Anna’s FREE Webinar Series Returns in 2019 for an Entirely New Beginning!

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We are excited to announce our annual FREE Webinar series with Anna Twinney and some special Reach Out to Horses guests! We are starting off the year with some amazing folks to share in some incredible, important, and inspiring conversation.

We will be talking about the potential of self-care and supplementation for you and your animal companions, the practical side of animal communication, the power of essential oils, and the possibilities of transformational horsemanship. You will also have the chance to ask Anna and her guests your questions live in each episode.

As always there is no catch and no cost to join us and we pack each webinar with a ton of valuable content. Just click on the button below and register for the full series. When we get closer to the date of the first webinar we will send you an email with all the details you need to join us. You can participate by phone or computer.

We wish you a blessed 2019 and we look forward to seeing you soon.

Happy New Year,

Anna and the ROTH team

2019 FREE Reach Out to Horses Webinar Series

January 8th – Dynamite Self-Care and Health
with Special Guests Dynamite Gold Director, Dr. Regan Golob and Dynamite Founder Jim Zamzow

Topics include:

Self-Care with Dynamite and other needs
Care for all our animal companions
The Dynamite difference
An Introduction to Doc Golob’s Moving in Miracles for the Health of It

January 15th – Practical Applications of Animal Communication

Topics Include:

Hearing your own companions
Common ways the animals can be misunderstood
Saving lives by learning to listen and understand the nuances
Improving relationships, and responsibilities
Seeing into the mirror – How animals become our stewards and saviors

January 22nd – Essential Oils and New Beginnings
with Special Guest, Founder of Healing Touch for Animals,
Carol Komitor

Topics Include:

Using Oils to support your companion’s health and wellbeing
Building stronger bonds
Focusing on self-care – relieve stress & rejuvenate
Setting intentions
Becoming a manifesting magnet

January 29th, Natural Horsemanship: Transformational Horsemanship.

Topics Include:

Why horses act a certain way
What your horse is trying to tell you
The silent and secret language
Where and how do we begin our partnership
The next generation of horsemanship
Introducing our 2019 Online Program!

Take me to the SignUp!

The Original Reiki Healing for Horses

There is no place I would rather be than in the corral among the horses and healing energy. It is a place surrounded by mountains, nestled in the heart of the wild west, where horses receive healing and, in turn, heal human hearts. It is an energy so subtle it ignites the flame within, with an art that has worldwide recognition and acceptance. If you have felt the pull of destiny, now is the time to embrace your calling as the lightworker you were born be.

 

Take me to the Information on this year’s Reiki Courses

Peppermint for President!

Peppermint

We all have our stories of woe to tell, this is for certain. Mine includes a major spinal fusion surgery at a very young age, nerve damage in numerous places, premature arthritis, and myriad other little fun things that come with the body of someone who really lived and breathed each and every day with horses in her early life and has the scars to prove it. I was hard on my body, riding was hard on my body, and some of my less-graceful encounters with horses on the ground have definitely been hard on my body. If only I had known then what I know now about safety…if only I had met Anna when I was 12 instead of…well, a couple decades later.

Living in Colorado as well can aggravate some of these issues, as the cold and the altitude are often not kind to joints; neither are some of the dry, summer conditions and the ever-shifting Barometric Pressure, but for someone like me who is probably never going to move because I LOVE it here, and who cannot take prolonged Opiate medications, nor prolonged anti-inflammatories to help with chronic pain, what is there left to do?

My friend, I introduce you to Peppermint Oil. I say this with full awareness that if someone had told me I could temper fear-inducing nerve pain, muscle spasms that cause me to utter things I probably shouldn’t, and joint pain that I will likely have the rest of my life, I would have laughed at your naivete. How cute! You want to help treat my pain with what is essentially a Christmas candy? Well, older, wiser, and more open-minded, this is what I am telling you is possible.

