Fancy a Frolic with the Foals?

Final foals 2019

Let us show you how to create a bond that can’t be broken.

Over the course of 7 days, Anna will introduce you to her unique and comprehensive foal gentling methodologies. Through gentle, compassionate, and supportive communication, you will discover how to quickly and effectively introduce foals to the world of humans, training, and even their own language. These techniques are also very effective for untouched and spooky horses, and to help solve the most frustrating behavioral issues with all your horses.

You will learn (and put to use) the same uniquely designed and tested program that Anna, herself, has developed and used to start hundreds of foals!

Gentling foals can be some of the most important and rewarding work you will ever do. In this case, your efforts are even more critical. The foals we work with in this event are untrained and rescued. So in addition to getting world-class, groundbreaking training, you are helping these innocent, rescued souls. You are giving them a loving, heart-filled introduction to the human-horse connection, and gaining a solid foundation that will help them in their lives. You are also helping them to gain a greater possibility of being adopted, and a second-chance at a life they deserve to live.

I Want to Learn More About Foal Gentling

Nichole Brings Home Two Babies of Her Own After a Heartbreak and Loss

I signed up for the ROTH Foal Gentling Course after unexpectedly losing my beloved Clydesdale, Aramis. I had hoped to honor his memory and find a little bit of peace and healing. I certainly didn’t expect to feel an immediate bond with one of the foals! That first morning when I stood at the gate, watching the foals, the little liver chestnut picked up his head and stared right at me. I felt an instant connection, the same I had felt with Aramis. Then Anna chose him as my foal, the one with whom I would work for the week. I couldn’t believe it. By the second day of working with Quincy, I knew he was meant for me. I truly believe that Aramis guided me to the training so that Quincy and I could find each other. Aramis knew Quincy needed me and I needed him. The choice to bring home the Cremello girl, Ilse, happened gradually. I was so impressed with her gentle, steady nature and her intelligence. After listening to Anna’s stories of horses that didn’t have the right companionship growing up and how it affected them, I knew Quincy needed a friend. I felt Ilse would be a wonderful choice because her steady, quiet confidence would help Quincy find his. They make a wonderful pair. Ilse doesn’t push Quincy around and already Quincy looks to her when something makes him nervous. I feel so blessed to have connected with these two gentle souls and I look forward to many years of love, partnership, and companionship with them.

Quincy was the youngest of the 10 foals that participated in the ROTH gentling class. He is a beautiful liver chestnut with a white star and two white hind feet. He is curious and alert. He likes to watch what everyone is doing around him and is very playful. He will try to play with anything new you bring into his pen. He doesn’t spook easily but does lack confidence sometimes. His “sister” is helping with that.

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Ilse is a beautiful Cremello with light blue eyes. She is built like a little tank and has the most amazing mohawk. She is calm, steady, confident, and intelligent. She learns incredibly fast and seems unflappable. She is patient with Quincy and his antics. She is very mature for her age.

 

For all the videos of the Foals Course and more, go to our You Tube Channel and Discover why ROTH stands head and shoulders above the rest when it comes to gentle, compassionate, horsemanship: Go to the Reach Out to Horses You Tube Channel

My ROTH Trainer’s Path–“When the Student Is Ready, the Teacher Appears”

I can’t say that I remember signing up for Anna’s newsletters… but I was receiving them.  I remember opening one and feeling like the timing was perfect. The content spoke to me and offered something I could participate in from home, a webinar series on Holistic Horsemanship. This felt serendipitous, having recently become more involved with horses again. My mom and I loved the webinars, but I soon realized that I wanted and needed more in person — hands on experience with these methodologies. So, I went to Colorado to take the 2.5-day intro clinic and I loved it.

I grew up riding horses back east. My grandmother enrolled me in riding lessons every summer as a young girl. Gymkana, jumping, vaulting, trail rides and more. I loved the horses and my teacher.

Upon graduating from college with a BA in Documentary Studies and Photography, I moved to upstate New York and cared for my grandmother for 7 years.  After she passed, I moved back to Placitas, New Mexico. There I was immersed in and introduced to a whole new world of wild horses. They were literally in my back yard. I photographed the mustangs, also known here as “wild” or “free-roaming” horses, every time our paths crossed.  It felt powerful and special to connect with them as my dog and I enjoyed our walks on the BLM land behind my home. I learned more about the bizarre and intense issues spawned by these community horses.

