Horse Whispering 101 Returns to Reach Out Ranch in 2020

They came to gain an understanding of horse whispering. They left with:

* comfort around horses

* life lessons beyond their dreams

* reading horses and behavior

* watching and learning the intricacies of the herd’s dynamics

* handling, leading and spook busting a variety of horses

* mindful grooming

* practical horsemanship

* groundwork

* self-development

* horse handling for the veterinarian and chiropractor

* equine nutrition and Dynamite supplements

* reaching their goals & overcoming fears

* insights into medizations

* grounding and breathing exercises

* energy exchange

* liberty and life lessons

*  and they left here wanting more…

Watch below to see our students and their experience with ROTH’s Horse Whispering 101

 

 

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Early registration for HW 101 is available by emailing Lacey@reachouttohorses.com

The Language of the Horse Demo at the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo

Anna utilizes the round pen to demonstrate what it looks like to hold a conversation with two different horses in their own language, the Language of Equus. Listen closely and discover just how much can be learned about a horse in a short period of time and what kind of a conversation we can have when we are tuned in, aware, and focusing the mind on the silent and often invisible conversation at hand.

For more videos from Total Integration Tv, go to Ti-Tv.tv or, visit Dr. Vickie Wickhorst’s page at ColoradoSageLearningCenter.com for more on Quantum Healing and Health!

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Reaching Out to Horses in the Round Pen

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Once more, our lovely friends at The Horse’s Hoof have featured Anna in their online publication.  We are so pleased to be partnering with them to reach more and more people who are interested in Natural, Holistic Horsemanship!

Reach Out to Horses by Anna Twinney

Horses have walked this Earth for more than 54 million years.  While some do not consider them among the brightest of the animal kingdom, most are unaware that through their lengthy tenure on this planet they have created an effective non-verbal language that some have coined “the language of Equus.”  This is a language that goes well beyond the unspoken.  Through careful observation, humans have been able to interpret and adopt this method of communication.

Originating from the horses’ body language, behavior, interaction and herd hierarchy, humans can now speak with them through our own body language, gestures and even our intentions.  This language, like any, requires patience and practice.  It can be taught to anyone but fluency only comes from time spent observing and communicating with the native speakers.

Not only can horses read the body language of every member of their species they can read humans just as easily.  They can, almost immediately, see your agenda and how you are feeling.  They will highlight your strengths and weaknesses.  In effect, they know who you are and what that means to them in a very short period of time.  You can lie to yourself but you can’t lie to a horse.  Therefore, it’s important that you begin every interaction with a clear mind, leaving “all your baggage” at the gate.

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One place to start the conversation with your horse is the round pen.  Using the round pen as your classroom can be very helpful in creating a trust-based relationship.  This type of conversation is the foundation to all interaction, every ground session, ridden work and ultimately your success.  A 50-foot round pen is suggested as it allows free motion for horses of most sizes.  It’s also important to make sure you have appropriate footing, which is essential to maintaining health and fitness.

This is an example of a typical session in the round pen.  It’s important to note that this is an overview and is not intended to be a formula or a “quick fix” to solve behavioral issues and requires dedication and commitment to learn and apply.  Remember that communication takes place whenever you are together.  Each gesture and motion you make says something to your 4-legged partner.

Familiarization:  Horses need the chance to explore the round pen at liberty.  They naturally check out their perimeters, take time to settle and to explore the vicinity through their senses.  Each horse is an individual and as such will react in different ways to different circumstances.  This 15-20 minute period is an ideal time to observe their character and learn to read thier personality.

