A Blending of Two Worlds to Create Symbiosis on Behalf of the Horses

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The Blending of Two Worlds

Thank you to Anna Twinney for orchestrating the assembly of a panel of holistic and veterinary experts at Ray of Light Farm.  Present for the discussion on the evening of July 12thwere Dr. Scott Sears from Connecticut Equine Clinic, Scott Lesinski, Cathy Languerand, and, of course, Anna (three Dynamite Distributors). The audience was made up of a variety of knowledge seekers ranging from people who have used Dynamite products to the very young group of volunteers who help us take care of the 150 (or so) animals who reside at our rescue/therapy center.

Ray of Light Farm is a Dynamite Barn and a Dynamite distributor, and we also rely heavily on the advice of our veterinary team to keep our animals in good health. As the caretaker of so many animals, I often find it confusing trying to blend the two worlds. It was enlightening to hear the many experiences the distributors had in the field with equines, but also important to this meeting was adding the knowledge of the physiological effects, an explanation of how some of the products work in the body and why they are necessary.  In a discussion with Dr. Sears after the meeting, he affirmed the statement that horses do not normally need grain, it’s more of a tradition than a need. But they do need a strong foundational program such as the one designed by Dynamite: Dynapro, Vitamins, and free choice minerals.

From my perspective, there are three things that I took away from this evening.

  • The comfort level that our veterinarian is a team player that I can openly discuss our nutritional and first aid plans with.
  • The absolute law that, as a responsible horse person, the job of diagnosis belongs to the medical professionals.
  • The necessity of a partnership between Veterinary professionals and Dynamite distributors.

I cannot think of a larger way to benefit our clients and the animals that we all love.

With gratitude to all who participated,

Bonnie Buongiorne

Founder, Ray of Light Farm

Dynamite Distributor

dynamite

Do you share a passion for Holistic Health?  Visit Anna’s Dynamite Page and read on about the multiple benefits of doing life the Dynamite way!

What is a Dynamite life like?

 

The 2017 ROTH Calendar is Here!

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 The Places You Can Go with ROTH 
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Animal Communication, Energy Healing and Horses,
Costa Rica
For More information Contact: Nancy
kindredconnectionscr@gmail.com
011-506-8703-1561
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Healing Horses at the Historic Bitterroot Ranch
A Unique Reach Out to Horses® Program! Become a certified Reiki Practitioner Level I & II: 4th – 11 , Reiki Master: 3rd-11th while attending a tailor-made Reach Out to Horses® clinic.
Bitterroot Ranch, Dubois,
Wyoming
Accommodations:
Hadley Long-Fox
bitterrootranch@wyoming.com
(800) 545-0
019
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Animal Communication
Dream Retreat
White Stallion Ranch, Tucson, 
Arizona
Contact: Reach Out to Horses
info@reachouttohorses.com 
For Accommodation
Contact: Carol Moore
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January 24 & 26                                                 

Animal Communication Mentorship Program
Online or In Person
Tier One: Home Study
Tier Two: Starts January 24th
Tier Three: Starts March 18th
(Comprehensive Mentorship Program Including All Previous Webinars)
February 24-26th                                                  

Watsonville, California | Pregnant Mare Rescue
February 24th: Introduction to Animal Communication
February 25-26: Animal Communication Weekend: 
Exploring Animal Communication with Rescue Animals and Animals As Our Soulmates. 
March 18th and 19th                                           
Elizabeth, Colorado
Animal Communication Weekend – Live vs Distance Consultation
Rocky Mountain School of Animal Acupressure and Massage
RMSAAM
Contact: Jenny – (303) 660-9390
information@rmsaam.com
March 18th – 23rd                                             

Elizabeth, Colorado | Reach Out Ranch
Animal Communication LIVE Mentorship Program – Week 1
March 20th – 23rd                                             
Elizabeth, Colorado | Reach Out Ranch
Four Day Animal Communication Class
April 20th                                                     