Two mares were hit and killed in the Placitas village after seeking water during an intense drought, and this prompted me to become involved. I began documenting the wild ones as well as the horses that had recently been rounded up. No longer “free-roaming,” they were transitioning to a life of domestication — confined, engaging in day-to-day interaction with humans, getting microchipped by the livestock board, trailered, moved, vetted, etc. I used all of my tools to support their transition, particularly an energy healing modality called Crystalline Consciousness Technique™.

The grey stallion that was rounded up with his remaining mares was the first to get gelded. He was still very wild, not touched or haltered. The approach was to squeeze him in a secure area to heavily sedate him — enough to have him gelded, vaccinated, and his hoofs trimmed. Long story short, he was given too many drugs and had a hard time recovering from the sedation.  Everything went wrong, and in the end he had to be shot. This was quite a traumatizing experience, and very heartbreaking. It impacted me hugely, and I vowed that I would do everything in my power to prevent something like that from happening again. It was clear to me that the mustangs would have to be handled, haltered, and gentled to some extent prior to getting gelded in order to ensure that the procedure be safe, with minimal trauma and not life threatening.

Anna and ROTH were exactly what I needed. The Universe lined it all up. I have embraced the ROTH program and the education, experience and support its offered me as I learn and grow in my journey adopting, raising, and gentling Placitas Mustangs.

Anna likes to say I did her course backwards. I started with the Untouched Horse Clinic before the Foundation Course because that was my primary focus. I’m grateful that I did, but I also realized that I was lacking skills and training that the foundation course covered. I attended the 3-day Liberty clinic which blew my mind as it introduced me to a whole new world with horses. I continued with ROTH, taking the Foundation courses (1 and 3) and graduating in Fall, 2015.

I was granted the opportunity to take the Untouched Horse clinic one more time after doing part of the foundation and filling in the holes in my training. I enrolled in the Foal Gentling Clinic, and against my better judgement adopted my allocated foal because all the signs I received indicated that it was meant to be. I completed the Colt Starting Clinic, rumored to be the hardest. Indeed, it surprised me with a few firsts. I was kicked on day 1, and by the end of the week rode my first “baby”, a horse named Hopi. I then signed the contract and committed to the trainer’s program. Last month, I completed the NEW Simple Solutions Clinic and it exceeded my expectations. I loved everything about it. As I write this I am working on compiling my 20 case studies, done over the past few years, to submit for the Trainers Exams next month at Zumas Rescue Ranch in Colorado. My highlight is starting my own mustang Friendly, now five years old, under saddle with my ROTH sister Liv from Denmark for our Colt Start case study. What an exciting and fulfilling experience for us all! Friendly was also my first horse gelded (when he was 2) after the passing of the grey stallion. I was nervous, so I took my time and made sure he was haltered and ready and that I had a vet team I could trust.

My mom and I now have two dozen mustangs (after all the babies were born). They are our world, and have been for the past 3 years. We have received funding assistance from Animal Protection New Mexico, and have gelded three of our colts thus far — all free from complications.

Studying with ROTH has empowered me on many levels. Understanding the psychology and nature of the horse, and using it to support them in a trust-based partnership resonates with me on a core level. I trust that I was ready and that the perfect teacher, Anna, was placed in my path to help me and the horses I was adopting and raising. The timing was perfect to support a journey I never would have predicted. I believe completing the trainer’s exams will be a jump start for creating my own business as I move forward using all of my tools — holistic horsemanship, energy healing, essential oils and a deep desire to make a difference in the lives of humans and horses!

Clea Hall

Optimizing the “Tabula Rasa” Component of Foal Gentling as Described by Sarah Lockwood

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As I reflect on the week of foal gentling, there are so many humbling and profound lessons to consider, it feels a bit like looking around gratefully at a giant pile of Christmas presents. Every minute spent with the foals, being coached by Anna, supporting fellow students, and living the experience, is a beautiful gift. I know by now that I need downtime to process after each ROTH Clinic, and regain focus on regular life, so I build that in to the travel schedule as a general rule now. 

 As I have saved the foal gentling course until the end of my Train the Trainers course lineup, it provides a chance to reflect on the consistency of the principles, and nuts and bolts of the ROTH methodologies, that are presented in every clinic.  The beauty of ROTH is that it’s not a new recipe or game you learn at each clinic. Rather, the methods encompass all types of practical horsemanship situations and horses, but each one is like a different facet of a prism that shows you a new way to apply everything to a new category of horses.

