The First Hello

Coal was gathered from the Little Book Cliffs in October of 2018, recently brought to the BLM holding facility and onto auction. His first impressions with humans was unkind; losing his herd, home, and identity. He was adopted on Saturday, by a young lady named Jade, making her dreams come true. This was Coal’s first gentling session with Anna, his first hello and first impression. Less is more in the beginning. Quiet confidence while communicating with a gentle purpose are a few of the key elements to your relationship with a Mustang. “If you ever have the opportunity to spend a day with Anna Twinney, please do. When it comes to connecting with Mustangs she’s one of the very best.”

~ George Brauneis

Mustang Demo with Jade and Cole and Anna

Above, Anna instructs Jade with regards to the Mustang’s unique Language.

Watch below the video of Anna saying Hello to Coal for the first time.  Simply click on the video to watch.

Read the story of how Jade met Coal and the lengths she went to to bring him home with her in this article in The Daily Sentinel:

“During a hike with her grandmother in the Little Book Cliffs last March, Jade Walker caught sight of a magnificent wild horse — a blue-gray beauty with black marks and a long black mane.

The girl was thrilled when the horse came toward her a ways over a small hill. She, in turn, followed him back.

“I think we have a connection somewhere,” Jade said Saturday as the Mustang waited nearby in a pen with other wild horses.”

Read the Rest of the Story Here

This is NOT a Rehearsal. This is NOT a Show. Let the Mustang Demonstration Begin!

We arrived with just 10 minutes to spare having driven over 5 1/2 hours through fog, rain, snow, sleet, and hail to get to Grand Junction, CO, in time to support the Mustangs at the auction and particularly Friends of Horses & Steadfast Steeds with Tracy Harmon Scott and George Brauneis who work hard to give these amazing horses voices and homes.

Follow along for the live streaming of these wild horse 🐎 demonstrations. Part 1 of 4  and catch up on all of the valuable information in these demos that you might have missed.

Mustang Demo with Rango 3 Rango and Anna

Click on the Link to the Video Below to watch the Live Streaming of this event and more!

Watch all of Anna’s Live Streaming over the Weekend with the Mustangs Here

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This is not a rehearsal, this is not a show. It’s live from CO! We have never met before and the demonstration begins!

Many mustangs adapt to life away from the range and some find a way to cope. Imagine knowing just how to reignite their spark and to encourage them to wake up – to find a new identity. That’s where I come in. Bringing 20 years of wild horse gentling to them as I recognize the position they find themselves in and offer a chance of expression and understanding.

Shout out to Lani Salisbury and Jill Haase for joining the ROTH team this afternoon. What true troopers they are. Dedication personified.

Ongoing appreciation for George Brauneis and Tracy Harmon Scott for inviting me to join them at this event in support of the Mustangs.

In Gratitude – $1500 Raised for America’s Mustangs!

A BIG and heartfelt THANK YOU to those who joined us on the Western Slope for the weekend of Mustang Horsemanship in cooperation with Steadfast Steeds and also to support Friends of the Mustangs.  We raised $1,500 in support of the Mustangs at Steadfast Steeds.  Thank you to ALL who showed up, who suited up, and especially those who adopted and want to know more.  We salute you!

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Sunday at Steadfast Steeds was pretty amazing. The weather was crisp, and we bundled up. The love story of Jade and Cole continued, as Anna did a demo with them together.  Anna demonstrated wild horse gentling and guided participants so they could try out some of her methodologies. It’s such a cool experience to see Anna in action, we absolutely love when she comes to town and shares her gifts with others! Thank you, Anna, for being here again this year! (from our newsletter) We had twelve participants at the clinic.

~Tracy Scott

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“My favorite moment from today’s Mustang Gentling Clinic with Anna Twinney!! Coal (who was adopted by Jade yesterday) and Jade are making their first connection as Anna coaches them both.”

~George Brauneis

Die, Pony, Die

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Images courtesy of the Nokota Horse Conservancy

Your action is requested!  Please see the end of the article for details.

