Unwanted Horses vs. Unwanted Humans – Is there really a difference?

By John D. Longhill

I glanced down at the title of this article, in Horse.com, *Horse Processing Plants: Not Just a Horse Issue. It grabbed my attention. “Oh, no”, I thought, “is the issue of horse slaughter really back on the table again?” I read on. I was shocked by how the articlemisrepresented the truth about horse slaughter and I realized the lack of awareness that still exists regarding the value of horses in the course of human development. Historically, the primary reason that horses have never been bred and raised for human consumption in this country is because of the service they have given the human community. Horses have done far more to advance the development and consciousness of this country, than the ignorant minds that are now promoting the denigrating and immoral act of horse slaughter. For over five centuries, horses have not only been essential partners with us in America,supporting our growth and development, they have also been integral to the growth and development of the planet. Today, they are our partners in sporting events, recreation and especially, human development. Horse professionals, counselors and therapists are teaming up with horses to provide life-changing experiences for children and adults, physically and mentally challenged, and at-risk individuals from all walks of life. In spite of these many noble contributions, a distorted logic still exists that puts horses in the “Appropriate for human consumption category”.

Discarding “unwanted” horses through slaughter is a horrendous crime. Justifying this evil with the promise of monetary gains, or expediency, to justify the horror of these plants, showsignorance, immaturity and a wanton disregard for life. This is not unlike the rationale used by the Nazi Government to convince the Germans that killing Jews was good for the country. If someone can justify the slaughter of Jews for the good of a country and the slaughter of horses for economic reasons is it such a stretch to imagine these same thinkers rounding up homeless people, killingthem in a most inhumane way (which is how horse processing plants kill horses) and then processing their bodies for human consumption, because it makes good economic sense?

I reread the article, substituting thewords “homeless people” in place of horses. I imagined that if it made good economic sense and was legally and morally acceptable, the same people advocating the horse slaughter would be promoting the processing and exportation of people-meat also.

My outrage prompted me to rework the article, using the same logic, but substituting humans for horses. The article, listed below, “An Article for the Future?” is fictitious, but mirrors the same level of consciousness, the same lack of awareness and callous disregard for conscious beings. It is my humble attempt, through satire, to raise our collective awareness to the truth behind what is really being said in articles, about the economic benefit of horse processing plants. If it is not exposed for what it is, the only outcome is to condition us to accept violence and degradation because it makes good economic sense.

If someone were to ask me – am Isuggesting that horses be elevated to the level of humanity, in terms of the respect and love that they are due? I would unequivocally say yes! To do sodoes not diminish who we are as human beings. It raises us to the highest level we can be, respecting all life equally and without reservation, prejudice or limitation.

An Article for the Future?

As the lackluster economy continues to challenge the people-meat industry, lawmakers, city dwellers and human owners gathered at the Summit of the Human in Las Vegas, Nevada, this week, to discuss the economic state of the industry and the unwanted people issue. One of the topics drawing much attention to the summit was ways to re-establish the human meat processing industry in the United States. But the path to making processing plants profitable for investors is complicated, economic experts say.

Some more well-to-do humans have sought to reinstate people-meat processing in the U.S., which they believe would help decrease the number of unwanted homeless people. Despite potent opposition from human rights advocates, legislation promoting private sector processing plant development was introduced in a few states in 2009 with mixed results. Processing plant development legislation became law in Montana and Wyoming in 2009, and lawmakers in other states remain committed to passing similar legislation.

Economic development consultants are not surprised. Given recession-generated job and tax-revenue losses, people-processing plant development can have appeal, especially in states with cities that have a large homeless population. “People in cities having to deal with the scourge of human derelicts lying about and with begging tend to be more realistic about things (involving unwanted people),” said a spokesperson. “Also, in areas where unemployment is high, the people-processing plants could be pitched as creating jobs for other Americans and developing an underutilized resource.”

However, it takes more than processing-friendly legislation to lure serious people-meat plant developers. Along with the political will, communities must also have the infrastructure necessary to support plant operations. Experts say: “In order for a people-meat processing plant to be developed, it needs a workforce and the sewage and water infrastructure necessary to support it, places where cattle processing plants already exist are good location choices, because they could easily be retro-fitted for people-processing. In the states, you just don’t have much of a market, because Americans aren’t cannibalistic,” they said. “So to attract investors,it would have to be an export business, and then the inspection complication arises again.”