 In the case of the foals, I was most touched by the truth in Anna’s day-one statement that they are like blank slates, and that everything we do goes with them for life. I watched this truth unfold as I gained the trust and affection of a little filly I named Topaz, who had no reason to trust a human, and every instinctual reason to run the other way. Without really doing anything other than speaking her language and being authentic, I earned this innocent, sentient creature’s trust and was able to teach her nearly all of the basic goals of the course. Even as a horsewoman intimately familiar with the ROTH methods, I was still wholly taken aback by how much can be received by these little ones in such a short time. For me, Topaz provided the most profound examples of latent learning and the value of ending sessions on a good note, because the innocence of the foals and the lack of other “baggage” makes every single message that much clearer. 

 It was empowering and educational to participate in the daily care of the foals, in building and breaking down the pens, and in writing their little “bio’s”.  In fact, putting words to paper for the purpose of spreading the word about adoption day was yet another way I was able to give a voice to the voiceless. I felt like one of the cooperative components working with the Universe to bring about the manifestation of Topaz’ adoptive home. No sooner had I created a written description of Topaz and the home she was looking for, than her family materialized and indeed adopted her and two others, just like I’d hoped. Another lesson in the power of intuitive thought, connection, and words. 

 As someone who is working to develop a specialty in wild and untouched horses, the opportunity to gentle not just foals but wild foals, was a dream come true. I’m so excited about the connections made with the Warm Springs Horse Network through Anna & Katie’s efforts, and the inroads being made with the Warm Springs Reservation Tribes to continue to support the foals born on their lands through gentle and compassionate horsemanship. 

 This clinic provides so many things for horse lovers at many different stages of their training career or just life with horses. Foal gentling is a specialty one could easily fall in love with. I look forward to doing it again as soon as I can!

To find out how you can join us in Foal Gentling, Colt Starting, and so much more, please visit us at :

Reach Out to Horses Events and Clinics

 

Foals from Warm Springs Herd Join Anna and Students in Bend, Oregon

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Anna had a great week with our ROTH students and the foals of the Warm Springs herd in Bend, Oregon.  Please visit our website, or our Facebook pages for more info on how ROTH’s gentle starting techniques are best for foals everywhere, and to learn how you can join Anna in the future!

ROTH Events Calendar

WSHN – the Warm Springs Horse Network

 

Beth Matanane – Board Member

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WSHN – the Warm Springs Horse Network was chosen to provide the amazing foals to an Anna Twinney clinic held in Sisters, Oregon this past week.  This week long, intense, hands on clinic provided attendees with something they will walk away with as a memorable life changing experience.   While learning the techniques and theory of horse gentling the students focus on obtaining the knowledge of a kinder gentler method of horsemanship.  Respect along with permissions. This makes perfect sense while dealing with eleven Warm Springs foals ranging from 2 months to 5 months old.  Recognizing the subtle body language, approach and retreat along with respect proved to this writer the amount of time effort and dedication is priceless in the student and the animal.

 

After witnessing a student establish an acceptable touching space on the animal then moving forward to establishing a true communication language between the pair.  I watched in amazement as the student was able to guide the foal into acceptance and respect for the student.   Under the kind leadership of Anna Twinney, this breakthrough between species made yet another marked impression on all that observed these actions.  The sense of accomplishment lead to one proud student and a lick smacking chewing, yawning comfortable foal.

 

Students also were hands on with the care and feeding of each foal.  Some stayed through lunch to enrich this experience even further, petting and observing the friendlier horses. As the week is progressing the entire group will travel to the Warm Springs Reservation, guided by a Tribal Member to observe the wild horses in the wild at the reservation. The amount of community abounds when WSHN is involved, we are proud to have been a piece of this multifaceted composite that has led to a well-rounded amazing learning experience. An equine nutritionist will also explain the nutritional needs of equine.

 

Auditor, Tracee Dmytryk commented on how “comfortable the foals became from her first day of observation to the third, “it’ appeared the horses had little stress, became more confident and comfortable around the students.”  Another auditor, Angie Shelby, observed on “how the gentle techniques used by Anna were an amazing interpretation of gentle horsemanship”.    Shelby also remarked on the high level of care that was given to each foal.  Anna provided what was “best for the horse – the herd.”  She also observed how, “the more reactive horses where being touched in a short period of time”, using Anna’s techniques.

 

WSHN is a 501c3 nonprofit developed by a group of four women in central Oregon.  Shontae Thomas, Robbi Pruitt, Tori Reid and Beth Matanane.  Dedicated and developed with the sole purpose of promoting the Warm Springs horses and providing an educational avenue for persons interested in the Warm Springs equine.  A portion of the proceeds from this clinic will go to aid in the care of the WSHN horses looking for adoptive families.

