My ROTH Trainer’s Path–“When the Student Is Ready, the Teacher Appears”

I can’t say that I remember signing up for Anna’s newsletters… but I was receiving them.  I remember opening one and feeling like the timing was perfect. The content spoke to me and offered something I could participate in from home, a webinar series on Holistic Horsemanship. This felt serendipitous, having recently become more involved with horses again. My mom and I loved the webinars, but I soon realized that I wanted and needed more in person — hands on experience with these methodologies. So, I went to Colorado to take the 2.5-day intro clinic and I loved it.

I grew up riding horses back east. My grandmother enrolled me in riding lessons every summer as a young girl. Gymkana, jumping, vaulting, trail rides and more. I loved the horses and my teacher.

Upon graduating from college with a BA in Documentary Studies and Photography, I moved to upstate New York and cared for my grandmother for 7 years.  After she passed, I moved back to Placitas, New Mexico. There I was immersed in and introduced to a whole new world of wild horses. They were literally in my back yard. I photographed the mustangs, also known here as “wild” or “free-roaming” horses, every time our paths crossed.  It felt powerful and special to connect with them as my dog and I enjoyed our walks on the BLM land behind my home. I learned more about the bizarre and intense issues spawned by these community horses.

Two mares were hit and killed in the Placitas village after seeking water during an intense drought, and this prompted me to become involved. I began documenting the wild ones as well as the horses that had recently been rounded up. No longer “free-roaming,” they were transitioning to a life of domestication — confined, engaging in day-to-day interaction with humans, getting microchipped by the livestock board, trailered, moved, vetted, etc. I used all of my tools to support their transition, particularly an energy healing modality called Crystalline Consciousness Technique™.

The grey stallion that was rounded up with his remaining mares was the first to get gelded. He was still very wild, not touched or haltered. The approach was to squeeze him in a secure area to heavily sedate him — enough to have him gelded, vaccinated, and his hoofs trimmed. Long story short, he was given too many drugs and had a hard time recovering from the sedation.  Everything went wrong, and in the end he had to be shot. This was quite a traumatizing experience, and very heartbreaking. It impacted me hugely, and I vowed that I would do everything in my power to prevent something like that from happening again. It was clear to me that the mustangs would have to be handled, haltered, and gentled to some extent prior to getting gelded in order to ensure that the procedure be safe, with minimal trauma and not life threatening.

Anna and ROTH were exactly what I needed. The Universe lined it all up. I have embraced the ROTH program and the education, experience and support its offered me as I learn and grow in my journey adopting, raising, and gentling Placitas Mustangs.

Anna likes to say I did her course backwards. I started with the Untouched Horse Clinic before the Foundation Course because that was my primary focus. I’m grateful that I did, but I also realized that I was lacking skills and training that the foundation course covered. I attended the 3-day Liberty clinic which blew my mind as it introduced me to a whole new world with horses. I continued with ROTH, taking the Foundation courses (1 and 3) and graduating in Fall, 2015.

I was granted the opportunity to take the Untouched Horse clinic one more time after doing part of the foundation and filling in the holes in my training. I enrolled in the Foal Gentling Clinic, and against my better judgement adopted my allocated foal because all the signs I received indicated that it was meant to be. I completed the Colt Starting Clinic, rumored to be the hardest. Indeed, it surprised me with a few firsts. I was kicked on day 1, and by the end of the week rode my first “baby”, a horse named Hopi. I then signed the contract and committed to the trainer’s program. Last month, I completed the NEW Simple Solutions Clinic and it exceeded my expectations. I loved everything about it. As I write this I am working on compiling my 20 case studies, done over the past few years, to submit for the Trainers Exams next month at Zumas Rescue Ranch in Colorado. My highlight is starting my own mustang Friendly, now five years old, under saddle with my ROTH sister Liv from Denmark for our Colt Start case study. What an exciting and fulfilling experience for us all! Friendly was also my first horse gelded (when he was 2) after the passing of the grey stallion. I was nervous, so I took my time and made sure he was haltered and ready and that I had a vet team I could trust.