But foreign market demand for protein products including people-meat, is on the rise in Asia, Eastern Europe, and other developing economies, where per capita incomes are growing and cultural opposition to cannibalism is scant or nonexistent, said the director of the Cannibalism Marketing Information Center in Colorado. To be successful, exporters must identify marketing channels and cultivate relationships with offshore clients, and cope with export restrictions periodically imposed by foreign governments.

Meanwhile, Washington State University agricultural economists say people-processing plant promoters must be mindful of investor concerns overfinancial market fluctuations. The U.S. dollar’s current value below the Japanese yen and the European euro makes U.S. products affordable for foreign consumers. But the same products become more costly when U.S. currency value rises. The changes are directly connected to plant profits. “Plant investors will be looking at the payback period,” a spokesperson said. “They’ll have to evaluate profitability over the long term.”

Despite the passage of processing-friendly legislation, people-processing plants have yet to open in Montana and Wyoming. Even if they do, experts do not believe people-processing is the sole remedy for the overpopulation of homeless people and economic woes. “There many variables,” “The economy isn’t going to turn around overnight, but until it does we need to make every effort to curb overpopulation, and the negative affect that homeless people have on our society.”

 

Unwanted Horses vs. Unwanted Humans – Is there really a difference?

By John D. Longhill

I glanced down at the title of this article, in Horse.com, *Horse Processing Plants: Not Just a Horse Issue. It grabbed my attention. “Oh, no”, I thought, “is the issue of horse slaughter really back on the table again?” I read on. I was shocked by how the articlemisrepresented the truth about horse slaughter and I realized the lack of awareness that still exists regarding the value of horses in the course of human development. Historically, the primary reason that horses have never been bred and raised for human consumption in this country is because of the service they have given the human community. Horses have done far more to advance the development and consciousness of this country, than the ignorant minds that are now promoting the denigrating and immoral act of horse slaughter. For over five centuries, horses have not only been essential partners with us in America,supporting our growth and development, they have also been integral to the growth and development of the planet. Today, they are our partners in sporting events, recreation and especially, human development. Horse professionals, counselors and therapists are teaming up with horses to provide life-changing experiences for children and adults, physically and mentally challenged, and at-risk individuals from all walks of life. In spite of these many noble contributions, a distorted logic still exists that puts horses in the “Appropriate for human consumption category”.

Discarding “unwanted” horses through slaughter is a horrendous crime. Justifying this evil with the promise of monetary gains, or expediency, to justify the horror of these plants, showsignorance, immaturity and a wanton disregard for life. This is not unlike the rationale used by the Nazi Government to convince the Germans that killing Jews was good for the country. If someone can justify the slaughter of Jews for the good of a country and the slaughter of horses for economic reasons is it such a stretch to imagine these same thinkers rounding up homeless people, killingthem in a most inhumane way (which is how horse processing plants kill horses) and then processing their bodies for human consumption, because it makes good economic sense?

I reread the article, substituting thewords “homeless people” in place of horses. I imagined that if it made good economic sense and was legally and morally acceptable, the same people advocating the horse slaughter would be promoting the processing and exportation of people-meat also.

My outrage prompted me to rework the article, using the same logic, but substituting humans for horses. The article, listed below, “An Article for the Future?” is fictitious, but mirrors the same level of consciousness, the same lack of awareness and callous disregard for conscious beings. It is my humble attempt, through satire, to raise our collective awareness to the truth behind what is really being said in articles, about the economic benefit of horse processing plants. If it is not exposed for what it is, the only outcome is to condition us to accept violence and degradation because it makes good economic sense.

If someone were to ask me – am Isuggesting that horses be elevated to the level of humanity, in terms of the respect and love that they are due? I would unequivocally say yes! To do sodoes not diminish who we are as human beings. It raises us to the highest level we can be, respecting all life equally and without reservation, prejudice or limitation.

An Article for the Future?