Fall City, WA
An Evening of Animal Communication
The Northwest Natural Horsemanship Center, 
Jim “Hutch” Hutchins
nwnhc@nwnhc.com
425-222-3623
nwnhc.com
June 22nd                                                        
Kalispell, Montana
An Evening of Animal Communication
For Location & Accommodations
information contact Nancy at:
nancyhorne@centurytel.net

or call (406) 756-2327
December 8th-13th                                               

Elizabeth, Colorado | Reach Out Ranch
Animal Communication Live Mentorship Program – Week 2
December 9th-12th                                              
Elizabeth, Colorado | Reach Out Ranch
4-Day Advanced Animal Communication Class
Contact: Vincent Mancarella
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April 21st – 23rd                                                
Fall City, Washington | The Northwest Natural Horsemanship Center
3-Day Intuitive Riding
SOLD OUT! Auditing Spots Available
Jim “Hutch” Hutchins
nwnhc@nwnhc.com

425-222-3623
nwnhc.com
June 17th & 18th                                                
Broomfield, Colorado | TBA
2-days of Horsemanship with Anna
Confident Horse, Confident Rider
Joan Matteo
Contact: Vincent Mancarella at
June 23rd – 25th                                                 
Kalispell, Montana
3-Day Intuitive Riding with Anna Twinney
For Location & Accommodations
information contact Nancy at:
nancyhorne@centurytel.net
or call (406) 756-2327 
June 30th – July 2nd                                             

Vermont ~ TBA
3-Day Intuitive Riding with Anna Twinney
Contact Kristen Mason for more information
reininghopeaeaat.com
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September 10th – 22nd                                         
East Haddam, Connecticut | Ray of Light Farm
ROTH 2-week Holistic Horsemanship CERTIFICATION course – Section 1
Contact: Ray of Light Farm
Email: info@rayoflightfarm.org 
or call (860) 873-1895
September 26th – October 8th                                     
Littleton, Colorado | Zuma’s Rescue Ranch
Contact: Vincent Mancarella at 
info@reachouttohorses.com
Location: Zuma’s Rescue Ranch
info@zumasrescueranch.com
(303) 346-7493
October 24th – 30th                                              
Littleton, Colorado | Zuma’s Rescue Ranch
7 Day ROTH Trainers Exams
Contact: Vincent Mancarella at
Location: Zuma’s Rescue Ranch
info@zumasrescueranch.com
(303) 346-7493
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May 22nd – 27th                                                

 Littleton, Colorado |Happy Dog Ranch
Horse Whispering 101
with ROTH Certified Instructor Elaine Ackerly
Contact: Vincent Mancarella at info@reachouttohorses.com
Location: Happy Dog Ranch
happydogranch.org 
(303) 915-8531
July 24th – 30th                                                
Littleton, Colorado |Zuma’s Rescue Ranch
Colt Starting 101
Contact: Vincent Mancarella at info@reachouttohorses.com
Location: Zuma’s Rescue Ranch
info@reachouttohorses.com
(303) 346-7493
August 5th – 11th                                               
Bend, Oregon |Warm Springs Horse Network
Foal Gentling the ROTH Way
Contact: Katie Dixon renegade.equine@gmail.com
(802) 222-1163
August 14th – 20th                                              

TBA
Reach Out to the Untouched Horse:
A week with the wild ones
August 26th – September 1st                                   
Green Valley, Arizona |Equine Voices Rescue and Sanctuary
Simple Solutions:
A week of Advanced Horsemanship with Anna Twinney
Contact: Vincent Mancarella at info@reachouttohorses.com
Location: 
Equine Voices Rescue & Sanctuary, Tucson, AZ
(520) 398-2814
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March 6th                                                       
Golden, Colorado | Jefferson Co. Fairgrounds | 7:30pm
In Partnership with Horses. 
Horses as Our Coaches, Messengers and Healers
A Presentation at the Jefferson County Horse Council
Contact: Andrea Raschke
www.jeffcohorse.com
March 9th-12th                                                 