My mom and I now have two dozen mustangs (after all the babies were born). They are our world, and have been for the past 3 years. We have received funding assistance from Animal Protection New Mexico, and have gelded three of our colts thus far — all free from complications.

Studying with ROTH has empowered me on many levels. Understanding the psychology and nature of the horse, and using it to support them in a trust-based partnership resonates with me on a core level. I trust that I was ready and that the perfect teacher, Anna, was placed in my path to help me and the horses I was adopting and raising. The timing was perfect to support a journey I never would have predicted. I believe completing the trainer’s exams will be a jump start for creating my own business as I move forward using all of my tools — holistic horsemanship, energy healing, essential oils and a deep desire to make a difference in the lives of humans and horses!

Clea Hall

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Fall Has Fallen!

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There is much to do at the home ranch as Fall sets in; paddocks to be maintained, fences to be fixed, arena to be dragged, minerals replenished (see just below). This is especially important during barometric pressure changes. The colts have reached the time to be gelded (more about that in our upcoming newsletter). There is hay to be stocked, chiropractic adjustments (also see below) as well as our natural equine dentist scheduled.  And yet, amongst this busy time and our annual holistic horse course I scheduled something very important – a ride!
 
It was time for me to actually put my dreams into action this year and I am proud to share that we took a gorgeous trip to Granby with X and Honeybrook to see the Fall colors.  This trip was extra special as I invited to of our International students to join me on the adventure, an adventure I had waited 10 years to come to fruition, for me to enjoy with my Mustang and his lady bringing forth very proud moments as they confidently explored new territories. God’s country, as CO is known to many, gifts us with silence and a connection to true nature. 
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CARE & HEALING

In our next diary, we will explore nutritional muscle testing. This practice goes beyond the horse’s diet and supports their full wellbeing, determining body mind and emotional support to enhance wellbeing and eliminate inappropriate behavior. We use muscle testing at home with own horses and supplement as needed. Above, Joseph stands with Honey and Aria as they receive minerals to help with the changing seasons and differences in barometric pressure. Ask us about our mineral protocol.

Chiropractic Work Helps X Thrive

by: Dr. Rachel Heart Bellini 
Today we had a very good session with EXCALIBUR. Like most horses that I work on, he was compressed between the back of the rib cage and the pelvis. His lumbar vertebrae were not aligned completely straight and the muscles of the back were tight and spastic. The iliopsoas muscle and tensor fascia latte (TFL – Think of your IT band )  were both very tight and they were keeping EXCALIBUR’s pelvis flexed. There was a lot of fascial thickening at the attachment of the TFL – you can see the striations coming down from the tuber coxae. This compression of the lower back causes the space between the pelvis and rib cage to shorten and often there is no longer room for the pelvis to rotate down and the horse loses both length and suppleness to his lower back. This makes it hard for them to truly come through from the hind end because they cannot fully engage themselves. These pictures show a few days ago and then after his session today which included spinal alignment combined with soft tissue work. By releasing the soft tissue in the back it makes room for the bones to return to their proper places and restores the communication of the nervous system both to and from this area. The second picture demonstrates the integration achieved when the bones are aligned and the muscles/tendons and ligaments are not braced against the body’s imbalances. You can see that his body has softened and lengthened – he looks poised. 
Colorful Colt Starting
COPING SKILLS: foreign words for almost all equine trainers!  Not even the most seasoned horses can do what these young horses have been supported and trained for PRIOR to being ridden.   We challenge you to watch, listen and learn in support of your young, spooky or discouraged horses.  Bring spookbusting back for all horses, disciplines and situations to help your horses build up their coping skills in time of stress.  In the videos you’ll realize just how much stimulus is involved and the team building on all accounts.

L: Our Colt Starting Group R: The Simple Solutions Tribe

Ponying
Here we taking the ROTH techniques into the saddle and our International trainer students learn the value of teaching young horses to pony alongside a seasoned horse. Integrating body language from the ground to aid our horses to follow their leaders, supports the youngsters to understand their new role. Each horse learns to come off of pressure, follow the guidance of the pony horse and the leadership of the rider as they feel the nuances of the saddle, dummy and ultimately the rider in a safe environment from round-pen, to arena and onto the trail! 
IT’S READY!
And it’s going out to 900 PATH centers, ASAP
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As an Equine Linguist, Behaviorist and Horse Whisperer, Anna will share the secrets to creating an effective program that not only brings powerful insights, healing, and change to your clients but also a healthy, happy environment for your horses.