DIE, PONY, DIE –

TRNP (Theodore Roosevelt National Park) Wild Horse Management Plan

For the last 40 years, Leo and Frank Kuntz have been involved in helping to preserve a historically genetic and threatened type of horse, the Nokota®, the horse of the Northern Plains natives. There are less than a thousand of this type of horse alive today.

This horse was a gift to the Plains natives from their creator. The horse pulled their travois, the buffalo horse was for hunting, and the most prized was the war horse, the fastest and strongest.

During the mid-1800s, policy was to destroy everything when the military took a village. Homes, clothing and food were burned and many of their horses were shot or their throats slit.

Even after the natives were put on reservations, the cavalry was sent in to round-up the native type horse under the premise they were carrying disease and either shoot them or sent them to auction.

This type of horse was in the TRNP when it was fenced in the early 1950s. Park policy then became total elimination of the horses in the Park. Box canyon type round-ups were attempted, with little success; hay was poisoned and fed; local ranchers were hired to rope some and others were shot.

Fortunately, some local residents and others asked ND congressional delegates in DC to help. The TRNP decided to keep the horses as a historical demonstration herd.

This all changed in the late 1970s and early 1980s. TRNP superintendent Harvey Wickware made the decision to change the geno- and phenotype of the wild horse herd. They introduced domestic studs (quarter horse, shire-cross, and an Arabian) who could not compete with the wild native studs to keep and maintain a mare band. So policy became the removal of the Native wild studs, allowing the introduced domestic studs to make an impact on the herd. They did this by using helicopters and outriders to roundup the wild horses. Their first attempt in the early 1980s was a total disaster. They lost a number of horses running long distances in the heat.

During subsequent roundups, the TRNP targeted the native type studs and lead mares. At the 1986 roundup, Leo and Frank Kuntz purchased 52 head at the TRNP wild horse auction. There they also met Castle McLaughlin, who at the time was working as an intern with the TRNP, and who in 1987 was given a grant to research the history of the wild horses in TRNP, which was funded in part by a grant from the Theodore Roosevelt Nature and History Association. Dr. Castle McLaughlin is currently associate curator of North American ethnography at Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology.

Her chronicled research showed that the wild horses in TRNP were descended from the Northern Plains natives and the turn of the century ranch horses, with strong historical connections to Sitting Bull and his sub chiefs, the Marquis deMores (founder of the town of Medora, ND), Theodore Roosevelt (rancher in western ND and US President), and AC Huidekoper (who ran the largest horse ranch in the world at one time near Amidon, ND). In the 1991 TRNP roundup, The Kuntz brothers were successful at getting the national park to start blood testing their horses and to take out the introduced domestic studs, but what the TRNP didn’t tell people was that most of the shire cross’ offspring were left in the Park. It was suggested that inbreeding could become a problem with the response being that they knew what they were doing.

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Blood work was done only on horses that were being sold. The TRNP sold 62 head of horses and the brothers bought 11 that were the old native type.

The blood was sent to Dr. Gus Cothran at the University of Kentucky. There were 10 horses he called TRNP old-line, adding that they were “extremely divergent” from any other domestic breed.

In 2009, the TRNP started using an experimental contraceptive drug called GonaCon, requiring a yearly injection to prevent pregnancy. They began to study the herd to see what effects the drug was having regarding social structure. The study’s credibility is questionable.

The TRNPs last 40 years of ‘management’ (or mismanagement as it were) has resulted in a horse herd with less genetic diversity and the changing of a historically correct geno- and phenotype horse, as well as culling the younger horses which will result in an older herd dying off of old age, especially with the continued use of the experimental drug GonaCon.

In a report called Genetic diversity and origin of the feral horses in Theodore Roosevelt National Park, published on Aug 1, 2018, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0200795, it states, “It is recommended that new genetic stock be introduced and that adaptive management principles are employed to ensure that unique mitochondrial lineages are preserved and genetic diversity is increased and maintained over time”.

