News from our yearly visit to Steadfast Steeds in Glade Park, CO

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Would You Welcome Me Into Your Home?

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Affectionately named Scarface, a gorgeous Mustang needs help finding a home!

My name is Scarface.
I am a coming six-year-old Little Owyhee gelding.
Dark bay with a little star and otherwise no other white.
Gathered most probably while still with my mom and weaned subsequently by
the BLM.
I spent the next years in Richfield, CA, holding pens. Adopted in February
2016.
Well over 15 hands, great conformation. A Spanish-looking horse, lovely
floaty gaits. However, I’m finding myself looking for a new home since I don’t
think I could ever become a domesticated horse. A sanctuary would be
perfect for me since I probably will always be a wild boy at heart.

Please contact us at info@reachouttohorses.com for further details

The Importance of Having a Like-Minded Team

BY: Katie Dixon ~ Renegade Equine

In the fall of 2015, I was connected with a small but mighty rescue group called the Warm Springs Horse Rescue Network, who at the time had helped place over 500 foals in homes. This August, I was fortunate enough to coordinate and host the ROTH Foals Clinic in Sisters, Oregon. I was thrilled to bring the ROTH team of students and people who were interested together in central Oregon, as finding holistic and like-minded horsemanship had been a challenge.

 

The auditors, students, healers, rescue network, foals, and Anna (of course), contributed to a wonderful week of strong team building and brought awareness to holistic horsemanship in central Oregon, as well as connecting like-minded professionals living in the area .

 

Although we may be able to create positive change for our horses and clients on our own, it truly takes a whole-horse approach to be successful in rehabilitation of horses, or even if its not a rehabilitation case, to take them to the next level of physical health and performance.

 

It has taken a little over a year of stepping out of my introvert comfort zone and pushing myself to network with equine professionals to find and build my “dream team” here in Oregon.

 

The results of this year of work building connections and then hosting the clinic are multidimensional. This is the amazing holistic-minded equine team we have here in Oregon :

 

  • A barefoot trimmer who sees the whole horse and how to help them move better
  • Several body workers who can help the horse’s body release restrictions and move more fluidly, and also provide feedback as to how our physical conditioning plan is working from the body’s perspective
  • A few different veterinarians who are open to a holistic perspective or are practicing holistic medicine
  • Several saddle fitters who work to keep the horse and human comfortable to achieve their goals
  • A Nutrition expert to guide us through basic supplementation and feeding practices specific to our area
  • Quality hay providers
  • Local feed companies
  • A team of holistic trainers working together to better horse’s lives around us

 

Without permission from the horse and their human, the team isn’t able to get much done. It its inspiring to me, each day, when we give the horses we work with the ability to communicate and have an opinion about each aspect of their life how much information we are able to obtain.

 

You see, in order for harmony in your horse, you have to create harmony in your team. Some team members may have expertise in multiple areas, and each member of your team needs to be able to respectfully communicate and work together to help you accomplish your goals with your horse.

 

What I appreciate most about building a great team is having a community to discuss new cases with, and also having a group of people I can refer to that can be trusted and will be working for the good of the horse in their area of expertise.

It is our due diligence as equine professionals, to look at the information from our trusted team with open eyes and ears. We need to be willing to shift how we are approaching different aspects of our horse’s unique experience in the world. The balance of a horses psychological and physiological help depend on us being open to look at all areas of our horses lives: what we feed our horses, their living environment, what we ask them to do physically (and emotionally), how we balance their bodies, how we engage their minds, and how we support their growth.

 

When we utilize a multi-faceted approach, examined with a lens of honesty and integrity it is amazing how much we are able to help horses find balance and happiness in their lives.  When we are willing to communicate for the good of the horse with other professionals instead of pointing the finger of blame, we are able to solve the puzzle with that horse and help them to live a comfortable and happy life.

 

Although it takes some effort in networking, a little shedding of ego, a bit of rallying the troops so to speak to get “your team” built, I would encourage you to do so! ROTH as an approach to horsemanship encourages us to look at the whole horse when we are training, and there are some really great equine professionals out there who can help boost your team and ultimately help magnify the great work you are all already doing. We can only benefit from like-minded collaboration, and grow into more skilled and knowledgeable equine guardians.