Orientation:  This is the official introduction and there are many important steps in this portion which include:

  • The introduction to the four directions (N, E, S, W) of the round pen
  • Introduction of body language
  • The opportunity for handler to read horse and horse to read handler
  • The time for the adrenaline of horse and handler to subside
  • Creation of a comfort zone in the center of the round pen
  • Creation of a safe distance between horse and handler
  • Manipulation of speed and direction by the handler to gain leadership

Communication:  In a natural herd environment, hierarchy is determined through many factors, one being the manipulation of speed and direction.  As mentioned in the orientation process, the handler adopts this practice in the round pen environment.  The connection between horse and handler takes place before or during the orientation, with a herd of 2 being formed.  Once the herd has been formed and the orientation has been completed, the handler asks the horse to leave by driving them away using body language.  This is the time to make character assessments, to complete a health check, and to begin forming the partnership with the horse.

A higher-ranking horse will use his body language to communicate or punish another by sending them out of the herd.  This gives a strong message as banishment is a grave risk to their survival.  Through the position that the handler takes of driving the horse forward, he will retreat.  This is a form of advance and retreat, also known as pressure release, and has been used by horsemen for centuries.  The handler then adopts equine body language by squaring his shoulders, placing his eyes on the horse’s eyes, and advancing forward in an assertive manner.  The combination of proximity, speed, movements, and eye contact can mean a number of different things.

As prey animals, horses naturally run for ¼ to 3/8ths of a mile before they stop to assess what made them flee.  This distance is roughly translated to 7-8 revolutions in the round pen.  The fleeing that is induced should not be through fear, but rather a request for forward motion.  The handler takes possession of any area the horse stands in at any given moment, hence gaining leadership.  A speed slightly beyond their natural gait is best and will often be in the form of a canter.

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When it feels like the right time to change direction, the horse is asked to change direction towards the round pen wall through the handler’s body positioning.  The same process of asking the horse to leave is repeated in this direction.  Unlike humans, horses only transfer about 20-50% of all information from the left to the right side of the brain and, as such, they consider this to be new ground that they are exploring.

Once the horse has explored both directions he is then asked to return to familiar ground, pressure is reduced but an active involvement is maintained.  An assertive walk forward is continued, while allowing the horse to reduce his speed and maintain focus and attention.  The handler’s body language becomes a little softer as his intention changes.  This procedure is also helpful because the horse will often reveal his history during this time.

The horse will begin to communicate his desire to return to the herd of two.  He will relay very clears signs, such as reducing the size of his circle, relaxing his jaw and neck, and many other gestures that require some study for the handler to recognize.  These are all desired responses that need acknowledgement through a release of pressure resembling a drop of the eyes, a relaxing of shoulders, slowing of the walk, or a hesitating in the line throwing.  This is what makes it a conversation, rather than a demand or simply talking at the horse.  Each try by the horse should be acknowledged in this manner.   Overall, the handler is looking for a complete feeling of unity and a commitment from the horse prior to inviting them back to the herd.  This will come with experience and the whole of the “Reach Out” process generally should take no longer than 15-20 minutes.

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Reach Out to Horses:  A suitable moment is identified to invite the horse to become part of the team again.  The invitation takes the form of a sweeping motion in front of the horse and is similar to the natural gesture of displaying one’s flank, while eating.  The passive nature of the maneuver asks the horse to slow down and step closer.  He will choose to stay close to the wall, come part of the way or all the way to the handler.   If the communication is done correctly but the horse does not return to the handler this may possibly point to a problem, issue, or habit the horse developed before the session.  Ultimately, the greatest compliment is that the horse comes up to the handler and reaches out towards him with his nose.

Close Connection:  An invitation to the horse is given to come into the heart space where he receives lots of reward and reassurance – creating a close connection.  A rub on the forehead will reinforce his positive behavior.  The ultimate reward for a horse is the release of pressure, which translates to walking away.  Horses naturally move in arcs and angles so, when the time is right, the handler walks away in a clockwise direction to perform a figure 8.  The qualities of a leader are displayed to bring the horse back to the center of the round pen, which becomes a familiar comfort zone.