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True Partnership with Horses as
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CONNECTIONS MATTER
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Subject: Charmed waits behind the “fence”
Each morning this summer I would get up at 6:00 am and go outside to close the gate so that the construction crew could safely come through the farm to work on putting up our new covered arena. Our horses had night turnout on grass for the summer but were closed into a smaller area up at the barn while the construction crew was going in and out through the farm road. Each morning I would tell Charmed he had to be behind the gate when the truck came through at 6:15 am. One morning the crew came through early and I was out in the yard but had not put the horses “behind the gate” yet. Charmed put himself behind the gate, he improvised, by using the railing. He is so cute. He had the most health and behavior issues of any therapy horse I have worked with and even though he has crossed his rainbow bridge he is still an amazing teacher. 
Cathy Languerand -ROTH Certified Instructor
STUDENT SUCCESS!
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The HHC is a life-changing experience. The reason: it’s not just about learning horsemanship, it’s also about getting life lessons! How can I tell you this after only 2 weeks in Colorado and one into the HHC Part 1? Let me unfold it. My journey with horses started when I was a little girl, totally drawn to horses, feeling a connection beyond words. Living in Morocco for most of my childhood, I was totally horrified by the way horses, mules and donkeys were treated and the contact with them through a horse club did not please me at all. Something in me was screaming me it was all wrong. Before stepping onto a communication professional path, I had this dream of learning the “psychology of horses” (as I verbalized it at the time)… 
                                                                     Read Safia’s Story
OOPS, We’re sorry …
Recently we told you that our talented friend and musical contributor to our new DVD, Juni Fisher gave a benefit concert; we listed the wrong location. The concert was held in support of the on going efforts at Happy Dog Ranch. Learn more about our good friends at HDR below! 
For more information on what we do here at ROTH and how you can become  a part of the mission here, please visit our website at:  Reach Out to ROTH

Paving better roads for the next generation of Horse lovers, the ROTH way!

By:Youth Horsemanship, Natural horsemanship for kids Elaine Ackerly, free as a wild Mustang!

As we embark on a journey with horses, we can take many different directions. It can seem as though the horses come to us, serenading to our very essences, with what it is we are missing when we look at life.

 

The dangers of not being in the moment or truly listening to the people in our lives is an epidemic of the largest proportions. We hide behind our keyboards and answer strangers with our emotions fully charged, never fully grasping where the other party is coming from, and only seeing things with the filter of our own minds.

 

When we are truly open to the messages the horses have for us as individuals, we can feel a sense of being turned upside-down or end to end.  We can feel a loss of self to start, but if we consider that the horses have made it through to us, we must not be a lost case.

 

The next generation of horse people are crucial to the survival of our horses and the industry that supports it. There has been a surge of horses as therapists as the world begins to recognize that these animals offer us more than just being the expired tools of transport and farming.  Their connection to and ability to read the people in their lives is fascinating, as their prey animal mentality seems to offer a grounding that is beyond what dogs have brought us.  Almost as if their passive search for food has a wisdom that mankind lacks.

 

This is something that money and insurance costs have taken from some of our pupils.  Children.  Without the horses and lessons I had in my life, I cannot imagine the impatient and angry brat I would have manifested into.  And I can see why there is great caution and concern when mixing horses and children, but the more I see with this combo the more I see how they belong together. The children have fewer filters and barriers preventing them from seeing the language purely.  And doesn’t that make sense when you consider that it is a second language and that, the younger the mind, the easier it is to learn another language?

