Fancy a Frolic with the Foals?

Final foals 2019

Let us show you how to create a bond that can’t be broken.

Over the course of 7 days, Anna will introduce you to her unique and comprehensive foal gentling methodologies. Through gentle, compassionate, and supportive communication, you will discover how to quickly and effectively introduce foals to the world of humans, training, and even their own language. These techniques are also very effective for untouched and spooky horses, and to help solve the most frustrating behavioral issues with all your horses.

You will learn (and put to use) the same uniquely designed and tested program that Anna, herself, has developed and used to start hundreds of foals!

Gentling foals can be some of the most important and rewarding work you will ever do. In this case, your efforts are even more critical. The foals we work with in this event are untrained and rescued. So in addition to getting world-class, groundbreaking training, you are helping these innocent, rescued souls. You are giving them a loving, heart-filled introduction to the human-horse connection, and gaining a solid foundation that will help them in their lives. You are also helping them to gain a greater possibility of being adopted, and a second-chance at a life they deserve to live.

I Want to Learn More About Foal Gentling

Eye Contact for Clear Communication

It was a few years ago we gentled Sunny (Sol) at the ROTH foal gentling clinic at Ray of Light Farms in Connecticut. She was but a few weeks old and the most shy and smallest of them all – she has grown into herself and put her past behind her (being subject to the PMU industry). Sunny seeks eye contact, she seeks connection and clarity. When it was lost, she learned to tune out. She wants to read her trainer’s eye by tracking her thoughts and create a place of safety. Without it she runs riot in the round pen with it she moved into softness and relaxation! Its these little things that are so big for our horses, without them all goes wrong, with the subtleties it seems so simple when you know how.

 

Side effects of ROTH classes:

 

Picture a being created to roam the highlands, to travel in a family band, each having their place, their role… Yet there she was, locked in a small stall like a chute, forced to carry foal after foal, year after year without once seeing green grass, the mountains, the sun, or feeling the breeze. Let alone enjoying time with the baby! Is she broken inside? Or does she manage to just endure what’s happening to her? What about the little ones, conceived for no other purpose than to keep the mare pregnant? What does the foal suffer with such a burdened start in life? Most them end up in slaughter,  but a few lucky ones get rescued by people who understand the tragedy and are willing to interfere. Equine Voices in Arizona is one of those sanctuaries that now harbors a good number of gentle giants that escaped the PREMARIN (PMU) industry in Canada.

One of that herd was a beautiful gray gelding. He was rescued by Karen Pomroy of Equine Voices as a six month old in a larger group together with his mother. For the next nine years he spent a quiet life in a pen with a handful of older PMU females. Although he was the most impressive by size, his gentle nature was no match for the mare’s distinct determination, probably fostered by years of not having a voice at all.

Reach out to Horses (ROTH) chose this rescue for the Holistic Horsemanship Certification course. The gentle gelding named Kodiak Raja was on the list of horses that got a student assigned for some daily attention. His history included a vague story of some early training attempts gone horribly wrong with him escaping through a fence in panic and a human getting hurt. He had not experienced much training after that. The approach was thus very cautious especially because the horses were in a large pen together during the sessions.

Kodi showed little interest in being the object of a human’s attention but he was very polite and stood as much as he could until he walked away apologetically. Ropes were not his friends. An introduction to the horseman’s rope exploring the whole body was pretty much the culmination of the first week of class.

A rumor started murmuring that he would be a great candidate for a new home. It is likely redundant to point out to the readership of this newsletter that Anna Twinney (the founder of ROTH and instructor of the class) has a special gift in matching horses to students. Kodi went home in the heart of the assigned student and became part of the student’s story. Before the second half of the class started several months later, the family decided to apply for adoption with the owner of the rescue.

During the second part of the class the daily program with Kodi included grooming and work with the emotion code by Dr. Nelson. Kodi was still very reserved but politely allowed to be approached. He was not integrated into actual class work because he was not ready or trained to even be led to the “classroom”.

In the meantime, the paper side of the adoption procedure was completed. The class was over and it was up to the rescue owner and the student to get to the actual transfer. Because of Kodi’s history and his lack of training, there was worry regarding the trailer loading. Would he bolt? Hurt himself or bystanders? After a lot of consideration, one of the rescue’s regular trainers proclaimed that she would be able to load him into a trailer. A date was set and the future owners headed South early on a Tuesday morning for a five-hour ride. It was exciting! At Equine Voices the trailer was backed up to the stall where Kodi was waiting. He did not seem too concerned as he easily glanced over the tall wall at the preparations.