I don’t just use Peppermint for my chronic pain on my back and sciatic nerve, I have used it for sore throats, tight chest, coughs, sunburns, headaches, upset stomach, acid reflux, tooth pain, restless legs at night, mosquito bites, and, probably the most important for someone like me who is afraid sometimes of just how long the pain will last, how bad it might get, whether I will have to go to the ER, whether I will have to miss work, whether I will be able to take care of my horses, clean the barn, feed the dogs, drive my car, sit, lay down, sleep…and on and on ad infinitum, GROUNDING.

When I inhale and take a deep, lung-filling breath of Peppermint, I am present. The problems, the worries, the future concerns that may never come to pass are gone because I am grounded quite instantly. So, in addition to the relief of physical ailments is the added relief of anxiety. There’s just something so very healing about it because it soothes me, mind, body, and spirit, just when I need it most.

I put Peppermint directly on my skin anywhere, but some people will prefer a carrier oil because it can be quite strong. You’ll want to wash your hands and make sure you don’t get any in your eyes, of course, as even after washing my hands thoroughly I have found it in my eyes on occasion.

After having doctors tell me I would be on a number of medications for the rest of my life, medications that are in the spotlight right now and the focus of hot debate, I know I have a more holistic option with this natural approach that often gets me over the pain hump, and before I know it I have moved on mentally just enough for the body to relax and remedy whatever was the issue at the time. It is because of this I say, Peppermint for President! May the prospect and healing possibility of Peppermint grace your life the way it has mine.

Love Always,

Lacey Knight

ROTH Admin

Go here to Create Your Login to Learn More About and Purchase Young Living Oils

***Statements made on this BLOG about Young Living Essential Oils have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products and information are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Anyone suffering from disease or injury should consult with a physician or veterinarian. If you or your animal are currently on medication, please DO NOT STOP.***

 

 

 

 

The Psychology of Equus: An HHC Student’s Investigation

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How do horses interact with novel stimuli, and does personality play a role?

By Asila Bergman
2017 HHC Student

Introduction
This topic was explored with the help of three horses with previously unknown histories at Drifter’s Hearts of Hope rescue facility in Franktown, CO. The main goals of this project were to learn how horses in general use their body language and energy to communicate how they experience, feel, and learn about new things in their environments, as well as how each individual horse interacts with novel stimuli, and what this can tell us about his/her personality. Another goal was to explore these exercises as possible enrichment activities that could be used by the rescue
to encourage exploration, curiosity, and creativity in horses that may benefit from environmental stimulation.
The horses that participated in this project were Captain (12 yrs), Jack Sparrow ( 13 yrs), and Rosy (20 yrs). Since little was known about their origins, their ages were estimated. All three horses were rescued from a feedlot, and were together at a quarantine facility prior to arriving at the rescue. This project began within a few days following their arrival. They were all healthy and sound, and cleared by a vet to participate in this project.
Each horse participated in three exercises: obstacle course at liberty; obstacle course in-hand; and scent enrichment. The obstacle course consisted of nine obstacles made with a variety of different objects, and was designed for the horses to either walk across, through, over, or under, and was set up in an indoor arena. Some examples of the obstacles include: plastic chairs in two rows creating a lane to walk through; a tarp covered with swim noodles to walk over; car wash strips hanging down to walk through; wooden teeter totter to step onto and walk across. The horses were encouraged to explore the obstacle course at liberty with handlers applying pressure/release
using body language and line, and in-hand with handlers applying pressure/release with the Dually Halter.

For the scent enrichment activity, the horses were given the opportunity to explore four scents (rosemary, lavender, peppermint, and eucalyptus) in 5 min, using free choice. Each scent box was made by putting 5 drops of the designated oil onto a paper towel and placing it inside of a plastic Tupperware container with several holes in the lid. The scent boxes were presented by sliding them under the gate, and placing them on the ground in each of the horse’s run area.
Captain
During the obstacle course at liberty, Captain approached and investigated several of the obstacles almost immediately, and was exhibiting curious and relatively confident behavior. Within a few minutes of being in the arena he walked up to one of the chairs and picked it up. His level of confidence and comfort could be due to the fact that he was not alone, and also had a familiar horse, Rubicon, in the arena with him. While working their way through the obstacle course with handlers, it became apparent that when Captain was given clear instructions through body language, he was able to follow them without much hesitation or fear. He was comfortable with objects touching him on the sides, as well as stepping up and over objects. He did not require a large amount of pressure from his handler (via body language/distance) in order to work up the
courage to cross any of the obstacles that he was presented with, and appeared to enjoy taking the lead. From observing him, it appeared that the value for him in the obstacle course at liberty was exploration, being allowed to influence his environment, and showing Rubicon where to go.