 

What horses have to offer children in this technologically advanced, disconnected world is something that can save the planet from our self-destructive nature, to reconnect us to the world as a whole and not as the sum of the parts we have come into our lives.  This inter connection brings in a confidence that cannot be paralleled, for it comes about only with a soft humbleness.  The awareness that you are a small tiny speck in a vast sea of organisms, acknowledging that there are other perspectives and knowledge you don’t yet have, and finally, with even all the differences between human and horse, the children begin to see how much they have in common. Their search for comfort, company and fun. The emotions that flare up when you don’t feel heard, the appreciation you feel when you are given a voice…

 

 

 

Side effects of ROTH classes:

 

Picture a being created to roam the highlands, to travel in a family band, each having their place, their role… Yet there she was, locked in a small stall like a chute, forced to carry foal after foal, year after year without once seeing green grass, the mountains, the sun, or feeling the breeze. Let alone enjoying time with the baby! Is she broken inside? Or does she manage to just endure what’s happening to her? What about the little ones, conceived for no other purpose than to keep the mare pregnant? What does the foal suffer with such a burdened start in life? Most them end up in slaughter,  but a few lucky ones get rescued by people who understand the tragedy and are willing to interfere. Equine Voices in Arizona is one of those sanctuaries that now harbors a good number of gentle giants that escaped the PREMARIN (PMU) industry in Canada.

One of that herd was a beautiful gray gelding. He was rescued by Karen Pomroy of Equine Voices as a six month old in a larger group together with his mother. For the next nine years he spent a quiet life in a pen with a handful of older PMU females. Although he was the most impressive by size, his gentle nature was no match for the mare’s distinct determination, probably fostered by years of not having a voice at all.

Reach out to Horses (ROTH) chose this rescue for the Holistic Horsemanship Certification course. The gentle gelding named Kodiak Raja was on the list of horses that got a student assigned for some daily attention. His history included a vague story of some early training attempts gone horribly wrong with him escaping through a fence in panic and a human getting hurt. He had not experienced much training after that. The approach was thus very cautious especially because the horses were in a large pen together during the sessions.

Kodi showed little interest in being the object of a human’s attention but he was very polite and stood as much as he could until he walked away apologetically. Ropes were not his friends. An introduction to the horseman’s rope exploring the whole body was pretty much the culmination of the first week of class.

A rumor started murmuring that he would be a great candidate for a new home. It is likely redundant to point out to the readership of this newsletter that Anna Twinney (the founder of ROTH and instructor of the class) has a special gift in matching horses to students. Kodi went home in the heart of the assigned student and became part of the student’s story. Before the second half of the class started several months later, the family decided to apply for adoption with the owner of the rescue.

During the second part of the class the daily program with Kodi included grooming and work with the emotion code by Dr. Nelson. Kodi was still very reserved but politely allowed to be approached. He was not integrated into actual class work because he was not ready or trained to even be led to the “classroom”.

In the meantime, the paper side of the adoption procedure was completed. The class was over and it was up to the rescue owner and the student to get to the actual transfer. Because of Kodi’s history and his lack of training, there was worry regarding the trailer loading. Would he bolt? Hurt himself or bystanders? After a lot of consideration, one of the rescue’s regular trainers proclaimed that she would be able to load him into a trailer. A date was set and the future owners headed South early on a Tuesday morning for a five-hour ride. It was exciting! At Equine Voices the trailer was backed up to the stall where Kodi was waiting. He did not seem too concerned as he easily glanced over the tall wall at the preparations.

The trainer took over, opened a door to the outside world where fence panels led to the trailer entrance. She went into the stall and softly coaxed Kodi to move towards the opening. Nobody else moved. For about three minutes he explored alternatives: move left, move right, look for another gate… Then he stepped outside. He hesitated for a moment and approached the trailer. Both front feet went up and the trailer floor made a hollow sound. His head was now really high in this position. He bent his neck and looked back over the fence at his mom and the rest of the ladies he had spent all these years with. Then he straightened up and walked calmly inside the dark, shaky box. Helpers quickly closed the trailer doors but there was no need to hurry. He had made up his mind, he knew.

Considering his history and his experience, it is astonishing how sure his demeanor was to leave his herd behind.

A discussion erupted in the truck on the way home regarding the name. Should he get a new name now that he was headed for a new life? The decision was made to call this beautiful tall man Odin Olaf Kodi Raja.

