The First Hello

Coal was gathered from the Little Book Cliffs in October of 2018, recently brought to the BLM holding facility and onto auction. His first impressions with humans was unkind; losing his herd, home, and identity. He was adopted on Saturday, by a young lady named Jade, making her dreams come true. This was Coal’s first gentling session with Anna, his first hello and first impression. Less is more in the beginning. Quiet confidence while communicating with a gentle purpose are a few of the key elements to your relationship with a Mustang. “If you ever have the opportunity to spend a day with Anna Twinney, please do. When it comes to connecting with Mustangs she’s one of the very best.”

~ George Brauneis

Mustang Demo with Jade and Cole and Anna

Above, Anna instructs Jade with regards to the Mustang’s unique Language.

Watch below the video of Anna saying Hello to Coal for the first time.  Simply click on the video to watch.

Read the story of how Jade met Coal and the lengths she went to to bring him home with her in this article in The Daily Sentinel:

“During a hike with her grandmother in the Little Book Cliffs last March, Jade Walker caught sight of a magnificent wild horse — a blue-gray beauty with black marks and a long black mane.

The girl was thrilled when the horse came toward her a ways over a small hill. She, in turn, followed him back.

“I think we have a connection somewhere,” Jade said Saturday as the Mustang waited nearby in a pen with other wild horses.”

Read the Rest of the Story Here

Can you hear the call of the Wild Ones?

Only TWO SPOTS LEFT for this year’s Untouched Horse Course!

Final Mustangs 2019

Imagine being pulled out of your home, away from your family and friends, and taken to an unknown place where you are introduced to foreigners who do not speak your language. This is exactly what these symbols of freedom so often experience.

By understanding and attuning to these magnificent creatures, and seeing the world through their eyes, you will begin to master their language. You will learn how to socialize them, create trust & value in a relationship and identify their motivations & learning styles. This class is ideal for those who have recently fostered or adopted untouched horses and can be arranged in your area.

Immerse yourself in a 7-day workshop. This is a unique opportunity to observe wild horses in their natural habitat. You will begin to understand non-verbal communication with the natural world, be introduced to herd dynamics and develop a bond through building a trust-based relationship. You will not use chutes, ropes, or any other restraints to force the horse’s compliance. Instead, you will work one-on-one with the wild ones, gaining their trust, learning their language, and building a relationship and true partnership that you have always dreamed of but never knew was possible.

 

Take Me to the Wild Ones!

Atlantis is adopted, but not home just yet!

 

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Each year I travel to the U.S. to continue my studies in Holistic Horsemanship with Reach Out to Horses. This month I completed the ‘Foal Gentling’ course in Sherwood, Oregon at Wild Horse Mountain Ranch. The 10 tribal foals we were partnered with had been separated from their moms and orphaned; they are only 4 months old. Luckily they were rescued by the Warm Springs Horse Network and given a second chance, PTL!

I was paired with the littlest baby of the group, a sensitive boy who showed us very quickly how big his heart is and how brave he is. By day 3, I realized that I wasn’t over there just to learn about foals and the language of the horse but to meet a soul mate and help him live the life he envisions for himself. With the guidance of my mentors and a mind-blowing offer from an awesome lady, it became possible for me to adopt the little boy I worked with, Atlantis.

The awesome lady, Melody (who took on 3 other foals as well!!!), will be taking Atlantis and his friends home to live with her. This means driving them from Oregon to the East Coast i.e. across the whole of America. This will cost at least $500 per foal, not to mention their vet bills for health certificates to cross State lines. Once Atlantis has healed and grown a bit more, he will get to decide if he wants to come live with us in England (yes, he has a choice;)).

Kindly,

Romy K.

Nichole Brings Home Two Babies of Her Own After a Heartbreak and Loss

I signed up for the ROTH Foal Gentling Course after unexpectedly losing my beloved Clydesdale, Aramis. I had hoped to honor his memory and find a little bit of peace and healing. I certainly didn’t expect to feel an immediate bond with one of the foals! That first morning when I stood at the gate, watching the foals, the little liver chestnut picked up his head and stared right at me. I felt an instant connection, the same I had felt with Aramis. Then Anna chose him as my foal, the one with whom I would work for the week. I couldn’t believe it. By the second day of working with Quincy, I knew he was meant for me. I truly believe that Aramis guided me to the training so that Quincy and I could find each other. Aramis knew Quincy needed me and I needed him. The choice to bring home the Cremello girl, Ilse, happened gradually. I was so impressed with her gentle, steady nature and her intelligence. After listening to Anna’s stories of horses that didn’t have the right companionship growing up and how it affected them, I knew Quincy needed a friend. I felt Ilse would be a wonderful choice because her steady, quiet confidence would help Quincy find his. They make a wonderful pair. Ilse doesn’t push Quincy around and already Quincy looks to her when something makes him nervous. I feel so blessed to have connected with these two gentle souls and I look forward to many years of love, partnership, and companionship with them.

Quincy was the youngest of the 10 foals that participated in the ROTH gentling class. He is a beautiful liver chestnut with a white star and two white hind feet. He is curious and alert. He likes to watch what everyone is doing around him and is very playful. He will try to play with anything new you bring into his pen. He doesn’t spook easily but does lack confidence sometimes. His “sister” is helping with that.

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Ilse is a beautiful Cremello with light blue eyes. She is built like a little tank and has the most amazing mohawk. She is calm, steady, confident, and intelligent. She learns incredibly fast and seems unflappable. She is patient with Quincy and his antics. She is very mature for her age.