As the lackluster economy continues to challenge the people-meat industry, lawmakers, city dwellers and human owners gathered at the Summit of the Human in Las Vegas, Nevada, this week, to discuss the economic state of the industry and the unwanted people issue. One of the topics drawing much attention to the summit was ways to re-establish the human meat processing industry in the United States. But the path to making processing plants profitable for investors is complicated, economic experts say.

Some more well-to-do humans have sought to reinstate people-meat processing in the U.S., which they believe would help decrease the number of unwanted homeless people. Despite potent opposition from human rights advocates, legislation promoting private sector processing plant development was introduced in a few states in 2009 with mixed results. Processing plant development legislation became law in Montana and Wyoming in 2009, and lawmakers in other states remain committed to passing similar legislation.

Economic development consultants are not surprised. Given recession-generated job and tax-revenue losses, people-processing plant development can have appeal, especially in states with cities that have a large homeless population. “People in cities having to deal with the scourge of human derelicts lying about and with begging tend to be more realistic about things (involving unwanted people),” said a spokesperson. “Also, in areas where unemployment is high, the people-processing plants could be pitched as creating jobs for other Americans and developing an underutilized resource.”

However, it takes more than processing-friendly legislation to lure serious people-meat plant developers. Along with the political will, communities must also have the infrastructure necessary to support plant operations. Experts say: “In order for a people-meat processing plant to be developed, it needs a workforce and the sewage and water infrastructure necessary to support it, places where cattle processing plants already exist are good location choices, because they could easily be retro-fitted for people-processing. In the states, you just don’t have much of a market, because Americans aren’t cannibalistic,” they said. “So to attract investors,it would have to be an export business, and then the inspection complication arises again.”

But foreign market demand for protein products including people-meat, is on the rise in Asia, Eastern Europe, and other developing economies, where per capita incomes are growing and cultural opposition to cannibalism is scant or nonexistent, said the director of the Cannibalism Marketing Information Center in Colorado. To be successful, exporters must identify marketing channels and cultivate relationships with offshore clients, and cope with export restrictions periodically imposed by foreign governments.

Meanwhile, Washington State University agricultural economists say people-processing plant promoters must be mindful of investor concerns overfinancial market fluctuations. The U.S. dollar’s current value below the Japanese yen and the European euro makes U.S. products affordable for foreign consumers. But the same products become more costly when U.S. currency value rises. The changes are directly connected to plant profits. “Plant investors will be looking at the payback period,” a spokesperson said. “They’ll have to evaluate profitability over the long term.”

Despite the passage of processing-friendly legislation, people-processing plants have yet to open in Montana and Wyoming. Even if they do, experts do not believe people-processing is the sole remedy for the overpopulation of homeless people and economic woes. “There many variables,” “The economy isn’t going to turn around overnight, but until it does we need to make every effort to curb overpopulation, and the negative affect that homeless peoplehave on our society.”

Unwanted Horses vs. Unwanted Humans – Is there really a difference?

 

 

 

By John D. Longhill

 

I glanced down at the title of this article, in Horse.com, *Horse Processing Plants: Not Just a Horse Issue. It grabbed my attention. “Oh, no”, I thought, “is the issue of horse slaughter really back on the table again?” I read on. I was shocked by how the articlemisrepresented the truth about horse slaughter and I realized the lack of awareness that still exists regarding the value of horses in the course of human development. Historically, the primary reason that horses have never been bred and raised for human consumption in this country is because of the service they have given the human community. Horses have done far more to advance the development and consciousness of this country, than the ignorant minds that are now promoting the denigrating and immoral act of horse slaughter. For over five centuries, horses have not only been essential partners with us in America,supporting our growth and development, they have also been integral to the growth and development of the planet. Today, they are our partners in sporting events, recreation and especially, human development. Horse professionals, counselors and therapists are teaming up with horses to provide life-changing experiences for children and adults, physically and mentally challenged, and at-risk individuals from all walks of life. In spite of these many noble contributions, a distorted logic still exists that puts horses in the “Appropriate for human consumption category”.

 

Discarding “unwanted” horses through slaughter is a horrendous crime. Justifying this evil with the promise of monetary gains, or expediency, to justify the horror of these plants, showsignorance, immaturity and a wanton disregard for life. This is not unlike the rationale used by the Nazi Government to convince the Germans that killing Jews was good for the country. If someone can justify the slaughter of Jews for the good of a country and the slaughter of horses for economic reasons is it such a stretch to imagine these same thinkers rounding up homeless people, killingthem in a most inhumane way (which is how horse processing plants kill horses) and then processing their bodies for human consumption, because it makes good economic sense?