The trip was uneventful. Judging from the quiet behind the truck, he was not particularly agitated in the trailer. At his new home the trailer was backed up to a gate that led into a corral. He walked towards the open doors and then almost fell down because he had forgotten that there was a step up into the trailer and now there was a step down. He immediately headed straight for his new family on the other side of the fence. This is an eclectic mix of rescued drafts, nervous gaited horses, BLM mustangs, and a laid back BLM burro. All together a group of nine, waiting for number ten. He respectfully offered his nose over the fence for greetings. Then he was herded into his new stall next to everybody, including a clan of alpacas. Not all horses are fond of these funny looking creatures but he wanted to say hi to them as well and stuck his head fearlessly and friendly over the fence for some mutual sniffing. A great start!

This does not seem to be the same horse that I had gotten to know at Equine Voices. He always comes up to the fence when anybody shows up. He loves attention and sticks his head into my chest for scratches around the ears. He is also very vocal and whinnies with a heartwarming bluesy voice at his new equine family, as well as at humans. He is majestic yet gentle, very friendly but still polite and not pushy. Training has started slowly with more rope work and halters. He now follows willingly on a lead into the round pen where the first sessions are going very well. He is definitely very smart and the concept of learning is no problem for him. At this point he would rather just hang out with his humans and snuggle rather than having to “work” but I am sure becoming proud of his achievements will make him look forward to lessons as much as we do. I can imagine slowly moseying through the desert on this gorgeous gray that has a magnificent soul that makes his impressively sized body seem like a tiny box.

We have yet to find his trigger points to know exactly what to work on. The plan is to have him enjoy the rest of his long life with this new family, with learning, with essential oils, with games, with good food, with good care, and above all with a purpose! You are all welcome to come and visit to meet him at our ranch. It is worth a trip.

The humble new parents.

 

Photos:

Kodi(left) at Equine Voices: Odin1

Odin (formerly Kodi) first time meeting his new family: Odin2

Odin looking good in the morning: Odin3

Odin and his new friend, BLM burro Zavorine, enjoying a Sunday afternoon at the slow feeder. He is very Buddhist when it comes to standing his ground. Especially my low pecking order horses take great pleasure in chasing him around. Zafi is the only one that just won’t waste energy with pecking order games. So for now it’s the two until he learns to manage the pesky little Paso Finos. We are practicing that whenever I am around to keep an eye on things. Carolina

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“In a world where you can be anything, be kind.”

Maya and sunshine.jpgOn January 1, 2015-New Year’s Day-a family of horses including two young fillies, were rescued from the Sunnyside Lot in Washington State. At that time, I was the Equine Program Director at Zuma’s Rescue Ranch and remember hearing about the “ponies” and the details on several of them coming to Colorado to find their forever homes. Due to many unexpected circumstances, including respiratory sickness, gelding, and homes falling through, they did not make it to Colorado in early 2015 as planned.

In August, 2015 I relocated to Oregon and received a call from Zuma’s Rescue Ranch stating that the father, Zumba, and the filly sisters were now located at a rescue in central Oregon. The founder of this rescue had passed away suddenly and the ponies were in desperate need of training to help them find their forever homes. I reached out to the rescue, who was very grateful for support and help with the ponies, and began organizing acquiring panels with which to build training areas. Given the devastating situation at the rescue, I also collaborated with Zuma’s Rescue Ranch on fundraising for dental work for Zumba and two other adult horses on the property.

I met the sisters shortly before finishing my case studies for the Reach Out To Horses® Trainers program, and was thinking they would be great additions to my untouched horse case studies. My plan was to take the next six days to gentle the girls, pushing myself to work a little more quickly than my typical pace. As I discovered during our assessment session, these were not the horses to work with any sort of timeline or agenda. It became clear very quickly that the girls had experienced a lot of trauma in their short lives.

The younger sister, later named Sunshine, was wearing a halter when I met her, but not on her terms as she was not yet gentled. When we began, she would interact with me for short periods of time before getting upset–resulting in ear pinning, teeth baring, and spinning to kick. She was living alone and had been pacing so frequently that she had dug herself a hole at one end of her paddock.