Captain exhibited similar behavior during the obstacle course in-hand. His handler noted that when she allowed him to make the decisions about which path to take, he often was seeking out and investigating obstacles on his own. She described him as being very keen, intelligent, and independent. He was also engaged with her during the obstacle course, and not afraid to have a voice in the process. He had many moments when he wanted to speed the process up, and sometimes got bored relatively quickly depending on the obstacle, where as during other more difficult obstacles (e.g. teeter totter), he needed some shaping, as well as more clarity and confidence in order to get through the entire obstacle. The value for Captain during this exercise was working through the difficult obstacles with his handler as a partner—because he is so
independent, it takes practice for him to take direction and leadership from others.

When the scent boxes were placed in Captain’s run, he immediately approached them to
investigate. He used his mouth and lips to touch each box as he sniffed them, and although he moved from one box to another pretty quickly, he spent the most time near lavender and peppermint. Captain spent approximately 30 seconds investigating the scent boxes, and then turned his back to them and walked to the other end of the run. Captain was inquisitive and interested by this exercise, but once he had taken a whiff of each of the boxes, he lost interest relatively quickly.

Jack Sparrow
During the obstacle course at liberty, Jack spent the first several minutes in the corner of the arena near the mirrors, showing that he was fearful in the new environment and was seeking safety with other horses, so he remained near his reflection. Once he was asked by his handler to move through the course at liberty, he was able to complete several of the obstacles. Through observations of Jack during the obstacle course, his behavior was somewhat distrusting, as if he was preparing for things to get uncomfortable, or go wrong. He was not completely checked out, but did show a fear of engaging and a lack of confidence. His behavior showed his need for security and comfort. As the session continued and he received clear communication from his
handler, he showed more of a willingness to connect. The value for Jack during this exercise was being challenged, and gaining confidence by being thrown out of his comfort bubble, and in doing so, learning that not all experiences with new environments/objects/people have to be negative.

Jack’s sensitive side came out even more during the obstacle course in-hand. He was extremely tentative going through all of the obstacles that were asked of him. Although he didn’t spook or start, it was still very apparent that he was fearful, and told his handler this by planting his feet at the edge of each obstacle and resisting forward movement. He only moved forward off of very light and gentle pressure on the halter, and needed lots of shaping and repetition in order to feel comfortable completing an obstacle. He also needed lots of praise, extra care, and encouragement during this process. In watching Jack move through the obstacle course in-hand, it seemed that the
value for him came from learning to trust, and that by being willing to try, he learned he could rely on his handler to not put him in harm’s way.

Jack was eager to approach the scent boxes as soon as they were placed in his run. He was very curious and engaged during this exercise, and showed a side of his personality that we had not seen in either of the obstacle course sessions. He began exploring the eucalyptus scent first, and spent the most time with this box. He first sniffed it, then picked it up in his teeth, then pawed at it until it opened, at which point he briefly explored the scented paper towel. He then moved on to the other boxes, one by one, and tried to open them as well. He picked up the peppermint and swung it around in his mouth. He spent a total of 1 min, 30 sec with the boxes, and although he investigated all of them thoroughly, he spent the most time with eucalyptus and peppermint. After
investigating all of the boxes multiple times, he lost interest and moved toward the other end of the run.