 

Anna Twinney is a recognized Equine Consultant at The Equus Projects/ OnSite NYC, Natural Horsemanship Clinician & animal communicator at Happy Dog Ranch and Natural Horsemanship Clinician at FOAL – Friends Of A Legacy Lives in Elizabeth, Colorado

 

Mijita’s Story…

Hi, my name is Mijita! I was recently taken off the range land in Warm Springs, Oregon, where I roamed freely with my family group. I am the color of honey, which is actually what my name means, as well as “my little daughter.”  I excel with a gentle approach and  like to know that I am being understood. I am smart and learn pretty quickly, as I showed during the foal gentling clinic.  I excelled at adapting to different approaches, touch, grooming, haltering, and the first steps for leading.   I am currently looking for my forever home and I can’t wait to see what my future holds. 

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For more information on where I can be found please visit Anna’s Website at:

Reach Out to Horses.  You can also call ROTH at 303-642-7341, and speak to the bipeds who are in charge of helping find me a home.  Thanks for considering making me a part of your homes, herds, and hearts!  I have been started so well that I am ready to go forward from here with my new forever family.  My gratitude to you for your consideration!

Sincerely,

Mijita

 

Oh Baby! Meet the 2015 Foals!

Ruby was the most delicate foal, underweight and yet quite curious; she did her best to be a little warrior princess.  It was apparent she did not understand her fate and was mourning her mother while fighting for her own life.  No more than a week old with big brown eyes and a red dun coat, tussled from the nibbling of her other young companions, Ruby was an unlucky filly on a date with destiny.  She did not ask to be born to an unwanted mare; she did not ask to become a feedlot orphan foal and she certainly did not ask to be discarded.  

Each year thousands of foals are born as bi-products of the pharmaceutical and nurse mare foal industry or to unwanted mares who find themselves hauled to the feedlots with their foals at foot.

It is illegal to send a foal under 6 months of age to horse slaughter. In spite of the law, foals as young as one day old right up to the to six months guideline, are being skinned and sold for high-end leather.  Others, who don’t meet this gruesome fate and are not rescued are sent to slaughterhouses.

These foals have no chance at life from the start. Their meat is considered a delicacy in some countries.  Horrifically, some countries actually believe that if a foal is skinned while it is still alive the meat will be tenderer.

Recently, during a week-long event, at Friends of Horses Rescue in Colorado, Anna Twinney guided students and auditors through her exclusive foal gentling process. The group worked with recently rescued orphan foals in an effort to introduce them to first touch, halter, leading, loading, and lots more, in a non-stress, compassionate and effective way!  The training they receive is priceless and a crucial step for these young horses getting adopted to the right forever homes and having that second chance at life.

Ruby stood proud and embraced the gentling week holding no grudges, but instead accepting the very first human touch, haltering, leading, veterinary care, farrier prep and holistic health support.  In the hands of rescuers she was found a surrogate mother, who due to the mourning of her own foal, was simply unable to accept her.  Found rejected for the 2nd time in her life Ruby was adopted by Reach Out to Horses where she now embraces another chance to be surrounded by foals and horses who will teach her life naturally.

“By gentling the foals and introducing them to humans it is our intention to make them better candidates for adoption. It is too easy to just throw these horses away like unwanted refuse. It is our hope to show the world just how valuable they are and help them find their way to new life,” Anna explains.

Anna, an equine linguist, animal communicator and energy healer is no stranger to this process and works almost exclusively with rescues and animal sanctuaries all over the world. Her methodologies of what the mainstream would call “horse training” is actually the translation of the horse’s language “Equus” to something humans can understand.

Reach Out to Horses was developed with the mission of bringing harmony to horses and humans.  For more than a decade, ROTH has been instrumental in the rescue and re-homing of hundreds of horses. Nearly every ROTH event doubles as a fundraiser; hundreds of thousands of dollars have been raised for the care of the horses and the ongoing operation of the rescues with which they worked.

Many of the foals from the gentling event were adopted and taken home by the students and auditors. A few are still seeking homes. To learn which foals are in need of homes please see the video below.

Meet the orphaned foals gentled by ROTH students during our recent course on foals. Several babies are looking for homes!
Meet the orphaned foals gentled by ROTH students during our recent course on foals. Several babies are looking for homes!

To learn more about Reach Out to Horses, upcoming events, courses or classes please visit ReachOutToHorses.com or email info@reachouttohorses.com.