The older sister was even more fearful. On our first day of training, she trembled when I stepped into the 40ft round pen she was living in. She lowered her head and would not make eye contact. It took the better part of 20 minutes to gently encourage her to leave the round pen and go into the training area. I placed food into her training area to help provide comfort, and just being in the smaller area with me on the outside became our first “lesson”.

Over the next few months we worked on her claustrophobia, fear of gates clanging and other loud noises, extreme fear of any kind of rope, whip or stick being near her, and tolerating human presence in a confined space. We built up trust and our relationship, with her turning to face me and staying soft when I entered her area, reaching out to my hand for a greeting with her nose, as well as her first touch. During our few months in training at the Oregon rescue, we had powerful communication and healing sessions together, including her sharing with me she would now like to be called “Maya”. This little horse, despite her fear of humans, started to trust me enough to allow some Equine CranioSacral and Reiki from a distance, and she began to communicate with me in short, clear messages. One of our more powerful communication sessions came right before her first touch. Here is the excerpt from her training journal on that day:

 “Tears brought to my eyes today as “sister” accepted her first touch by choice. Moments before our first touch I heard loud and clear in my head, “Namaste,” to which I replied, “Namaste.” There is so much fear in the world for this little horse due to force and violence; yet, she has chosen to trust me on this path. “

—-The spirit in me salutes the spirit in you—

It became clear to me as I worked with these girls, that if they were to make a fully recovery they needed to be much closer to me so we could work together on a daily basis. By networking with another local Oregon rescue, Mustangs To The Rescue (MTTR) and Zuma’s Rescue Ranch in Colorado, we were able to transport Zumba to MTTR to complete his rehabilitation and training. Maya and Sunshine were able to relocate to the property that I am working out of in Bend, Oregon as Renegade Equine.

We fundraised jointly for the materials to build a shelter and the property owners donated boarding costs. Through the generosity of people across the country and funding from Zuma’s Rescue Ranch, Maya and Sunshine’s feed, supplements, and medical needs have been fully sponsored for the last six months.

Once Maya and Sunshine settled in together at Renegade Equine (boy, were they excited to see one another after being separated for several months and living alone), the intensive rehabilitation began in earnest. In addition to my daily training, there have been a few amazing volunteer healers and trainers who have supported their recovery and training. During the winter and spring months we implemented the following to aid in healing both physical and emotional aspects of trauma: Bach Flower Essences in their water 3-4 times per day, customized herbal blends, herbal de-wormers and conventional feed through pelleted de-wormers, clicker training, essential oils, omega 3/6 support, probiotics, natural ulcer treatments, daily whole food mashes, Reach Out To Horses® methodology, Reiki, CranioSacral bodywork, Dynamite Specialty  Products, and region specific vitamin and mineral supplementation.

I attempted to integrate the ponies into my longstanding balanced herd to aid in the whole horse healing process, but unfortunately, Maya became very aggressive with the other horses. The girls are living separately for everyone’s safety.

Around the end of February, I began to notice that Maya was packing feed in her mouth and was unable to chew hard foods easily. By now, Sunshine had been fully gentled and was coming along beautifully. However, even with consistent and compassionate training and a thorough “whole horse” healing approach, Maya was not yet haltered–making it difficult to get her necessary medical treatment. I began discussions with a few mentors and colleagues regarding the ethics of utilizing a chute to help move Maya along so we could get the dental treatment she needed. We decided that if we could build a safe chute, and also train her to be comfortable in it using the methods we were already implementing, that this would be a viable option to help Maya.

Now, I want to say that using a chute is not something I was comfortable with for many reasons, but over time, I was able to talk through my concerns, and create a training plan to keep Maya safe, emotionally and physically.

