Help to Preserve a Legacy!

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Have you ever had a dream where you were standing before a wild, untouched, untamed horse; a majestic, powerful, intelligent being.  You have no ropes, no chutes, no intention to force him into submission.  Instead, you have communication, mutual respect, and trust;  a trust that you have spent time building… together.  
Finally, feeling the time is right, you reach out… waiting… and this wild heart in front of you says, “Yes”, comes forward, and allows you, a human, to touch him for the first time.  You feel the connection between the two of you and know that, through your efforts and your willingness to see him as he truly is and to be seen, you have created a genuine bond of trust and partnership.
Now know that this dream is not just fantasy but a reality that happens every year during our Reach Out to the Untouched Horse event.  Over the course of 7 life-changing days you will experience what real connection, communication and horsemanship is all about.  You will begin to see the world through the eyes of a wild horse.  As you learn their silent language, you’ll connect and experience what feels mystical and magical but is truly a learned skill that you will find useful for the rest of your life with all your horses, whether they be wild or domestic. 
You will discover how the natural horse communicates, herd dynamics, develop a bond through building a trust-based relationship.  You will uncover their motivation and learning styles, begin the training process, and socialize a group of untouched horses.  
 
You will also have the opportunity to visit the Nokota in their natural environment and witness firsthand the world of the wild horse. 
 
This experience is perfect for those who have recently fostered or adopted untouched horses. Don’t miss this rare chance to meet, work and learn from a truly beautiful representative of the wild, untamed world of Equus.
ABOUT THE HORSES YOU’LL BE WORKING WITH…
The Nokota horses descend from the last surviving population of wild horses in North Dakota. 
 
For at least a century, the horses inhabited the rugged Little Missouri badlands, located in the southwestern corner of the North Dakota and now you have the opportunity to experience these majestic beings up close.
When Theodore Roosevelt National Park was created in the 1950s, some of the wild bands were fenced in, an accident that proved to have far-reaching consequences. While the raising of federal fences provided the horses with a measure of protection, the National Park Service (NPS) does not allow wild or feral equines, and is exempt from related protective legislation. Consequently, the park spent decades attempting to remove all of the horses. 
During the 1980s, Frank and Leo Kuntz began purchasing horses after N.P.S. round-ups, named them “Nokotas,” and started to create a breed registry. Nokota horses are descended from the last surviving population of wild horses in North Dakota. 
Anna will guide you through the world of these unique and untouched horses as you learn the language of Equus, enter the magical domain of the wild horse and begin to understand their communication in the natural world.  
This is a unique opportunity to observe wild horses in their natural habitat. You will begin to understand real communication with the natural world, be introduced to herd dynamics and develop a bond through building a trust-based relationship. The young horses being socialized in this clinic have shown a natural desire to relate to humans. While striving to make their futures less traumatic for veterinary care, foster homes etc., these young horses will be your teachers.
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