 

You can’t go wrong having ROTH on your team!

Victory for Wild Horses in Wyoming!

Dear Friends;

On the heels of winning a victory for Oregon wild horse mares, threatened by dangerous sterilization surgery, comes yet another win for the wild ones. The U.S. Court of Appeals Tenth Circuit upheld a lower court’s dismissal of a lawsuit filed by the State of Wyoming against the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) seeking the removal of hundreds of wild horses from public lands across the state including mustangs from the Stewart Creek Herd.  

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Ironically, Quinn and I were visiting the Stewart Creek mustangs with Lynn Hanson, my friend and fellow wild horse advocate, when our attorneys learned of this second victory. Being out here with these beautiful, family and freedom loving icons of the West reminds me of why we fight. Their home is over 230,000 acres of sagebrush valleys and windswept rims along the Continental Divide. (below-Lynn shoots GK filming)

The first time I saw the colorful Stewart Creek wild horses, it was the dead of winter. Ann Evans and I were driving from Riverton to Rawlins, and we were thrilled to see a family band just a short distance from highway 287/789, about 20 miles north of town. 

Winters are bitter and long in Stewart Creek. The foals above didn’t seem to mind. We saw this lone mustang in his huge home during our winter drive-by. He, too, was not far from the main highway. I imagine his friends were just out of sight below him.

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When I left Stewart Creek a few days ago, there was a colorful group of five bachelor stallions only 100 yards or so off the highway. It was grand to see them in nearly the same place as the winter ones.  We encourage you to try your hand at finding them. If you have a high clearance vehicle, you can enter the range on a number of sandy roads.

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Take your binoculars to verify that these often distant dots are real wild mustangs!

Happy Trails!

Ginger Kathrens
For more on Cloud and the world of the Mustangs across the U.S. follow the link:

The Cloud Foundation

 

 

BLM Director Announces No Killing of Wild Horses in Captivity

Points to TCF/AWHPC Lawsuit as reason for Halting Wild Mare Sterilization

WASHINGTON, DC – (September 15, 2016) – Yesterday, BLM head, Neil Kornze announced that the BLM was not accepting the recommendation from their National Advisory Board to destroy wild horses in holding and to offer wild horses that had been passed over for adoption for sale without limitation.  “This recommendation met a firestorm of outrage across the country and caused our phones to ring off the hook,” states Ginger Kathrens, Humane Advocate on the Advisory Board and Volunteer Executive Director of The Cloud Foundation (TCF), the sole dissenting vote to the board’s recommendation.

Prior to the Sept meeting TCF learned that the BLM decided to drop Wild Mare Sterilization Research Experiments in which wild mares (and fillies as young as 8 months) would be surgically sterilized. BLM Director Kornze indirectly referenced the TCF and AWHPC lawsuit requesting to be present to view and record the sterilization procedures, as the reason the experiments in Oregon were cancelled.

Other lawsuits and thousands of emails, letters and phone calls from concerned Americans played a significant part in bringing a halt to the experiments as well as halting the recommendation to destroy captive wild horses.

Kathrens warns, “this does not mean the horses in holding and on the range are out of trouble.”  Kathrens recalls the documents that came to her office in late 2008 revealing  BLM Secret Meetings in which the agency discussed how many horses could be killed each year and how many psychologists would be needed to counsel BLM employees asked to kill healthy wild horses.     In June, Kathrens was asked to speak before the House Sub-Committee on Federal Lands.   “It was clear that the Western congressional representatives had no interest in hearing what I had to say,” she states. “They wanted the horses gone, and Cynthia Lummis of Wyoming purred that euthanasia of thousands of captive wild horses would be such ‘a lovely way to die,’ Kathrens states.

When asked, “where do we go from here?” Kathrens replied, “it is imperative that we continue to speak up, encouraging BLM to use humane tools to limit births in our wild horse herds. The ultimate goal is limiting reproduction to natural mortality. And to reduce the number of wild horses held in short term corrals, we should return these non-reproducing geldings and mares to available BLM lands designated for wild horse use, but where no wild horses currently live.”

This victory is due to thousands of advocates and concerned Americans’ expressing outrage and presenting a united voice for the wild horses.