The trainer took over, opened a door to the outside world where fence panels led to the trailer entrance. She went into the stall and softly coaxed Kodi to move towards the opening. Nobody else moved. For about three minutes he explored alternatives: move left, move right, look for another gate… Then he stepped outside. He hesitated for a moment and approached the trailer. Both front feet went up and the trailer floor made a hollow sound. His head was now really high in this position. He bent his neck and looked back over the fence at his mom and the rest of the ladies he had spent all these years with. Then he straightened up and walked calmly inside the dark, shaky box. Helpers quickly closed the trailer doors but there was no need to hurry. He had made up his mind, he knew.

Considering his history and his experience, it is astonishing how sure his demeanor was to leave his herd behind.

A discussion erupted in the truck on the way home regarding the name. Should he get a new name now that he was headed for a new life? The decision was made to call this beautiful tall man Odin Olaf Kodi Raja.

The trip was uneventful. Judging from the quiet behind the truck, he was not particularly agitated in the trailer. At his new home the trailer was backed up to a gate that led into a corral. He walked towards the open doors and then almost fell down because he had forgotten that there was a step up into the trailer and now there was a step down. He immediately headed straight for his new family on the other side of the fence. This is an eclectic mix of rescued drafts, nervous gaited horses, BLM mustangs, and a laid back BLM burro. All together a group of nine, waiting for number ten. He respectfully offered his nose over the fence for greetings. Then he was herded into his new stall next to everybody, including a clan of alpacas. Not all horses are fond of these funny looking creatures but he wanted to say hi to them as well and stuck his head fearlessly and friendly over the fence for some mutual sniffing. A great start!

This does not seem to be the same horse that I had gotten to know at Equine Voices. He always comes up to the fence when anybody shows up. He loves attention and sticks his head into my chest for scratches around the ears. He is also very vocal and whinnies with a heartwarming bluesy voice at his new equine family, as well as at humans. He is majestic yet gentle, very friendly but still polite and not pushy. Training has started slowly with more rope work and halters. He now follows willingly on a lead into the round pen where the first sessions are going very well. He is definitely very smart and the concept of learning is no problem for him. At this point he would rather just hang out with his humans and snuggle rather than having to “work” but I am sure becoming proud of his achievements will make him look forward to lessons as much as we do. I can imagine slowly moseying through the desert on this gorgeous gray that has a magnificent soul that makes his impressively sized body seem like a tiny box.

We have yet to find his trigger points to know exactly what to work on. The plan is to have him enjoy the rest of his long life with this new family, with learning, with essential oils, with games, with good food, with good care, and above all with a purpose! You are all welcome to come and visit to meet him at our ranch. It is worth a trip.

The humble new parents.

 

Photos:

Kodi(left) at Equine Voices: Odin1

Odin (formerly Kodi) first time meeting his new family: Odin2

Odin looking good in the morning: Odin3

Odin and his new friend, BLM burro Zavorine, enjoying a Sunday afternoon at the slow feeder. He is very Buddhist when it comes to standing his ground. Especially my low pecking order horses take great pleasure in chasing him around. Zafi is the only one that just won’t waste energy with pecking order games. So for now it’s the two until he learns to manage the pesky little Paso Finos. We are practicing that whenever I am around to keep an eye on things. Carolina

20160515_153556 (1).jpg

 

 

PMU mare looking for a home in Colorado

 

She seems to be a fairly nicely built pmu mare, as crossbreeds go and her feet are in pretty good shape

. She and another mare came from a “sporthorse” breeder in Pueblo who just exposed both to a Clydesdale stallion in Feb. The condition of the property and fences was very poor and the breeder was being evicted. The breeder paid upwards of $2500 for both mares last March and they came bred to a paint stud from the “pmu” farm. So far the rescuer has about $200 into this mare and they don’t want anymore money than that. Both mares are pretty lean right now but not critically skinny. http://www.theanimalifarm.com/Steve_Waagen/HICKORY.html

She is currently in Rush, CO.

Can you give her a loving home?

PMU Mare

A New York Restaurant has Started Serving Horse Meat

It’s starting! And this could be your loved one’s fate! The controversial topic has become real and the changing trend poises a threat to all our horses. As the industry takes shape and profit becomes a stronger draw we will begin to see an increase in horse theft. Not only this, but it encourages the PMU industry and endangers our wild horses in holding facilities.