 

For all the videos of the Foals Course and more, go to our You Tube Channel and Discover why ROTH stands head and shoulders above the rest when it comes to gentle, compassionate, horsemanship: Go to the Reach Out to Horses You Tube Channel

Appreciation from the Wild Horse Sanctuary

Dear Anna,
 
I am so thankful that we found each other thru a DVD that you mailed to us 2 years ago.  Sarah Lockwood (one of your certified trainers) did an amazing job of getting us together. I learned so much in this 7-day Reach Out to Horses course about the horses and myself that this has changed me forever. I cannot begin to put into words how much it meant to me to see some of our really difficult wild mustangs reach out to us!  That has forever changed their lives and now they can build on trusting their two-legged partners. They allowed people to come into their space and trust us. All of us students gave these horses an amazing foundation at the pace the horse would accept and we all accomplished our goals in the end. Our success story is Cookie, a cute mustang, who was lucky enough to have worked with all of the students that week. She went to an amazing supporter of The Wild Horse Sanctuary, Barbara Webb. The other horses are still waiting on their life partners. We are enthusiastically looking forward to next year’s 7-day ROTH course at The Wild Horse Sanctuary in Shingletown, CA. I cannot only highly recommend this course to everybody, I would strongly suggest it to any horse lover wanting to take their knowledge to the next level.  You will learn so much about yourself and the horses that you will be a different person after this course for life. On behalf of our mustangs Spice, Dodger Dan, Gypsy, Crystal, Aisha, Ayla, Owen, Cookie and Dutch, we would like to thank you and all of the students who made a difference in their lives and gave them an amazing foundation.  Many lives were changed for the better in your week here.
 
Liz Juenke,
 
Saddle Horse Manager at the Wild Horse Sanctuary

Herd Deemed Too Big To Support… Needing Your Help to Secure Their Future

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http://rapidcityjournal.com/news/local/hundreds-of-sd-sanctuary-horses-impounded-future-uncertain/article_d39c6fc0-d2bb-5fea-bb9b-384ad470cdc3.html?utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=user-share

Please follow the link to read more about how you can help support these horses and their needs this winter.

 

The Importance of Having a Like-Minded Team

BY: Katie Dixon ~ Renegade Equine

In the fall of 2015, I was connected with a small but mighty rescue group called the Warm Springs Horse Rescue Network, who at the time had helped place over 500 foals in homes. This August, I was fortunate enough to coordinate and host the ROTH Foals Clinic in Sisters, Oregon. I was thrilled to bring the ROTH team of students and people who were interested together in central Oregon, as finding holistic and like-minded horsemanship had been a challenge.

 

The auditors, students, healers, rescue network, foals, and Anna (of course), contributed to a wonderful week of strong team building and brought awareness to holistic horsemanship in central Oregon, as well as connecting like-minded professionals living in the area .

 

Although we may be able to create positive change for our horses and clients on our own, it truly takes a whole-horse approach to be successful in rehabilitation of horses, or even if its not a rehabilitation case, to take them to the next level of physical health and performance.

 

It has taken a little over a year of stepping out of my introvert comfort zone and pushing myself to network with equine professionals to find and build my “dream team” here in Oregon.

 

The results of this year of work building connections and then hosting the clinic are multidimensional. This is the amazing holistic-minded equine team we have here in Oregon :

 

  • A barefoot trimmer who sees the whole horse and how to help them move better
  • Several body workers who can help the horse’s body release restrictions and move more fluidly, and also provide feedback as to how our physical conditioning plan is working from the body’s perspective
  • A few different veterinarians who are open to a holistic perspective or are practicing holistic medicine
  • Several saddle fitters who work to keep the horse and human comfortable to achieve their goals
  • A Nutrition expert to guide us through basic supplementation and feeding practices specific to our area
  • Quality hay providers
  • Local feed companies
  • A team of holistic trainers working together to better horse’s lives around us

 

Without permission from the horse and their human, the team isn’t able to get much done. It its inspiring to me, each day, when we give the horses we work with the ability to communicate and have an opinion about each aspect of their life how much information we are able to obtain.

 

You see, in order for harmony in your horse, you have to create harmony in your team. Some team members may have expertise in multiple areas, and each member of your team needs to be able to respectfully communicate and work together to help you accomplish your goals with your horse.

 

What I appreciate most about building a great team is having a community to discuss new cases with, and also having a group of people I can refer to that can be trusted and will be working for the good of the horse in their area of expertise.

It is our due diligence as equine professionals, to look at the information from our trusted team with open eyes and ears. We need to be willing to shift how we are approaching different aspects of our horse’s unique experience in the world. The balance of a horses psychological and physiological help depend on us being open to look at all areas of our horses lives: what we feed our horses, their living environment, what we ask them to do physically (and emotionally), how we balance their bodies, how we engage their minds, and how we support their growth.

 

When we utilize a multi-faceted approach, examined with a lens of honesty and integrity it is amazing how much we are able to help horses find balance and happiness in their lives.  When we are willing to communicate for the good of the horse with other professionals instead of pointing the finger of blame, we are able to solve the puzzle with that horse and help them to live a comfortable and happy life.

 

Although it takes some effort in networking, a little shedding of ego, a bit of rallying the troops so to speak to get “your team” built, I would encourage you to do so! ROTH as an approach to horsemanship encourages us to look at the whole horse when we are training, and there are some really great equine professionals out there who can help boost your team and ultimately help magnify the great work you are all already doing. We can only benefit from like-minded collaboration, and grow into more skilled and knowledgeable equine guardians.

 

You can’t go wrong having ROTH on your team!