LINKS:

BLM DirectorAnnounces No Killing of Wild Horses in Holding 

 BLM won’t euthanize wild horses it cannot adopt — Kornze

Lawsuit Filed toUphold Right to Observe Controversial Wild Horse Sterilization Experiments

Republican Led SubCommittee on Federal Lands

Mare SterilizationResearch EA

BLM Secret Meetings2008 

 

Media Contact:

Paula Todd King

The Cloud Foundation

843-592-0720

paula@thecloudfoundation.org

BLM Votes to Euthanize 40,000 Mustangs

BLM ADVISORY BOARD JUST VOTED TO RECOMMEND EUTHANIZATION OF ALL UNADOPTABLE HORSES IN LONG TERM HOLDING. This is in hopes that Washington DC will wake up and give more money to BLM.
GINGER WAS THE ONLY PERSON ON THE BOARD TO VOTE “NO.”
Send your civil, thoughtful comments to the Adv. Board at this email address. Back up Ginger’s thoughtful, civil manner please:
whbadvisoryboard@blm.gov

 

Wild Horse and Burro Advocacy

Ms. June Sewing
Executive Director
National Mustang Association
mustangs@infowest.com

Public Interest 
Ms. Jennifer Sall
jen.sall@gmail.com 

Public Interest
Mr. Fred T. Woehl, Jr.
prtfred@gmail.com

Wild Horse and Burro Research 
Dr. Sue M. McDonnell, Ph. D.
suemcd@vet.upenn.edu

Livestock Management 
Mr. Steven W. Yardley
steven.leslieyardley@yahoo.com

Natural Resources Management 
Dr. Robert E. Cope, DVM
cowdoc75@hotmail.com

Wildlife Management

Mr. Ben Masters
benmasters@unbrandedthefilm.com

Veterinary Medicine 
Dr. Julie Weikel, DVM
jweikeldvm@yahoo.com

 

Kathrens to Present Humane and Economically Sustainable Solutions to BLM’s Beleaguered Wild Horse and Burro Program

 

 WASHINGTON, DC (Tues, June 22, 2016) – Ginger Kathrens, Founder and Volunteer Executive Director of The Cloud Foundation has documented and advocated for wild horse herds for over 22 years.  Known as the Jane Goodall of wild horses, Kathrens’ documentation of Cloud the Wild Stallion represents the only continuing chronicle of a wild animal from birth in our hemisphere.   At the invitation of Representative Raul Grijalva, (D-AZ) she will testify before the House Subcommittee on Federal Lands oversight hearing entitled, “Challenges and Potential Solutions for BLM’s Wild Horse and Burro Program,” Wednesday, June 22, 2016 at 2:30 pm (Eastern Time) in Room 1334 Longworth House Office Building.

On May  11, 2016 the BLM issued a Press Release titled  “WildHorses and Burros on Public Rangelands Now 2.5 greater than when the 1971 law was passed,”  bemoaning problems which they themselves have created.  Instead of embracing realistic management strategies, the BLM and some western politicians have attempted to derail the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act (Wild Horse Act) aimed at protecting wild horses on public lands.

For over 20 years the BLM has had reasonable, cost effective and humane ways to maintain healthy populations of wild horses and burros on their legally designated homes on the range in the form of the fertility vaccine PZP.   Dr. John Turner wrote: “. . . the consequent cost of one un-prevented foal is many times greater than a PZP-22 dose in terms of capture, processing and adoption (estimates > $ 2K) or lifelong warehousing (estimates up to $ 10K). A forty-thousand-dollar cost savings to the taxpayer on each treat/retreat mare is significant.”

Instead, BLM has chosen to ignore solid recommendations by Equine Professionals, The National Academies of Science and thousands if not millions of comments by the public recommending rational strategies and economically sustainable solutions to manage wild horse and burro populations “on the range” rather than continue inhumane and costly helicopter roundups and holding.

Prior to the hearing, Tom McClintock, Committee Chairman, released a memo describing the BLM’s program policy.  Kathrens commented, “BLM alternatives are not humane and do not consider the welfare of a species protected by a unanimously passed act of Congress.”