 

Reaching out to your horse is the foundation of all communication.  It can take on many forms and will allow you to learn to read and communicate with your horse, while building a trust-based relationship.  It is the beginning to all success and will aid in improving existing relationships, embarking on new partnerships, and assessing character and health.  From here, you can lead into starting young horses, problem solving, improving ground manners, teaching to lead & load, eliminate kicking, biting, and rearing, just to name a few.  Creating this trust-based relationship with your horse can be a magical experience and the moment you feel that true partnership is a moment you will never forget.

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The First Hello

Coal was gathered from the Little Book Cliffs in October of 2018, recently brought to the BLM holding facility and onto auction. His first impressions with humans was unkind; losing his herd, home, and identity. He was adopted on Saturday, by a young lady named Jade, making her dreams come true. This was Coal’s first gentling session with Anna, his first hello and first impression. Less is more in the beginning. Quiet confidence while communicating with a gentle purpose are a few of the key elements to your relationship with a Mustang. “If you ever have the opportunity to spend a day with Anna Twinney, please do. When it comes to connecting with Mustangs she’s one of the very best.”

~ George Brauneis

Mustang Demo with Jade and Cole and Anna

Above, Anna instructs Jade with regards to the Mustang’s unique Language.

Watch below the video of Anna saying Hello to Coal for the first time.  Simply click on the video to watch.

Read the story of how Jade met Coal and the lengths she went to to bring him home with her in this article in The Daily Sentinel:

“During a hike with her grandmother in the Little Book Cliffs last March, Jade Walker caught sight of a magnificent wild horse — a blue-gray beauty with black marks and a long black mane.

The girl was thrilled when the horse came toward her a ways over a small hill. She, in turn, followed him back.

“I think we have a connection somewhere,” Jade said Saturday as the Mustang waited nearby in a pen with other wild horses.”

Read the Rest of the Story Here

Equine Wellness Magazine Features Anna’s Guide to Better Communication

Anna is a regular contributor to Equine Wellness Magazine, one of our favorites.  Here, she describes how we can better help our horses succeed in training sessions.

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Experiences from the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo

International Natural Horsewoman and Equine Behaviorist, Anna Twinney experiences the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo through speaking engagements, lectures & demonstrations she shares her unique methodologies. Take your training, and the partnership with your horse, to a whole new level as she introduces you to the subtleties of the horse’s communication system and shows you how to use the Round Pen for one of it’s most powerful uses – understanding and assessing your horse’s history, personality, and character. Anna’s unique method of using not only body language but also energy and inter-species communication will reveal just how communicative your horse really is and how we can use this comprehensive language to create and deepen a true partnership between horse and human. Anna teams-up with Melisa Pearce from Touched by a horse, for this very Unique and Intimate Conversation. Together they explore not only how to communicate with horses but also what horses have to teach us about moving away from fear and towards love.

We’ve all heard the saying, “You can never use food when training your horse.” But what if this well-known axiom, like so many hard and fast rules, was wrong? Join International Horsewoman Anna Twinney as she explains the do’s and don’ts and the why’s and why not’s of using food to solve some of your toughest behavioral problems. She will share the secrets of this effective tool, when it is appropriate, when it isn’t, and the common mistakes people make all the time when using “food as reward”. She will also discuss how you can use food to train your horse to do some pretty amazing things!

International Natural Horsewoman Anna Twinney will demonstrate some of the most important elements in creating a trust-based relationship with your horse and getting the results always wanted but rarely achieved. You will also see what makes the Reach Out to Horses methodologies unique, stress-free and extremely effective. Through the exclusive T.L.C. method (Trust-Based Leadership and Compassionate Communication), Anna and her students will show the importance of intimacy and relaxation exercises and how to use them correctly. If you’ve always wanted to apply your healing practice to your horses but were unsure or hesitant to begin, then join Anna as she shows you how to create a safe, effective and enjoyable healing session for your horse.

ST. PATTY’S POLE DANCE

Pole Gentling

Through years of gentling Mustangs Anna has devised methods to gentle wild horses based on their communication system as well as their personal needs. Anna teaches the advantages of pole gentling with St Patty, a McCullough Peaks Mustang subjected to the BLM round-up.