Denver, Colorado | National Western Complex
The Rocky Mountain Horse Expo
                                             
April 8th                                                      
Glade Park, Colorado | Steadfast Steeds
Holistic Horse Day
April 15th                                                     
Broomfield, Colorado | TBD
Holistic Horse Day
Joan Matteo
Contact: Vincent Mancarella at info@reachouttohorses.com
April 28th-30th                                                 

Centennial, Colorado | Friends of Horses Rescue
3-Day ROTH Liberty Clinic Event
Contact: Vin Mancarella for course details at info@reachouttohorses.com
Location: Friends of Horses
fohrescue.com
Contact Bill Stiffler
whstiffler@msn.com
June 29th                                                     

Vermont (location TBA)
Holistic Horse Day
Contact Kristen Mason for More Information
reininghopeaeaat.com
                                                 VIEW OUR CALENDAR BY MONTH

Teaching the Horse to Stop With an Unbalanced Rider Starts Before We Even Put a Foot in the Stirrup.

 

If you haven’t had the honor of seeing this method in use, this video should show you the impact it can have on your entire future as a rider.  It’s never fun to come off a horse who leaves us in the dust, or who kicks at us on our way down.  Anna has found a simple and safe solution to these issues, and it starts in the early days of training.  Additionally, this way, the horse gets to work through an unseated rider and cope with “rider falls” when our bodies are not the ones at risk.  So really this is an invaluable step for ANY riding horse and will benefit any rider to climb aboard in the future.  By starting simply, starting slowly, and allowing the horse to assess the “problem of an imbalanced rider,” we can teach them how to help us stay safe.  Please visit our website for more information on how you can engage in one of Anna’s clinics and learn the tools of the whispering trade.  Visit us at: Holistic Horse Course .

 

 

 

Anna Takes Animal Communication to Ray of Light Farm in East Haddam, CT.

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Everyone talks to their dog. Those of us with pets, have had casual “conversations” with our furry, feathered, or even finned friends. It’s human nature to chat. We’ve likely bent Rover’s ear too long over trivial irritations that happened at work or lamenting the tedious commute home. Our pets have long been victims of our mindless self-talk and keepers of our deepest secrets.

But what if you could have a real conversation with your animal companion?  What if you knew what they were really thinking or saying …

World renowned animal communicator and horse whisperer, Anna Twinney would say “the only thing stopping you is your own beliefs of what is truly possible. You absolutely can know.”

On September 9-11, Twinney will lead a group of animal lovers at Ray of Light Farm in East Haddam on a journey to tap into their inherent abilities. Animal Communication is not supernatural, but a natural way of communicating with animals and even people!  Animals communicate telepathically with one another all the time, we just need to reawaken those intuitive senses to explore this extraordinary skill.

Twinney is sought out all over the world by concerned pet and horse owners hoping to find answers to behavioral issues, health problems and other mysteries.

Her own journey into animal communication began over two decades ago.  Having unlocked this missing piece of the puzzle, Twinney knew that she had to share her knowledge. Now known the world over for her exceptional abilities, specific, verifiable methods and extensive knowledge of horses, Twinney often found animal communication techniques helpful during her work with horses as well.

“The language of the horses, called Equus, is almost completely non-verbal. While horses have the ability to vocalize and they do use it … the nuances of their language is in the subtitles only seen by those fluent in the language,” Twinney explains.

The “Evening of Animal Communication” workshop is truly a step through the wardrobe into a world that most people only dream of.

To learn more about Animal Communication, Anna and the event at Ray of Light Farms visit ReachOuttoHorses.com or to learn more about Ray of Light Farms and the rescue efforts there, visit www.RayofLightFarms.org . A portion of the proceeds from Twinney’s workshops will be earmarked to support the ongoing horse rescue and rehabilitation at Ray of Light.