This is a national park. They should NOT be breeding into extinction a genetically, historically correct horse.  There is a need for an interpretive center on the horses, and the slow reintroduction of the Nokota® horses back into the TRNP.

Now is the time for the TRNP to do their job … and their job is to do what is right!  The TRNP should reintroduce the type of horse that was there before and when the park was fenced, which is the Nokota® horse.

It is time to acknowledge the Northern Plains people’s history, horses, and horse culture. The Native peoples’ unique history and culture is a very important part of this Nation’s history.

The Nokota® horses need your help. Please contact Blake McCann, TRNP Wildlife Biologist at blake@nps.gov and Superintendent Wendy Ross at (701) 623-4466 and ask them to do what is right for the horses.

Frank Kuntz

Executive Director & Co-founder, Nokota Horse Conservancy®

If you would like more information about this topic, please call Frank Kuntz at 701-321-2320.

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This Spring, Anna heads across the big blue ocean for adventures in Horsemanship and Animal Communication in Europe!

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3 Days of Connection and Communication

Friday 26th April: Animals as our Spirit Guides with Life and Love Lessons
*Life lessons through animal communication:
*Life lessons from the wild ones
*Life lessons from the horses (long distance communication)
*Life lessons from your own animals (long distance communication)

Sat 27th April:
What your horses want you to know; Animal Communication & Natural Horsemanship in aid of behavioral changes

*Group Session – What your horse wants you to know; a voice from the horses & Natural Horsemanship
*Group Session – What the Horse wants us to know/Problem solving
*NH demonstration
*Group session – straight from the horses mouth/NH demonstration
*A selection of problems brought to the day for resolution through AC & NH application/in action

Sat 28th April: ROTH Life Path Coaching – Liberty, Language and Life Lessons.

*The secret and silent language of the horse in action for life coaching

For more information and to register contact: Amanda
07815318866
amanda@inharmonywithhorses.co.uk

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What’s in a Holistic Horse Day, you ask?

Experience the Next Generation of Horsemanship & Horse Care!
Through demonstrations, lectures, and hands-on exercises, Anna will introduce you to the very same techniques that Anna has used to build genuine, trust-based partnerships with thousands of horses.

How are these methodologies different? Why do we call them the next generation of horsemanship? Simple:
The ROTH Methodology is not a training program. The foundation of ROTH, as designed by Equine Behaviorist, Anna Twinney, is communication; the true language of all horses. By giving your horse a real voice, understanding them and being with them as individuals, you will uncover, not a horse, but an individual and a partner.

Here’s what you will explore in this full-day event:
Part I – “De-Mystify the Round Pen”: Round pen work isn’t “chasing a horse around a pen!” When used correctly, the round pen can be extremely effective in communicating with, training, and learning about your horse. You will experience a language that goes beyond bodily gestures, and create a lexicon that can be used in and out of the Round Pen.
Create the ultimate foundation with your horse
Learn the importance of herd dynamics & behavior
Develop a 2-way communication system
Understand how horses perceive your actions
Discover what is actually happening in the Round Pen
Determine when the Round Pen is NOT the right tool

Part II – “Muscle Testing”: Explore this easy to learn and use tool to identify what your horse needs to be happy, healthy, and whole.
Explore the body, mind, spirit connection
Get direct feedback from your body – the body does not lie!
Test your horse for any supplement, feed, or possible deficiency
Learn how to address energy blocks
Discover how your thoughts, limitations & beliefs affect your life

Part III – “Animal Communication”: Are you ready to take your communication beyond body language and training cues? Then it is time to discover the world of Inter-species Communication and explore a whole new relationship with your horse.
Experience your ability to connect with another being
Learn the reasons behind behavioral issues & how to solve them
Hear an evidence-and-validation-based perspective
Understand your animal’s perspective on situations
Discover what you are actually telling (or not telling) your horse
…and so much more!
The Holistic Horse Day will change the way you see your horse, your horsemanship, and the world!