It is our duty as horse people to be the voice for the voiceless. This means we must fight to make and keep horse slaughter illegal in the United States. And to reduce the breeding of horses to bring down the numbers of horses without homes while supporting those who make a difference for those looking for their forever homes.

What you can do:

  • Call or write to your representatives to voice your opinion on horse slaughter
  • Write to restaurants serving horse meat
  • Don’t patron those restaurants and ask your loved ones to support your feelings by doing the same
  • Donate and support organizations that help the homeless horses
  • Educate people about Premarin and the byproduct it creates

View the Article: horse meat

A letter to the editor from a person who makes few good points. May it inspire you to do the same:

To The editor:

In reference to the above article on page 3 of today’s Post (9/26), reporters Erin Calabrese and Andy Soltis are missing the big picture. There is a huge difference being euthanasia and horse slaughter, the latter being the source of the “Canadian Horse meat” delicacy to which they refer. The majority, if not all, of the horse meat from Canada comes from the slaughter of foals that are the unwanted by-products of the Premarin (Hormone Replacement drug for menopausal women) Industry. Impregnated mares are kept confined to their straight stalls for their entire pregnancy, unable to turn or lie down, while their urine is collected through tubes to make the drug Premarin. The name of the drug comes from the phrase PREgnant MARes uRINe.  When the foals are born, they are ripped away from their mothers, not weaned, and sent to the feedlot where they are then bought by the slaughterhouses and to turn into this “rare dish” that the restaurant in MOMA PS I is planning to serve. Up to 30,000 foals/year over the last decade have met this fate. Luckily for me and my rescued now 6 year old mare, there are devoted people who have successfully saved many thousands of foals from this fate but alas, this dish is apparently not “controversial and rare” enough still. Maybe the chefs should consider slaughtering their dogs or cats for the next menu upgrade?

Nancy Goldmark. NY

Help us Save 12 Foals Destined for the Canadian Feed Lots

John Lennon Saving Horses From the Other Side?

We are excited to report that we are well on our way to rescuing the foals of a former Canadian P.M.U. farm and we have some amazing news to report.

But there’s also more to be done. Find out how you can join John Lennon, Equine Voices and Reach Out to Horses as we rescue, not only the foals, but the mares and stallions as well.

_____________________________________________________________________

Foal Rescuing Dinner at Strings in Denver

Can You Really Eat Your Way to Rescuing Foals?

Lil Bit Ranch North
Only 2 seats left for Wednesday Night’s Extraordinary Event!And don’t forget that you can also promote your business and save lives by donating services or merchandise for our silent auction.
We are gearing up for this Wednesday Night!  And by gearing up we mean getting ready for a delicious meal and compelling conversation with some of today’s most successful women in the worlds of healing, art, communication and horses.
For only $50 you get an all-inclusive dinner with cocktails and a large portion of the cost will go towards the rescue of not only these beautiful foals but also providing sanctuary for the breeding mares and stallions, and shutting down a former P.M.U. (Pregnant mare urine) breeding farm!
And that’s not all!
Join International Equine Specialist, Animal Communicator and Reiki Master Anna Twinney as she welcomes:
(…don’t tell anyone but there are rumors that we might be joined by even
more extraordinary women that you will definitely want to meet!)

Can’t make it?  That’s OK you can still help!  We will also be conducting a silent auction and there are some pretty awesome offerings that you won’t want to pass up! 

Do you have a business or merchandise that you could donate to the auction?  All proceeds from the silent auction go directly to the foal rescue.  For more information or to donate contact Tammy at tammy@heartintelligent.com.
Meet all of these amazing and interesting women, enjoy a delicious dinner, and together we can downsize this farm in Canada and rescue ALL the horses in the program. The mares and gelded stallions will stay in sanctuary up in Canada, 6 foals will go to Equine Voices Rescue and Sanctuary in Arizona and 6 will go to Ray of Light Farm where they will participate in the Week of Foal Gentling with International Equine Specialist and Natural Horsemanship Clinician Anna, helping them as they make their way to their forever homes.
Opportunities like these don’t come around every day and we are so excited to be a part of it. We can’t do it alone! Even with this incredible team of compassionate, competent and inspiring folks, we still need your help.
 
Event Info
Wednesday, November 2, 2011
6:00pm arrival / 7:00pm dinner
Silent Auction before dinner with all proceeds going to the foals.
Strings Restaurant
1700 Humboldt
Denver, CO  80218
$50 inclusive (includes food, cocktails and gratuity)
Attire is Cowboy (or girl) Casual.

Is John Lennon Saving Foals from the Other Side!?!