For further information on registering to learn Animal Communication yourself, visit us at the link below:

Reach Out to Horses Events Calendar

Unlock Your Inehrent Abilities to Connect

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For further information and to enroll please visit us at the ROTH website: http://www.reachouttohorses.com/ctclinics.html

 

In Support of Our Friends and ROL!

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A ROTH supporter Sally and her husband Joe wrote a beautiful song about Ray of Light Farm and a horse that touched her heart. Take a listen! 

A note from Sally and Joe:

Hello friends!
     Joe and I wrote an original song called “Hear the Whisper” back in 2011. It was inspired by a wonderful place in Connecticut called the Ray of Light Farm and a horse named Petey who is now a permanent resident there.
     We recorded the song along with our buddy Rob Fetters here in Cincinnati.  Recently, I was invited to enter this song in an original song competition.  I immediately thought “Cool…maybe we could earn some money to help support Ray of Light Farm!” After sharing this idea with Joe, we decided that if we could win the competition, we would donate all proceeds to Ray of Light. 🙂
     So, we entered Hear the Whisper” about two weeks ago.  I am amazed at the response we have received so far!
     The competition works this way: First, songs which gain the most response (likes, follows, comments, tweets and shares) DIRECTLY FROM THE LINK BELOW, get points.  The more points, the better our chances of winning.  There is also a judges panel who gets to choose winners as well.
     “Hear the Whisper” is accompanied by a slide show.  Countless individuals were directly and indirectly responsible for the material in the slide show.  We sincerely thank them for their contributions!
indi.com/ADE76FEF Once at the song link, sit back and enjoy the presentation.  Careful attention was given to synchronize the words with the photographs. The words came to me through Spirit; thus it is essentially a prayer through song.
    Here as well is a link to the Ray of Light Farm  rayoflightfarm.org/
Please take the time to explore their website.  An amazing place that truly offers “healing presence in a wounded world.”
Thank you all for your support, and may 2016 best your best year ever!
Love,
Sally and Joe

 

Snow Day: The Tragic Consequence and Life-Affirming Perseverance of the Nurse Foal

Snow Day:  The Tragic Consequence and Life-Affirming Perseverance of the Nurse Foal

By Anna Twinney

I had never seen a horse graze from its knees. But that was exactly what Snow, a majestic, 2-year old, Appaloosa Colt was doing. I thought to myself, “I couldn’t have made him do that, I barely touched his line.” I had wanted to move a short distance, so I could relax on the bleachers nearby while he ate, but just requesting those few steps made him drop to his knees. Perhaps it was a desperate attempt to stay on the lush patch of grass or, potentially, a learned behavior pattern.

I reassured him he could stay. He got back on his feet and walked with me so I could sit down.   I could have ignored this mannerism and chalked it up to a fun story about a playful and mischievous colt, but the behavior was so unusual I felt the origin was worth exploring.

I also noted that instead of nibbling at the grass and continuously picking little tufts, like most horses, he took chunks of grass. He filled his whole mouth with one bite and would bring his head up high, as he did his best to swallow the mouthful.   At first I thought it might be that he needed to settle into a groove, but it became clear this was his way of eating. He looked rushed and was taking whatever he could get. With each mouthful he would take the grass out by the roots before moving onto another. There was no casual grazing.   Snow’s way of eating resembled a hungry orphan or someone who was never taught how to eat. I had not seen this behavior before either.

Not everyone would have noticed his unique way of eating, but I did and had to wonder where it originated. A herd will mirror one another and casually graze with their heads down for long periods of time. It’s a beautifully tranquil and spiritual occurrence, to watch wild ones blissfully eat in harmony, but this was not the case with Snow. I wondered if he had ever learned to graze and if this was as a direct result of his youth.

It was then I remembered Snow’s past.