Take Your Partnership with Your Horse to a Whole New Level!
You can stay for JUST the Holistic Horse Day, or, you can count it as the first day of your Five Day Equine Experience and finish out the rest of the week educated and informed!

Location: Kassel Niestetal, Gut Ellenbach, Germany
gutellenbach.de
For more information on Anna’s Events in Germany, or to register, contact: Will Grebe at
wilfried.grebe@kersting-online.de

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Language, Liberty, and Life Lessons

Day 1: Holistic Horse Day: See above for details on the full Holistic Horse Day
Day 2: Intuitive Enhancement: What is intuition and how can we use it in regards to connecting to and working with our horses.
Day 3: Language and Liberty: How can we “talk” with our horses applying what we learned with Intuition AND Body language?
Day 4: Animal Communication: Experience the phenomenon inherent to us all that allows us to really understand our animals.
Day 5: What our horses want us to know: After the last 4 days you might wonder how there could be anything else your horse would want you to know, oh but there IS! Come find out on Day 5!

Location: Kassel Niestetal, Gut Ellenbach, Germany
gutellenbach.de
For more information on Anna’s Events in Germany, or to register, contact: Will Grebe at
wilfried.grebe@kersting-online.de

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Explore your innate ability to connect and communicate with all of life, telepathically. Join Anna for the two-day introduction or stay on for the FULL 6 days of Animal Communication. The animals are talking. Are YOU listening?

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For more Information on Anna’s Clinics in Denmark, or to Register,

Contact Regina Flittner
reginahf@godmail.dk

Is Animal Communication your Flight of Fancy?

During Anna’s European events, she will delve into the worlds of live and long-distance Animal Communication to show you that communication isn’t only verbal or in person; it can, in fact, be energetic – crossing all boundaries of time and distance. Not only that, she will show YOU how to connect and to begin to get the information to which you wish you had access.  Don’t think you can connect?  Worried you will never be able to hear them?  Anna has taught thousands of people across the globe to learn to tune-in to their natural, inherent connection with all life.

A Rave Review for Escaping Tradition

ROTH Certified Trainer and student Instructor, Katie Dixon of Renegade Equine in Bend, OR, received the following review from one of her local clients with regards to Escaping Tradition.  Please enjoy as the trust-based methods continue their reach far and wide.

Katie

I am the mother of a 12 year old girl who has fallen in love with horses. Our whole family loves all animals and are very sensitive to their individual personalities. Bits, Spurs, whips and other methods of training horses was just not working for my daughter (or me) mentally or emotionally. Luckily, I found the book Escaping Tradition and knew this was the training philosophy that would work for my daughter (and me!).

The goal of establishing a relationship out of respect and love works as a training method. Fear based anything for anyone is not a “true” relationship or training tool that should be used. These animals have a language and they have opinions and curiosity about us and the environment we put them in. How can we expect them to be successful and learn if we don’t listen to them? Why should they only have to listen to us? This book explains just that. The stories shared by individuals in the book, shows us a way of thinking about horses as equal partners and gives them the voice they need.

The personal experiences shared in the book are examples of what horses can do for humans on a much deeper level than performance. This book points out the “real” fact that all horses are different and we need to understand them and listen to them so we can have a rewarding successful experiences together. Trust is the foundation for all successful relationships. Why would it not be the same for horses. Would you trust someone who inflicted pain, or asks you to do things you do not enjoy, or worse never listens to you? Most humans would not trust or continue to work with someone who treated them that way. So, if we are to raise the next generation of horse trainers, owners, and advocates, then they must agree with this philosophy of training.

I can only hope the book gets into as many hands as possible. Vets, trainers, breeders and the young equestrians to be. The young people have not had years of training to unlearn, they are also much more open and sensitive to animals if allowed to be.

Thank you for writing it and I’m happy to promote it.

Kristine Klees

Equine Wellness Magazine Features Anna’s Guide to Better Communication

Anna is a regular contributor to Equine Wellness Magazine, one of our favorites.  Here, she describes how we can better help our horses succeed in training sessions.

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