 

I reread the article, substituting thewords “homeless people” in place of horses. I imagined that if it made good economic sense and was legally and morally acceptable, the same people advocating the horse slaughter would be promoting the processing and exportation of people-meat also.

 

My outrage prompted me to rework the article, using the same logic, but substituting humans for horses. The article, listed below, “An Article for the Future?” is fictitious, but mirrors the same level of consciousness, the same lack of awareness and callous disregard for conscious beings. It is my humble attempt, through satire, to raise our collective awareness to the truth behind what is really being said in articles, about the economic benefit of horse processing plants. If it is not exposed for what it is, the only outcome is to condition us to accept violence and degradation because it makes good economic sense.

 

If someone were to ask me – am Isuggesting that horses be elevated to the level of humanity, in terms of the respect and love that they are due? I would unequivocally say yes! To do sodoes not diminish who we are as human beings. It raises us to the highest level we can be, respecting all life equally and without reservation, prejudice or limitation.

 

 

 

An Article for the Future?

 

As the lackluster economy continues to challenge the people-meat industry, lawmakers, city dwellers and human owners gathered at the Summit of the Human in Las Vegas, Nevada, this week, to discuss the economic state of the industry and the unwanted people issue. One of the topics drawing much attention to the summit was ways to re-establish the human meat processing industry in the United States. But the path to making processing plants profitable for investors is complicated, economic experts say.

 

 

 

Some more well-to-do humans have sought to reinstate people-meat processing in the U.S., which they believe would help decrease the number of unwanted homeless people. Despite potent opposition from human rights advocates, legislation promoting private sector processing plant development was introduced in a few states in 2009 with mixed results. Processing plant development legislation became law in Montana and Wyoming in 2009, and lawmakers in other states remain committed to passing similar legislation.

 

Economic development consultants are not surprised. Given recession-generated job and tax-revenue losses, people-processing plant development can have appeal, especially in states with cities that have a large homeless population. “People in cities having to deal with the scourge of human derelicts lying about and with begging tend to be more realistic about things (involving unwanted people),” said a spokesperson. “Also, in areas where unemployment is high, the people-processing plants could be pitched as creating jobs for other Americans and developing an underutilized resource.”

 

However, it takes more than processing-friendly legislation to lure serious people-meat plant developers. Along with the political will, communities must also have the infrastructure necessary to support plant operations. Experts say: “In order for a people-meat processing plant to be developed, it needs a workforce and the sewage and water infrastructure necessary to support it, places where cattle processing plants already exist are good location choices, because they could easily be retro-fitted for people-processing. In the states, you just don’t have much of a market, because Americans aren’t cannibalistic,” they said. “So to attract investors,it would have to be an export business, and then the inspection complication arises again.”

 

But foreign market demand for protein products including people-meat, is on the rise in Asia, Eastern Europe, and other developing economies, where per capita incomes are growing and cultural opposition to cannibalism is scant or nonexistent, said the director of the Cannibalism Marketing Information Center in Colorado. To be successful, exporters must identify marketing channels and cultivate relationships with offshore clients, and cope with export restrictions periodically imposed by foreign governments.

 

Meanwhile, Washington State University agricultural economists say people-processing plant promoters must be mindful of investor concerns overfinancial market fluctuations. The U.S. dollar’s current value below the Japanese yen and the European euro makes U.S. products affordable for foreign consumers. But the same products become more costly when U.S. currency value rises. The changes are directly connected to plant profits. “Plant investors will be looking at the payback period,” a spokesperson said. “They’ll have to evaluate profitability over the long term.”

 

 

 

Despite the passage of processing-friendly legislation, people-processing plants have yet to open in Montana and Wyoming. Even if they do, experts do not believe people-processing is the sole remedy for the overpopulation of homeless people and economic woes. “There many variables,” “The economy isn’t going to turn around overnight, but until it does we need to make every effort to curb overpopulation, and the negative affect that homeless peoplehave on our society.”

 

 

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