Lil Bit Ranch North  

The Answer is Yes!… sort of…

An anonymous donor has incredibly donated a letter written by John Lennon himself to be auctioned online by Equine Angels Rescue Sanctuary. All the proceeds from this auction will go towards not only the rescue of our foals but, if we get a high enough bid, the rescue of even more foals in the future!

If you are a Beatles or a Lennon fan, you really don’t want to miss this chance to get your own piece of rock history while helping to save lives at the same time!

Find out how you can bid on this one of a kind letter!  

 

________________________________________________________

 

Frank Weller and Colt 

Reach Out to Horses, several equine rescue organizations work
together to save 12 foals from the Canadian feedlots and
downsize former Canadian PMU breeding farm.

 Click Here to Donate What You Can To Save These Beautiful Foals

September 27th, 2011 – East Haddam, CT

Equine Angels Rescue Sanctuary – CT, Ray of Light Farm – CT, and Equine Voices Rescue and Sanctuary – AZ are joining forces with Reach Out to Horses based out of Golden, CO, to rescue 12 foals and assist in the closing of a former Canadian PMU breeding farm.   In addition the proposed action plan will result in placing the remaining mares in sanctuary, gelding two year old stallions and helping to end the cycle of breeding for this Canadian farmer.

E.A.R.S. and Reach Out to Horses have already begun raising funds through sales of the new 4-DVD set Success: Foals in Training and through fundraising clinics and other events by Anna Twinney and Reach Out to Horses.  But we need your help.

The estimated cost for this endeavor is $16,100 so we are seeking individuals, and organizations who wish to assist in this inspiring project.  Whether it be donations, adoption, fostering or sponsoring, all assistance is welcome.  For more information, or to help save the lives of these foals, mares and stallions, contact Frank Weller, president of Equine Angels Rescue Sanctuary at 203-733-3576, or Anna Twinney, founder of Reach Out to Horses at  info@reachouttohorses.com, or click here to donate what you can to save these horses.

E.A.R.S. has worked for almost 9 years with these and other local farmers when they first saw the wisdom and win-win-win-win opportunities that would result if allied with the farmers. The genesis of that outreach is well documented in the book “Equine Angels: Stories of Rescue, Love and Hope“.

“The reason that this good faith alliance works is that we have spent time with the farmers and their families.”, says E.A.R.S. founder Frank Weller, “We understand the social and financial dynamics that are a huge part of their decision making process.”

Over the years E.A.R.S. has been able to ferret out the people who will live up to their word and those who won’t and to establish a verifiable protocol to put the mares in sanctuary. They now have trusted people in place who really care for the mares and report their condition. They know that other people are also reporting to E.A.R.S and all reporters are unaware of the identity of our other agents. In addition E.A.R.S. has created close relationships with the vets, the farm agents, the farmers and their families. The government takes meticulous statistics and we trust most of their numbers which have followed the decline of Premarin farming.

In addition to securing sanctuary for the mares and stallions E.A.R.S. will transport all 12 foals to a rescue just over the border in North Dakota. From there, 6 will go to Equine Voices Rescue and Sanctuary near Tucson, Arizona and 6 will go to Ray Of Light Farm in East Haddam, Connecticut where they will participate in the Reach Out to Horses Week of Foal Gentling Program.

E.A.R.S. and Ray Of Light Farm have collaborated on similar rescues for almost 5 years now and this will be the 3rd successful year of the ROTH Week of Foal Gentling Event.

Possibly the best piece of this effort is that this retired farm will no longer be in the Premarin farming or the breeding business all together. Financial implications are part of that decision and a as a working farm, they have other viable sources of income. That seems to make a big difference in that the farmers with other choices are less likely to pursue breeding for meat as a revenue source. As a rescue E.A.R.S. has often encountered that mindset and absolutely cannot enable farmers to breed by buying their foals. That would be a step backwards to say the least.

Click Here to Donate What You Can To Save These Beautiful Foals

For more information, or to help save the lives of these foals, mares and stallions, contact Frank Weller, president Equine Angels Rescue Sanctuary at 203-733-3576, or Anna Twinney, founder of Reach Out to Horses at info@reachouttohorses.com.

Anna Twinney Appears on Stable Scoop – Dec. 10th, 2010

Hey everyone, Anna’s on Stable Scoop today! She tells Helena and Jennifer all about the Art of Foal Gentling and her recent Foal Gentling Clinic at Ray of Light Farm in East Haddam, CT. She also talks about PMU foals and mares and the difficult life they live. DON’T MISS IT!

Listen Now!