Rosy
Rosy was a very interesting horse to observe during the obstacle course at liberty. Prior to this, when she was observed in her paddock where she was living with several other horses, she appeared to be depressed and withdrawn. It was quite a surprise when she was released into the arena and completely lit up with positive energy, and was behaving as if it were an opportunity to show everyone what she could do. She immediately began running around the arena and investigating all of the obstacles in her path. She looked overjoyed to be there in that space, and was behaving like a completely different horse, exhibiting confidence, comfort and courage. When her handler attempted to drive Rosy away from her (towards an object), she became confused and a little anxious. Once she began running away, it was difficult to get her to slow down, and she began to glaze over. It became very apparent that Rosy is very sensitive to energy, and when her handler began to over-think things, Rosy disconnected. However, as soon as her handler put out a
clear intention of love, Rosy became completely engaged and followed her throughout the entire course. She was willing to move through the obstacles as long as she had that partnership, leadership and guidance. Once she felt that this was attained, she was amicable and giving. The value that Rosy gained from the liberty exercise was excitement, mental stimulation and activity, a platform to express herself, and human connection and loving energy.

During the in-hand obstacle course, Rosy explored her environment in a similar manner. She was a willing partner that moved through most obstacles with ease and fearlessness, accepting her handler as a leader. She needed some shaping during the car wash strip obstacle, which proved to be more difficult for her, but once this was provided, she willingly moved under it, and later through it, without any hesitation. Her value in this exercise was being able to deepen her connection with a human, and gain affection, leadership and confidence.

Rosy did not approach the scent boxes for over a minute after they were placed in her run. When she decided to investigate them, she used her nose and her tongue. She briefly sniffed the boxes one at a time while she was licking her lips, and did not show any preference for a particular scent. She only spent about 5 seconds with the boxes, and then raised her head to watch some people who were walking off in the distance. This was more interesting to her than the scent enrichment. Once she was finished watching the humans, she turned around and left the area where the boxes were to go to the opposite end of her run, and did not return.

Summary
Each of the three horses that participated in this project responded to, and interacted with, the exercises in different ways, and this was very apparent through my observations and those of their handlers. The body language and energy that they displayed and exuded during each of the new environments/situations that they were presented with told a very clear story about what they were thinking and feeling. Some examples of body language indicators that I used to interpret the messages that each horse was conveying include: posture and movements of the entire body, appearance of eyes and ears, how tense/stiff their muscles were, how quickly/slowly they approached an object, whether they actively avoided an object, how much distance they kept between themselves and the object, and themselves and their handler, the amount of time they spent near something, whether they darted through an obstacle or walked slowly, how much time/shaping/repetition was required to get comfortable with an obstacle, which objects were more difficult, which parts of their body they used to explore an object, etc. There are likely an infinite number of examples of this (subtle and dramatic) but these were just a few that I understood, and used to interpret what the horses were thinking and feeling during my observations.

In observing Captain, Jack, and Rosy during the exercises, they began to show us what their individual personality traits were, that each of them was unique, and definitely affected how they interacted with new objects/stimulation, and how they responded to their handlers in both of the obstacle courses. The most interesting part of this project for me, was that we were able to see different parts of their personalities come out depending on the exercise, showing the depth and complexity of each individual. If we had only observed Jack in the context of the two obstacle course exercises, we would characterize him simply as a sensitive, but willing horse who was lacking in confidence and in need of security and a light touch. However, the scent enrichment exercise showed very clearly that he also has a playful, creative, and inquisitive side to him.
Another example of this would be Rosy, and how she behaved during the obstacle course at liberty. When simply observed in her paddock, she appeared very withdrawn, and her behavior completely changed when she was given the opportunity to express herself in the arena and obstacle course. However, she was not particularly moved by the scent enrichment, and was much more drawn to the human activity nearby. Prior to starting the scent enrichment with Captain, I predicted that he would be highly engaged and curious during that exercise, based on his behavior in the obstacle course, and although he did spend some time exploring the scent boxes, he was not nearly as enthusiastic about them as Jack was.

In completing this project, I learned the incredible value in exposing horses to novel stimuli, whether this may be objects, situations, environments, or stimuli targeting a particular sensory modality, as long as it is done in a way that is safe for the horse and handlers. Doing so will not only allow a horse to express themselves and grow as individuals, so that we can learn about their personality and what motivates them as intelligent beings, but also allows us to provide them with optimal care, with consideration for each of them as an individual. I see this as being of great value
to any rescue facility because it could provide important information about the horse that could aid handlers in providing adequate care, and potentially rehabilitation for certain horses with behavioral problems, as well as in matching each horse with the right person for them during the process of adoption.