At just a few days, or possibly weeks old, Snow had been rescued 2 years prior by a group including Ray of Light Farm and Reach Out to Horses. He was “Orphaned”. Not because his mother had died. Instead, is was determined that he had been forcibly taken from his mother and found himself abandoned, too young and innocent to take care of himself.   New to this world he was most likely left to fend for himself in either a stall or trailer. His only choice was to figure out how to eat and drink… or die. He was the smallest of the foals we had rescued and the smallest I had ever seen in my twenty years of rescuing horses.

I could hardly believe someone could do this to an innocent being.

 

Unfortunately he had been born into the nurse foal industry. A heartless, cruel business in which, reportedly, thousands of foals find themselves as “biproducts”, of no value to the stewards who manage the nurse foal barn. Their mothers are bred purely to function as nurse mares to raise more valuable foals, normally born to top performance horses. Nurse foal barns can usually be found primarily close to racetracks.

Not only had Snow found himself isolated and lost without ever knowing why, but he also came to us very sick. Within days he sought out human connection and valued the comfort of human touch in the gentling process. Innocently and trusting he forgave the very same species that had tossed him aside to die.   I remember thinking, that nobody deserves to be punished or treated this way, let alone a newborn infant.

When his group of foals first arrived milk replacer was arranged for them and placed in special buckets for the foals to drink. Quickly they began suckling on the side of the buckets for comfort, mimicking suckling their mother’s teats. It was heartbreaking to watch. We noticed missing hair from many of their ears and discovered this was due to the foals suckling one another. Innately they knew to find dark and damp places from which to suck, be this around the buckets, each other’s ears, or sheaths.

We kept the foals next to one another during the day’s training and together in the herd at night. We never wanted them to feel isolated or abandoned again. It was like watching a group of kindergarteners with little parental guidance. With hay provided freely they would munch away throughout the day sporadically napping in between meals. While we watched some of them adopting natural grazing habits, Snow must have created his own way.

We offered our very best; a second chance at life, asking, and apparently receiving, his forgiveness. At first touch he would buckle in pain and through veterinary care we discovered that not only was he not able to drop his penis to urinate, but he was suffering from a potentially fatal parasite. This ailment would take months of special ongoing care from the rescue, but this little warrior showed his true nature and eventually pulled through.

The sound of horses returning to their stalls snapped me back to the present. I realized my time with Snow was up. I had assigned the students in my Holistic Horsemanship Foundation Course a fun exercise of discovering the motivating interests of their horses and, in the distance, I noticed horses returning to their stalls.

Giving Snow a couple more minutes to enjoy his banquet, he understood my telepathic message this time, and willingly came along with simply a soft touch. It had been precious time together. After leading him back to his stall, with gratitude I removed Snow’s halter, and said my farewells, looking forward to our many meetings in time to come. I left him with my love, appreciation and admiration.

Later I inquired with the farm as to why they thought Snow had developed this strange behavior of “knee grazing”. Bonnie the manager of the farm knew exactly what I was talking about and remembered how Snow had even drunk his milk in that manner.

She explained that after the rescue, the farm had found 2 surrogate mares willing to accept the foals, which happen to be mini’s. Both mares took the foals on as their own and accepted their suckling. The youngsters had to lower their heads down quite low to reach these mares teats and it was then that Snow learned to make himself smaller. Snow had the chance to graze and learn from the small herd and yet somehow missed the grazing style. They had provided the most natural lifestyle they could with the circumstances they had available to them.

My heart was filled with both sorrow and admiration for this beautiful soul. Snow had endured so much, more pain than any creature should have to experience, especially one so young – all because he was born to the wrong mare. And yet he found his way out the other side.   He could have given up, fallen into deep depression, and chosen to leave the planet. But he didn’t. He took the challenges of a rough start and, with the help of many kind people and horses, turned his circumstances around and found a new life and a new beginning.

Unlike so many nurse foals, his journey had a happy ending. I take solace in that thought as I, with so many others in the world, continue to work diligently to give more horses like Snow a chance at a life of happiness, partnership, and love.