National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board

The Bureau of Land Management announced today the selections for three open positions on its nine-member National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board.  Ginger Kathrens of Fort Collins, Colorado, has been appointed for the category of humane advocacy; Ben Masters of Bozeman, Montana, has been appointed for the category of wildlife management; and Steven Yardley of Beaver, Utah, has been appointed for the category of livestock management.  Each individual will serve a three-year term on the Advisory Board.

Ms. Kathrens is the Founder and Executive Director of the Colorado-based Cloud Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation of wild horses on public lands.  Kathrens is an Emmy award-winning creator of the acclaimed Public Broadcasting System series documenting the birth and life of a Pryor Mountains (Montana) wild stallion called “Cloud.”  Her first Cloud film was voted the most popular documentary in the 25-year history of the Nature series on PBS.  Kathrens is an honor graduate of Bowling Green State University and holds a Master of Art’s degree in Mass Communications from Florida State University.

Mr. Masters, founder and Chief Executive Officer of Fin & Fur Films, LLC is best known for his successful documentary Unbranded, an account of a 3,000-mile ride on wild horses that has raised awareness of the BLM’s adoption program and the myriad challenges facing public land managers.  Masters holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences from Texas A&M University.

Mr. Yardley, Vice President of Yardley Cattle Company, is a public land rancher and private landowner who holds grazing permits from the BLM and the U.S. Forest Service.  A graduate of Southern Utah University, Yardley has been active with the Future Farmers of America, Utah Cattlemen’s Association, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, and Southern Utah University’s Block and Bridle Club.  Currently, Mr. Yardley serves as Vice President of the Western Rangelands Conservation Association.

The National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board advises the BLM, an agency of the Interior Department, and the U.S. Forest Service, part of the Agriculture Department, on the management and protection of wild free-roaming horses and burros on public lands and national forests administered by those agencies, as mandated by the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act.  Members of the board, who represent various categories of interests, must have a demonstrated ability to analyze information, evaluate programs, identify problems, work collaboratively, and develop corrective actions.  (Information about the board can be found at: http://www.blm.gov/wo/st/en/prog/whbprogram/Advisory_Board.html.)

Among its current efforts to strengthen the Wild Horse and Burro Program, the BLM has been moving forward with a population-growth suppression strategy consistent with recommendations of a National Academy of Sciences study issued in June 2013.  The agency’s new population growth-suppression research, representing an investment of approximately $11 million in 20 research projects over five years, will focus on (1) developing longer-lasting fertility-control agents; (2) evaluating the safety, feasibility, and effectiveness of spaying and neutering on-range wild horses; and (3) implementing better methods for estimating wild horse and burro populations.  To achieve those aims, the BLM is working with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and five universities — the University of Kentucky, Oregon State University, Colorado State University, Ohio State University, and Louisiana State University.  Detailed information about each project has been posted on the agency’s Website (www.blm.gov).

Published in: on March 31, 2016 at 11:14 am  Leave a Comment  

A Few Quotes for Inspiration!

Published in: on March 31, 2016 at 11:04 am  Leave a Comment  
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