As luck would have it, my parents were visiting around this time. My dad is very handy and helped turn my ideal chute into a reality. He engineered and built the structure, leaving me to finish the padding for added protection. I worked on getting Maya comfortable in it when it was open, then with walls, then with the front closed while continuing to work with her in a small training area. I had not yet completed the material for our chute, but one day when I got to the barn I kept getting mental pictures of Maya in a halter and they just didn’t stop coming. That day she was exceptional in our sessions together, allowing more touch on more areas of her body then ever before. The next day a healer friend who had been working with the girls consistently came for a session. One of the first things out of her mouth was, “I think you are going to get the halter on today!”

Maya and sunshine 2

“Funny you say that… I’ve been getting pictures of the same thing,” I replied. That day we made continued progress in that direction with Maya allowing more work with the rope, movement of the rope, and things near her head than ever before. The following day was magic and in a very short period of time, Maya accepted her first halter.

I had thought I was a patient person, but Maya showed me how much more patient I could become. How much softer I could become. How much more thorough in my horsemanship and holistic care for horses I could become. Maya showed me that my awareness of my intention and body language could be even more fine-tuned, that I could commit myself more than I thought possible, and she helped me bring together a holistic community that I didn’t think was here in Central Oregon. She helped me believe in myself a little bit more, and in return I offered her the same gift… that she could believe in herself a little bit more, and have the courage to trust in the transformation.

I want to thank Zuma’s Rescue Ranch for their continued support of Maya and Sunshine’s care (go to zumasrescueranch.com for more information or to donate to the girls’ ongoing care), Mustangs To the Rescue for their commitment and support of the girls’ sire, Zumba (please visit mustangstotherescue.org) and Reach Out To Horses® (please visit reachouttohorses.com)  for continuing to educate people and advocate for horses.

Please share this story so these beautiful ponies can find their forever homes. For more information on Maya and Sunshine, or Renegade Equine, contact Katie Dixon at renegade.equine@gmail.com or renegadeequine.com.

 

 

The Language of Equus conveyed through Two Horse-Human Conversations

Sophie Peirce

My interpretation of Ruckus’s body language and my interpretation of how Ruckus read my body language.
 

 Each time a human interacts with a horse, the two are having a conversation. Horses, however interpret our actions in their own language, so for an authentic, respectful and two-way conversation to occur it is important for the human to learn the language of Equus.

This paper explores the language of Equus, using two (of many) interactions and hence conversations I had with the six year old rescued Icelandic gelding Ruckus, as a case study. As horses communicate primarily though body language, the conversations have been presented conveying body language (including positioning, posture and movement of shoulders, hips, limbs, ears, eyes and feet), elements of heartbeat, intention and feel – together with my human interpretation of what they might mean. Through observing our body language and reflecting on what it communicated, I have been able learn a little about Ruckus’ personality and learning style, which if I was to continuing working with him, would help me tailor experiences and lessons in ways to set him up for success, by building trust and bringing out the best in him without dominance.

Read the full experience by following the link below:

Sophie – Equine Psychology Project

Training A Geriatric Horse Case Study: Equine Psychology Course Project

Reach Out To Horses
Holistic Horsemanship Comprehensive Program – Part I

Lee Bialozynski
7/27/14

 

Introduction

This paper explores the implementation of a training program designed to address the anxiety a geriatric horse exhibits when confined to an indoor space. The intention of the project is to detail and explore the following parameters:

1. Changes to a learned response (fear of confined indoor spaces). This is what the horse is to (un)learn.
2. Changes to the training program itself as it unfolds in real time and insights gained into the learning pattern of an older horse. This is what the human learns.

The subject of the training plan is a 35 year-old mare named Fancy. Fancy lives at the Zuma Rescue Ranch in Littleton, Colorado, with her paddock-mate Cookie.

This case study presents the daily activities of Fancy’s training plan. The definition/intent of the labels used in the following training log are as follows:

Plan – Presents the training session as developed by self, approved by Jodi Messenich, and reviewed by Anna Twinney.

Actual – Identifies the events of the day as they actually occurred.

Factors – Extraneous information, events, or other considerations occurring that given day that explain the difference between the Plan and the Actual training.

Observations – Any reflections or descriptions from the day. Also will present any learned behavior – for both human and horse.

Read the full Case Study by clicking the link below:

Training A Geriatric Horse Case Study