BLM’s proposed solutions, deadly sterilization experiments on wild mares (some as young as 8 months of age), have met with public outcry not only against the BLM but also Oregon State University for expenditures of taxpayer dollars to finance surgical experiments, which have little practical application unless the death of mares is acceptable.

Kathrens, Humane Advocate on BLM’s National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board, will offer well-thought out solutions and outline problems with the BLM’s current strategies.  “Overpopulation of wild horses and burros on public lands has been alleged by the BLM and passed on without question by media for years,” Kathrens states. “However the BLM manages the population of most herd management areas at levels far below the population required for genetic viability (150-200 animals). In her testimony Kathrens states, “BLM has so marginalized wild horses that the majority of herds are too small to meet even minimal standards to ensure their genetic viability…  It is obvious that one solution to warehousing wild horses and burros in costly short-term holding is a reexamination of appropriate management levels (AMLs) and a fairer allocation of available forage between wild horses and livestock.”

By establishing appropriate management levels at ridiculously low numbers, the BLM declares a huge overpopulation of wild horses and burros.  However, when you look at BLM’s Wild Horse and Burro statistics closely it is easy to see that the problem lies in the herd size BLM wants to manage.  Several examples are shocking.  The Montezuma Peaks herd in Nevada on nearly 78,000 acres is managed at a population of 2-4 horses, therefore the current population of 64 horses is represented as 1600% over AML.  BLM’s manipulation of numbers has been so successful over the years as to dupe the American Public and the media into believing that western public lands are overrun with wild horses and burros.  And their “estimated” population numbers based on 20% annual reproduction has perpetuated a “sky is falling” mentality and rhetoric aimed at destroying thousands of wild horses across the west.

Rangeland Degradation by wild horses has been grossly overstated by the BLM to cover up years of livestock overgrazing. In 1990 the GAO reported: “BLM’S decisions on how many wild horses to remove from federal rangelands have not been based on direct evidence that existing wild populations exceed what the range can support. While wild horses are routinely removed. Livestock grazing frequently remains unchanged or increased after the removal of wild horses, increasing the degradation of public lands.”

A Peer review of BLM Rangeland Health Assessments states, “As of 2012, based on the records PEER received from the BLM… the agency claims that 10,480 allotments have not met standards (55% of total allotment area), and that 16% of allotments (29% of total allotment area) have failed standards due to livestock grazing.

“We have at our disposal humane and economically sustainable ways to manage wild horses on the range,” states Kathrens, “if only the BLM will agree to pursue a different path.”  The Cloud Foundation and many other organizations have offered volunteer assistance to the BLM to make management of wild horses and burros on the range a reality. “It is high time the BLM perform their legal mandate to protect wild horses on public lands.”

The Preamble of the unanimously passed Wild Horse Act concludes, the wild free-roaming horse and burro “are to be considered … as an integral part of the natural system of public lands.”

The opportunity for the head of a wild horse advocate organization to testify before a congressional oversight hearing is historic.  “Constituents concerned for the welfare of publicly owned wild horses and burros are tired of being ignored by the BLM and their congressional representatives,” Kathrens concludes. She continues, “Wishes of the American people are not being taken into consideration.  There are far more cost effective and humane measures for managing wild horses on public lands than those under consideration by the BLM.”

###

LINKS:

Written Testimony, Ginger Kathrens

Wild Horses and Burros on Public Rangelnds Now 2.5 timesGreater than When the 1971 Law Was Passed.

Tom McClintock Hearing Memo

Live Streaming of Oversight Hearing

Mare Sterilization Research EA

1990 GAO Report “Improvements neededin Federal Wild Horse Program” (see Appendix 1)

Peer Report, “The BLM Grazing Data,” 

The Cloud Foundation

BLM Wild Horse and Burro PopulationStatistics 

1971 Wild Free Roaming Horses andBurros Act 

“Using Science to Improve the Wild Horse and Burro Program,” NAS Report 

Media Contact:

 

Paula Todd King

The Cloud Foundation

843-592-0720

paula@thecloudfoundation.org

 

The Cloud Foundation (TCF) is a Colorado based 501(c)3 non-profit organization dedicated to the protection and preservation of wild horses and burros on our western public lands.

Paula Todd King

paula@thecloudfoundation.org

Communications Director

The Cloud Foundation

843-592-0720