 

Does Equine Psychology intrigue you? Us too!  If you couldn’t join us for this year’s HHC but want to learn more, sign up for Anna’s newsletter, Diary of a Horse Whisperer, and get access to the insights and tips she shares about the psychology of Equus delivered conveniently to your inbox!

Sign up here!

 

IT’S THIS WEEK!

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Webinars scheduled for later this month:

Join us and sign up to receive the invitation email and details at:

https://app.e2ma.net/app2/audience/signup/1826589/1757609/

 

 

Carol Komitor Joins Anna Twinney &  Reach Out to Horses for a 4-Part Webinar

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Carol Komitor – Founder of Healing Touch for Animals® will be featured on Episode 1, Thursday, December 8, 2016 6 – 8pm MST.

On Thursday, December 8th, Anna Twinney, founder of Reach Out to Horses kicks off a FREE 4-part webinar series and Anna is thrilled to once again invite none other than Carol Komitor herself to join her for the 1st episode.
Carol will join Anna to lend her ever-flowing expertise on the power and value of incorporating therapeutic essential oils into your daily life and practice.  They will share their expertise and talk about the impact Essential Oils can have on Body, Mind and Spirit for you and your animals. You will also have an opportunity to ask them the questions you have about specific oils, how to use them, or anything else you might be curious to know.

Whether you have had an interest in essential oils and want to try them, or have used them for a long time and want to deepen your use and understanding, you won’t want to miss this FREE web event.
And, if that isn’t great enough, when you register for the first webinar, you will automatically be registered for the entire series.  Topics include Partnering with Horses in Therapy, Coaching and more, Animal Communication: Animals as our Guides, and Nutritional Supplementation for you and your Animals.
There are limited spaces and it is always a popular event when Anna and Carol come together, so don’t wait, register now.

Side effects of ROTH classes:

 

Picture a being created to roam the highlands, to travel in a family band, each having their place, their role… Yet there she was, locked in a small stall like a chute, forced to carry foal after foal, year after year without once seeing green grass, the mountains, the sun, or feeling the breeze. Let alone enjoying time with the baby! Is she broken inside? Or does she manage to just endure what’s happening to her? What about the little ones, conceived for no other purpose than to keep the mare pregnant? What does the foal suffer with such a burdened start in life? Most them end up in slaughter,  but a few lucky ones get rescued by people who understand the tragedy and are willing to interfere. Equine Voices in Arizona is one of those sanctuaries that now harbors a good number of gentle giants that escaped the PREMARIN (PMU) industry in Canada.

One of that herd was a beautiful gray gelding. He was rescued by Karen Pomroy of Equine Voices as a six month old in a larger group together with his mother. For the next nine years he spent a quiet life in a pen with a handful of older PMU females. Although he was the most impressive by size, his gentle nature was no match for the mare’s distinct determination, probably fostered by years of not having a voice at all.

Reach out to Horses (ROTH) chose this rescue for the Holistic Horsemanship Certification course. The gentle gelding named Kodiak Raja was on the list of horses that got a student assigned for some daily attention. His history included a vague story of some early training attempts gone horribly wrong with him escaping through a fence in panic and a human getting hurt. He had not experienced much training after that. The approach was thus very cautious especially because the horses were in a large pen together during the sessions.

Kodi showed little interest in being the object of a human’s attention but he was very polite and stood as much as he could until he walked away apologetically. Ropes were not his friends. An introduction to the horseman’s rope exploring the whole body was pretty much the culmination of the first week of class.

A rumor started murmuring that he would be a great candidate for a new home. It is likely redundant to point out to the readership of this newsletter that Anna Twinney (the founder of ROTH and instructor of the class) has a special gift in matching horses to students. Kodi went home in the heart of the assigned student and became part of the student’s story. Before the second half of the class started several months later, the family decided to apply for adoption with the owner of the rescue.

During the second part of the class the daily program with Kodi included grooming and work with the emotion code by Dr. Nelson. Kodi was still very reserved but politely allowed to be approached. He was not integrated into actual class work because he was not ready or trained to even be led to the “classroom”.

In the meantime, the paper side of the adoption procedure was completed. The class was over and it was up to the rescue owner and the student to get to the actual transfer. Because of Kodi’s history and his lack of training, there was worry regarding the trailer loading. Would he bolt? Hurt himself or bystanders? After a lot of consideration, one of the rescue’s regular trainers proclaimed that she would be able to load him into a trailer. A date was set and the future owners headed South early on a Tuesday morning for a five-hour ride. It was exciting! At Equine Voices the trailer was backed up to the stall where Kodi was waiting. He did not seem too concerned as he easily glanced over the tall wall at the preparations.

The trainer took over, opened a door to the outside world where fence panels led to the trailer entrance. She went into the stall and softly coaxed Kodi to move towards the opening. Nobody else moved. For about three minutes he explored alternatives: move left, move right, look for another gate… Then he stepped outside. He hesitated for a moment and approached the trailer. Both front feet went up and the trailer floor made a hollow sound. His head was now really high in this position. He bent his neck and looked back over the fence at his mom and the rest of the ladies he had spent all these years with. Then he straightened up and walked calmly inside the dark, shaky box. Helpers quickly closed the trailer doors but there was no need to hurry. He had made up his mind, he knew.

Considering his history and his experience, it is astonishing how sure his demeanor was to leave his herd behind.

A discussion erupted in the truck on the way home regarding the name. Should he get a new name now that he was headed for a new life? The decision was made to call this beautiful tall man Odin Olaf Kodi Raja.

The trip was uneventful. Judging from the quiet behind the truck, he was not particularly agitated in the trailer. At his new home the trailer was backed up to a gate that led into a corral. He walked towards the open doors and then almost fell down because he had forgotten that there was a step up into the trailer and now there was a step down. He immediately headed straight for his new family on the other side of the fence. This is an eclectic mix of rescued drafts, nervous gaited horses, BLM mustangs, and a laid back BLM burro. All together a group of nine, waiting for number ten. He respectfully offered his nose over the fence for greetings. Then he was herded into his new stall next to everybody, including a clan of alpacas. Not all horses are fond of these funny looking creatures but he wanted to say hi to them as well and stuck his head fearlessly and friendly over the fence for some mutual sniffing. A great start!

This does not seem to be the same horse that I had gotten to know at Equine Voices. He always comes up to the fence when anybody shows up. He loves attention and sticks his head into my chest for scratches around the ears. He is also very vocal and whinnies with a heartwarming bluesy voice at his new equine family, as well as at humans. He is majestic yet gentle, very friendly but still polite and not pushy. Training has started slowly with more rope work and halters. He now follows willingly on a lead into the round pen where the first sessions are going very well. He is definitely very smart and the concept of learning is no problem for him. At this point he would rather just hang out with his humans and snuggle rather than having to “work” but I am sure becoming proud of his achievements will make him look forward to lessons as much as we do. I can imagine slowly moseying through the desert on this gorgeous gray that has a magnificent soul that makes his impressively sized body seem like a tiny box.

We have yet to find his trigger points to know exactly what to work on. The plan is to have him enjoy the rest of his long life with this new family, with learning, with essential oils, with games, with good food, with good care, and above all with a purpose! You are all welcome to come and visit to meet him at our ranch. It is worth a trip.

The humble new parents.

 

Photos:

Kodi(left) at Equine Voices: Odin1

Odin (formerly Kodi) first time meeting his new family: Odin2

Odin looking good in the morning: Odin3

Odin and his new friend, BLM burro Zavorine, enjoying a Sunday afternoon at the slow feeder. He is very Buddhist when it comes to standing his ground. Especially my low pecking order horses take great pleasure in chasing him around. Zafi is the only one that just won’t waste energy with pecking order games. So for now it’s the two until he learns to manage the pesky little Paso Finos. We are practicing that whenever I am around to keep an eye on things. Carolina

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